Psychology

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.

Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

Howdy, folks, and Happy New Year from StudioTulsa. We've been airing The Best of ST for 2014 on our program lately, and hopefully you've heard and enjoyed some or all of these encore presentations.

Here's a guide to what we've been listening back to over the past week; please note that each listing below has a link whereby you can access a free, on-demand "stream" of the show in question. And thanks, as ever, for listening to ST.

File photo

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Deborah Leong, professor emerita of psychology at Metropolitan State College of Denver, where she taught for more than three decades. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Chris Guillebeau, an entrepreneur, traveler, and New York Times bestselling author. His first two books were "The Art of Non-Conformity" and "The $100 Startup" -- and today he tells us about his newest book, "The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life." Within the last year or so, Guillebeau completed his personal quest to visit every country in the world before reaching the age of 35.

(Note: This program originally aired in July.) On this edition of our show, we offer a how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

The Internet is changing life itself, and it's doing so rather quickly, and we all know this. But how is it changing...us? We speak with Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and the Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford.

We at StudioTulsa have been enjoying some much-cherished vacation time these past two weeks -- and hopefully you, dear listeners, have likewise enjoyed our Encore Presentations of ST for the weeks of August 4th and August 11th. If you'd like to listen to any of these past programs, you'll find audio-stream buttons for them at the following links.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from April of this year. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Stephen P. Hinshaw, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Vice-Chair for Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Hinshaw is also the co-author of "The ADHD Explosion: Myths, Medication, Money, and Today’s Push for Performance," which he discusses with us on today's show.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Family secrets. They're as common and as varied --- and as much a part of life --- as are families themselves. Such secrets, those we keep and those we discover, greatly influence who we are and how we live. And our guest is an expert in this regard: Jane Isay is a writer (and former book editor and publisher) whose previous works include "Walking on Eggshells," about parents and their adult children, and "Mom Still Likes You Best," about adult siblings.

There's an old Lenny Bruce one-liner that goes like this: "Everyday, people are straying away from the church and going back to God." In this day and age, there must be some truth to that idea; while it's true that more and more people in this country are giving up on the religion they grew up with or else rejecting organized religion entirely, it's also true that many who have turned away from religious institutions --- as well as many others who've lived wholly without religion --- really do hunger for something more than what contemporary secular life has to offer.

Today on ST, we speak by phone with Douglas T. Kenrick, a professor of psychology at Arizona State University. He's also one of the co-authors of a recent book, "The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think," which a reviewer for Mother Jones magazine calls "a fun romp through the comedy of human errors. Again and again, the authors find, evolutionary urges and hardwired brains explain behaviors rational economists cannot.

(Note: This show originally aired last August.) Today, an interesting chat with Catherine Steiner-Adair, a noted clinical psychologist, school consultant, and author. She maintains a private practice in Massachusetts, is a clinical instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and is also an associate psychologist at McLean Hospital, which is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with John Geiger, the bestselling author of "The Third Man Factor" and "Frozen in Time," among other books. A member of the editorial board of the Toronto Globe and Mail, Geiger is, moreover, a fellow of the Explorers Club and the chair of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Expeditions Committee.

Family secrets. They're as common and as varied --- and as much a part of life --- as are families themselves. Such secrets, those that we keep and those that we discover, greatly influence who we are and how we live. And our guest is an expert in this regard: Jane Isay is a writer (and former book editor and publisher) whose previous works include "Walking on Eggshells," about parents and their adult children, and "Mom Still Likes You Best," about adult siblings.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, speaks with us about her latest book, which is a collection of essays on how we as human beings perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Rick Hanson, a neuropsychologist and author whose books include "Buddha's Brain," "Just One Thing," and "Mother Nurture." Dr.

There's saving. There's keeping. There's collecting. And then there's hoarding. Compulsive hoarding is a problem in our society, and has long been seen as such, but it was only officially deemed a mental disorder with its inclusion, earlier this year, in the newest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or DSM). In other words, from a clinical/medical/scientific perspective, researchers have only begun to study hoarding in a serious way over the last couple of decades. On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with Dr.

On our show today, an interesting chat with Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD, a noted clinical psychologist, school consultant, and author. She maintains a private practice in Massachusetts, is a clinical instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and is also an associate psychologist at McLean Hospital, which is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts.

Why are concussions in sports today --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this encore edition of our program, we listen back to an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. When we originally spoke with Dr.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion from April of this year. At that time, we spoke by phone with the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this, in turn, tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition.

Why are concussions in sports --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this edition of our program, an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research here in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. A week from tonight --- on Thursday the 6th, beginning at 6pm --- Dr.

What should one say to a person who's thinking of taking his or her own life? What's the proper way to react to such news? How best should one respond? The Mental Health Association in Tulsa will present the 13th Annual Charles P. Seger Seminar this evening (Thursday the 23rd) at 6pm at the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center. The theme for this year's seminar, which is free to the public (with no registration required), is "Recovering from Suicide and Depression." Our guest on ST is Dr.

"Eight Cultural Conflicts That Make Us Who We Are"

May 14, 2013

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Hazel Rose Markus, who is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural psychology.

(Please note: This interview originally aired in January of this year.) Our guest on ST is Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, joins us by phone to talk about her fascinating new volume, which is a collection of essays on how we perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, our guest host Dr. John Henning Schumann speaks with one of his esteemed medical colleagues, Dr. Jennifer Hays-Grudo, who is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine as well as the George Kaiser Family Foundation Chair in Community Medicine at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Dr. Hays-Grudo received both her master's and doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Houston and her bachelor's in psychology from Texas Tech University. "I'm interested in how people grow and change over time," she says. Dr.

"Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes"

Jan 22, 2013

Our guest on ST is Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, joins us by phone to talk about her fascinating new volume, which is a collection of essays on how we perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Michael L. Wehmeyer, a Professor of Special Education and Director of the Center on Developmental Disabilities at Kansas University. He's published more than 25 books and 250 scholarly articles and book chapters on topics related to special education, understanding intellectual disability, eugenics, and self-determination --- and he is the co-author of a new book, "Good Blood, Bad Blood: Science, Nature, and the Myth of the Kallikaks." A former Tulsan and University of Tulsa graduate, Dr.

Pages