Psychology

On this edition of our show, we speak with the British economist Caroline Webb, who also works as a management consultant and executive coach; she is a former partner at McKinsey and Company, and she now has her own consulting firm, Sevenshift, which helps clients be more productive, inspired, and effective at work.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest on ST is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in June.) On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through the day.

On this edition of ST, our guest is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through the day. At times he couldn't walk across a room, or open a door, or even name his children.

(Please note: This show originally aired in January.) Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in November.) On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Chris Guillebeau, an entrepreneur, traveler, and New York Times bestselling author. His first two books were "The Art of Non-Conformity" and "The $100 Startup" -- and today he tells us about his newest book, "The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life." Within the last year or so, Guillebeau completed his personal quest to visit every country in the world before reaching the age of 35.

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