Psychology

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sunil Aggarwal, who grew up in Oklahoma and is now based in the Seattle area. He's a medical marijuana expert who's also a clinical instructor at the University of Washington School of Medicine; his focus is on the use of cannabis in clinical practice, medical research, and education. Dr. Aggarwal holds degrees in medicine, medical geography, chemistry, philosophy, and religious studies. He'll be speaking in support of State Question 788 today (the 8th) here in Tulsa, and then he'll do so tomorrow (the 9th) in Norman, Oklahoma.

Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky has spent his professional life attempting to understand the underpinnings and science behind human behavior, studying wild baboon populations as well as the complex workings of the human brain. The professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient is the author of several books on various aspects of behavior -- and his latest, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worse," seems like a summation of his knowledge on the subject.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Nicole Washington, who has worked in the past as both an academic and community-based psychiatrist, and who's now on the staff at Family and Children's Services here in Tulsa. Dr. Washington also operates a private practice dedicated to helping high-level professionals deal with a variety of emotional and mental issues.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. John Bargh, a social psychologist at Yale who's widely seen as a leading expert on the unconscious mind. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Library Journal: "Although the work [in this book] is girded with years of studies and research, humor and use of personal anecdotes keep the writing accessible.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a conversation with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, which is located in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. A well-regarded expert on how childhood stress can lead to adult disease, Dr. Harris speaks with us about her new book, "The Deepest Well." We also learn about how and why Dr. Harris -- a pediatrician by training -- was the subject of a game-changing 2011 profile in The New Yorker Magazine.

Our guest is Dr. Daphne de Marneffe, a noted clinical psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area who has counseled couples and individuals for decades. Her new book, "The Rough Patch," aims to help married people both locate and maintain a union that promotes compatibility between an individual person's development and the often relentless demands of a two-person relationship. As was noted by Booklist, this volume is "densely packed with de Marneffe’s extensive knowledge of human emotional development and the parent-child relationships that affect us from birth....

(Note: This interview originally appeared in September of last year.) We offer a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

On this edition of our show, we revisit our interesting November 2017 dialogue with Dr. Matthew Walker about his book, "Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams." As per The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a thoughtful tour through the still dimly understood state of being asleep.... [This] is a book on a mission. Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too. And it is urgent.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Matthew Walker, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at UC Berkeley, where he directs its Sleep and Neuroimaging Lab. Dr. Walker joins us to discuss his new book, "Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams." As per The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a thoughtful tour through the still dimly understood state of being asleep.... [This] is a book on a mission. Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too. And it is urgent.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. John Bargh, a social psychologist at Yale who's widely seen as a leading expert on the unconscious mind. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Library Journal: "Although the work [in this book] is girded with years of studies and research, humor and use of personal anecdotes keep the writing accessible.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the remarkable life and work of Dr. John Sarno, who died earlier this year at 93. As was noted in his New York Times obituary, Dr. Sarno was "a doctor at New York University whose controversial books on the psychological origins of chronic pain sold over a million copies, even while he was largely ignored or maligned by many of his medical peers.... Revered by some as a saint and dismissed by others as a quack, Dr.

On this installment of ST, a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting conversation with Dr. Justin Feinstein, who's a clinical neuropsychologist at Tulsa's Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) as well as an assistant professor of psychology in TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences. Dr. Feinstein also directors the "Float Clinic" at LIBR, which studies how and why floating in a foot or so of water -- to which has been added more than a ton of Epsom Salt -- can aid those who suffer from acute stress, high-level anxiety, PTSD, and similar afflictions.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of doctors and suicide in America today. Our guest is the psychiatrist and author, Dr. Michael Myers, a Brooklyn-based expert on this subject; his latest book is "Why Physicians Die by Suicide: Lessons Learned from Their Families and Others Who Cared." As was noted of this book by Dr. Carol A. Bernstein, a past president of the American Psychiatric Association: "In tackling one of the biggest medical challenges of our time -- physician depression and suicide -- Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions." In an appreciation of this book by Publishers Weekly, we find: "Science journalist Begley demystifies compulsive behavior, exploring its history and manifestations and the many difficulties its sufferers face in finding appropriate diagnoses and treatment.

On this edition of our show, an interesting if rather unsettling discussion with Edward D. Hess, who is a co-author of the newly released book, "Humility Is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age." As was noted of this volume in a detailed appreciation posted at the online San Francisco Review of Books: "What will be the percentage of jobs that technology will replace in the United States during the next two decades? Estimates vary but not that much. There seems to be a consensus: a range of 45 to 50% between now and 2037.

The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the adolescent and post-adolescent years, and all that go with them -- can be difficult, of course, for a host of reasons. Whether it's finding a job, finishing school, locating a place to live, discovering what one's goals really are, deciding on a career path, and so forth -- these can be trying experiences; relying on the aid of one's family and friends in such cases is paramount. But what if you're confronting these realities and you actually have no family? Or you have no "support network" of friends, mentors, and relatives?

Our guest is Bryce Hoffman, a bestselling author, speaker, and consultant who helps companies plan better and leaders lead better by applying systems from the worlds of business and the military. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Red Teaming: How Your Business Can Conquer the Competition by Challenging Everything." What is "red teaming," you ask?

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a broadcast from late February. At that time, our guest was psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker.

On this edition of ST, our guest is psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker. He joins us to discuss his book, "War Torn: Stories of Courage, Love, and Resilience." With 200 million people affected by armed conflict or genocide worldwide, refugees are appearing in record numbers; indeed, not since World War II have so many war-affected migrants been relocating around the globe.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

What is meant by the term "placebo effect"? What exactly is being described, and how is it brought about? And is this term a medical reality? Does it actually -- that is, scientifically -- exist? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we hear from journalist Erik Vance, whose writing has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, Scientific American, and other publications.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with two staff members at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (LIBR): Martin Paulus is Scientific Director and President of the facility, and Florence Breslin is its Psychiatric Research Coordinator. Both tells us about a truly groundbreaking new brain-development study that LIBR is participating in.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Jeff Olivet, who is the President and CEO of the Boston-based Center for Social Innovation. Olivet is also a nationally recognized expert on homelessness, poverty, affordable housing, behavioral health, public health, and HIV -- and he'll be speaking about "Racism and Homelessness in America" at this year's National Zarrow Mental Health Symposium, which happens here in Tulsa from today (the 28th) through Friday (the 30th) at the Cox Business Center downtown.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fascinating conversation that we had in April of 2013 with the noted primatologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Sapolsky (who's a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University) about his popular book, "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," which is now in its third edition.

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