Psychology

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with two staff members at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (LIBR): Martin Paulus is Scientific Director and President of the facility, and Florence Breslin is its Psychiatric Research Coordinator. Both tells us about a truly groundbreaking new brain-development study that LIBR is participating in. As is noted of this study at the LIBR website : "As one of 19 institutions selected nationwide to receive the prestigious Adolescent Brain Cognitive...

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Jeff Olivet, who is the President and CEO of the Boston-based Center for Social Innovation. Olivet is also a nationally recognized expert on homelessness, poverty, affordable housing, behavioral health, public health, and HIV -- and he'll be speaking about "Racism and Homelessness in America" at this year's National Zarrow Mental Health Symposium, which happens here in Tulsa from today (the 28th) through Friday (the 30th) at the Cox Business...

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fascinating conversation that we had in April of 2013 with the noted primatologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Sapolsky (who's a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University) about his popular book, "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," which is now in its third edition. It's an engrossing and often witty study of how stress affects the human body, and as we note in this book: "How many hippos worry about whether Social...

Do you happen to know, among your circle of friends and relatives and colleagues, a "pack rat" or two -- i.e., people who just can't seem to throw things away? On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of compulsive hoarding, which is an anxiety disorder affecting a great many Americans that makes it quite difficult for someone to discard with possessions, regardless of the actual value of those possessions. Our guest is Matt Paxton, host of the popular A&E...

How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma. Brown has been conducting research on how people think, feel, and behave for over 20 years, and he speaks with us about his new book, just out from Oxford University Press, which is...

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) We speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men" and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published in 2014, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the...

(Note: This interview first aired in early June.) "Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, routinely exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White...

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting and often surprising discussion with Dr. Pamela Wible, an Oregon-based physician who is the founder of the Ideal Medical Care Movement -- and who is also an expert on physician suicide in America. Indeed, Dr. Wible is an active writer, blogger, speaker, and advocate when it comes to mental health among doctors all over the nation -- from the trials and travesties of medical school to the stresses and demands of running a practice....

This world, as we know, is rapidly becoming a more and more complicated and media-saturated place -- and therefore raising children, it seems, is becoming more and more difficult to do. On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Ross W. Greene, an author, speaker, and child psychologist who was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over twenty years, and who is also the founding director of the nonprofit organization Lives in the Balance ( LivesintheBalance.org ). Dr. Greene talks...

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." That book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom....

"Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, tenacity, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams....

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Lawrence Aber, the Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, where he is also a University Professor. Dr. Aber is an internationally respected expert on child development, poverty, psychology, and how all of these relate to social policy. Last night, he gave a free lecture at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Learning Center entitled "Is There 'Normal...

On this inaugural edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of the "family memories" that we as human beings carry in our very genes. Guest host John Schumann speaks with Mark Wolynn, the director of The Family Constellation Institute in San Francisco, where he trains clinicians and treats people struggling with depression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive thoughts, self-injury, chronic pain, and illness. Wolynn has a new book, just out from Viking, called "It Didn't...

We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." This book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom. Cain tells us about this insightful new book, which...

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with the British economist Caroline Webb, who also works as a management consultant and executive coach; she is a former partner at McKinsey and Company, and she now has her own consulting firm, Sevenshift, which helps clients be more productive, inspired, and effective at work. Webb talks with us about her new book, which is "How to Have a Good Day: Harness the Power of Behavioral Science to...

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Vaishnavi is one of the authors of the newly...

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we share an interesting chat with Krista Tippett that was taped last Saturday afternoon at a Book Smart Tulsa event at All Souls Unitarian Church. Tippett is, of course, the award-winning host of the public radio program On Being, which airs on KWGS Sundays at noon -- and which is widely acclaimed for its insightful and extended conversations regarding life's biggest questions. It's an always-engaging show whose guests include all sorts of experts, from...

(Note: This show first aired last year.) Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today. That book is "Playing Scared: A History...

On this edition of ST, we learn about a novel called "The Unraveling of Mercy Louis," which has just recently appeared in paperback. Our guest is the author, Keija Parssinen, who grew up in Saudi Arabia and Texas before graduating from Princeton University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Parssinen is now an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa, and she tells us about the themes, experiences, and ideas that led to the creation of this (her second) novel. As was noted of...

On this edition of our show, we speak with the British economist Caroline Webb, who also works as a management consultant and executive coach; she is a former partner at McKinsey and Company, and she now has her own consulting firm, Sevenshift, which helps clients be more productive, inspired, and effective at work. Webb talks with us about her new book, which is "How to Have a Good Day: Harness the Power of Behavioral Science to Transform Your Working Life." It's a book that uses recent...

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest on ST is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades. He joins us to talk about his book called "NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity." Praised by Nature magazine as "a comprehensive history of the science and culture surrounding autism studies [and] an essential resource" -- and featuring a foreword by the...

Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Vaishnavi is one of the authors of the newly released book, "The Traumatized...

(Note: This interview originally aired in June.) On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising...

On this edition of ST, our guest is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades. He joins us to talk about his book, just out, called "NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity." Praised by Nature magazine as "a comprehensive history of the science and culture surrounding autism studies [and] an essential resource" -- and featuring a foreword by the late Oliver Sacks -- this book...

Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today. That book is "Playing Scared: A History and Memoir of Stage Fright." As was noted...

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled...

On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through...

(Please note: This show originally aired in January.) Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope. The author explains in clear terms the physical causes and...

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in November.) On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Chris Guillebeau, an entrepreneur, traveler, and New York Times bestselling author. His first two books were "The Art of Non-Conformity" and "The $100 Startup" -- and today he tells us about his newest book, "The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life." Within the last year or so, Guillebeau completed his personal quest to visit every country in...

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Howard Gardner, a Professor of Education at Harvard University, who is the 2015 Brock International Prize in Education Laureate . Well-regarded worldwide for his groundbreaking work in psychology, Gardner is best known for his theory of "multiple intelligences," which basically sees intelligence as multi-dimensional rather than as a singular trait or quality. This theory has -- over the past generation or so -- become a mainstream concept in the...

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