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9:27 am
Wed June 12, 2013

China Launches Crew Into Space, Starting 15-Day Mission

China's Shenzhou-10 rocket blasts off from its launchpad in the Gobi Desert, as China started its longest manned space mission Tuesday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:08 pm

China successfully launched its Shenzhou-10 spacecraft Tuesday, sending its three crew members into orbit on a Long March-2F carrier rocket. The astronauts are expected to dock with an orbiting lab, the Tiangong-1; their mission will last 15 days.

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9:26 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Kitchen Window: A Guide to Grilling Beyond 'Dude Food'

Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 12:40 pm

I have vivid memories of my mom going out of town one weekend and my dad feeding me fried bologna sandwiches for three nights in a row. He didn't make the sandwiches because I liked them; he made them because he can't cook. He can't get around a kitchen. He doesn't know how to chop an onion. He has no idea how to roast a chicken. But the man can grill.

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9:26 am
Wed June 12, 2013

With Space-Bound Hubbies, 'Astrowives' Became 'First Reality Stars'

Annie Glenn, Rene Carpenter, Louise Shepard, Betty Grissom, Trudy Cooper and Marjorie Slayton attend a luncheon held in their honor by the American Newspaper Women's Club on April 27, 1962, in Washington, D.C. Mercury Seven wife Josephine Schirra is not pictured.
Harvey Georges AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:53 am

In the late 1950s, after the Soviet Union successfully put their satellite, Sputnik 1, into orbit, American fears over the Communist threat reached a new height. The U.S. was trailing badly in a competition that would come to define the next decade – the race to space.

So on April 9, 1959, the U.S. kicked off its own space age by introducing the country to its first astronauts, known as the Mercury Seven. Their story is well known, but the story of their wives is often overlooked.

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8:48 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Hands-Free Gadgets Don't Mean Risk-Free Driving

A University of Utah volunteer drives through Salt Lake City's Avenues neighborhood as a camera tracks her eye and head movement. Another device records driver reaction time, and a cap fitted with sensors charts brain activity.
AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 10:49 am

If you've felt smug and safe using built-in, voice-controlled technology for text messages, email and phone calls while driving, forget it. There are some sobering findings about the risk of distraction from the American Automobile Association and the University of Utah.

The proliferation of hands-free technology "is a looming public safety crisis," AAA CEO Robert Darbelnet says. "It's time to consider limiting new and potentially dangerous mental distractions built into cars."

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2:54 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

The Most Dangerous Traffic Circle In The World?

Rob Whitworth Vimeo

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:22 am

I've been to New Delhi where traffic is frightening. I've seen pictures of Nairobi and Bangkok, where it's even scarier. But Ho Chi Minh City? The town we used to call Saigon? I don't think I'd put myself in a truck, car, bike or even a Sherman tank in that town. This video opens in the scariest traffic circle I could imagine — actually, it's beyond imagining — where bikes, cars and people seem simultaneously, collectively and individually heading straight at each other (when you look, just count the vehicles and people on collision course; there are at least two or three in every frame).

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2:54 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

South Korea Says Talks With The North Are Off

Delegates from South Korea (left) and North Korea wrap up a working-group meeting in the border village of Panmunjom in advance of talks that were scheduled for Wednesday in Seoul.
South Korean Unification Ministry AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:45 am

Delicate preparations for talks between North and South Korea collapsed like a souffle Tuesday, after both sides objected over who was going to show up to do the talking.

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2:53 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

A Brave New World: Big Data's Big Dangers

Big Data may not be much to look at, but it can be powerful stuff. For instance, this is what the new National Security Agency (NSA) data center in Bluffdale, Utah, looks like.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:12 pm

New technologies are not all equal. Some do nothing more than add a thin extra layer to the top-soil of human behavior (i.e., Teflon and the invention of non-stick frying pans). Some technologies, however, dig deeper, uprooting the norms of human behavior and replacing them with wholly new possibilities. For the last few months I have been arguing that Big Data — the machine-based collection and analysis of astronomical quantities of information — represents such a turn.

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2:53 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Google Asks Permission To Publish Info About FISA Requests

Google was recently allowed to release general data about national security letters it receives, as seen in this chart. The company is now asking the U.S. government to allow it to publish similar data on national security requests, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Google

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 2:24 pm

As Google and other large tech companies cope with the aftermath of recent reports that the National Security Agency has had broad access to their users' data, the search giant is asking the U.S. government for permission to publish the number of national security requests it receives, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

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2:48 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Rises In Great Britain

A public health poster from 1952 encourages Americans to get checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea is the second-most-common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 300,000 cases reported in 2011.
Images from the History of Medicine

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:31 am

Forms of gonorrhea that don't respond to the last line of antibiotics have rapidly spread in Great Britain, expanding the reach of drug-resistant disease.

The number of gonorrhea cases with decreased sensitivity to the front-line drug cefixime increased by nearly six times from 2004 to 2011 in England and Wales, a team from the U.K.'s Health Protection Agency reported Tuesday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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8:54 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Feds Drop Opposition To OTC Sales Of Morning-After Pill

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 9:38 pm

The federal government says it will withdraw its appeal of a court order allowing girls of any age to buy emergency contraception, as U.S. agencies move to comply with U.S. District Court Judge Edward Korman's order that "morning-after" pills be made available for purchase without an age restriction, and without a prescription.

The development is the latest in an extended process of shifting emergency contraception to being over-the-counter medication instead of requiring a prescription and being restricted by age.

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