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11:35 am
Mon June 17, 2013

The NFL To Your Purse: Drop Dead

Nichols iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:45 am

Last Thursday, the NFL announced a policy change in which only clear plastic bags would be allowed into stadiums — one per person. Nothing they can't see through. The league says that the change is meant to ensure safety while speeding up security checks and preventing gate backups, which sounds good enough at the outset.

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11:35 am
Mon June 17, 2013

A History Of The World — In One-Liners

Sarah Palin, former governor of Alaska, at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Md.
Pete Marovich Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 11:10 am

Speaking to the Faith & Freedom Coalition's "Road to Majority" Conference on Saturday, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin — in a speech broadcast on C-SPAN — let loose a barrage of bons mots aimed at President Obama and political Washington.

Now that Fox News has re-signed Palin as a commentator, we will likely be hearing a lot more one-liners from the Wit of Wasilla.

In this Twitter Age, in which brevity = wit, we are witnessing the expanding power of one-liners. And the drawbacks.

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What's New?
11:34 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Snowden: NSA Collects 'Everything' Including Content Of Emails

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 12:52 pm

Self-described NSA leaker Edward Snowden has made some stunning allegations during a live chat with The Guardian today.

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4:20 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

A Floating History Of The '18-Wheelers Of Their Day'

The canal schooner Lois McClure is a replica of the boats that carried cargo along northeast waterways in the 1800s.
Sarah Harris NPR

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 3:40 pm

The Lois McClure, a replica of an 1862 canal schooner, is also a floating museum. This summer she's sailing historic waterways in Vermont, New York, Ontario and Quebec, docking in towns for a history lesson.

The Lois starts from her berth at Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes, Vt. First mate Tom Larsen, a strapping guy with a long ponytail and glasses, pulls hand-over-hand on a thick white rope, getting the Lois into the open water. A tugboat comes up alongside the schooner, ties a line and tows her out onto Lake Champlain.

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4:20 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

The Beatles' Defining Moment (Hint: It's Not 'Sgt. Pepper')

The Beatles pose in Liverpool's Derby Square in February 1963 — the year, according to author Colin Fleming, that yielded the band's most definitive work.
Michael Ward Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:15 pm

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4:19 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

The Battered Old Car That Drove My Father's American Dream

Old Goldie lacked heat and air conditioning, smelled bad and rarely started on the first try. But my father loved her anyway.
Kakissis Family Photo

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 4:42 pm

Sometime in 1975, in the first few months after my family moved from Athens, Greece, to Rapid City, S.D., my father bought a junky, gigantic gold Oldsmobile that cost $200.

My sister and I called the car Old Goldie, a name meant to evoke a tough old broad with a glamorous past. My father loved her. It was behind her oversized wheel that he learned — at 40 — to drive.

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2:54 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Dr. Brazelton On Guiding Parents And Learning To Listen

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:17 pm

For the better part of the past century, Dr. T. Berry Brazelton has studied babies, helping change the way we think about and care for them — right from the time they take their first breaths.

The renowned pediatrician hosted the long-running TV show What Every Baby Knows, and has written more than 30 books about child development. Hospitals worldwide rely on his newborn assessment known as the Brazelton scale.

At age 95, he's still going strong.

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5:25 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Water Wars: Who Controls The Flow?

Cattle stand in a heavily irrigated pasture in Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin. The state has ordered ranchers in the region to shut down irrigation. The move is aimed at protecting the rights of Indian tribes who live downstream.
Amelia Templeton for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:39 pm

So often, we take water for granted. We turn on the faucet and there it is. We assume it's our right in America to have water. And yet, water is a resource. It's not always where we need it, or there when we need it.

Rivers don't follow political boundaries — they flow through states and over international borders. And there are endless demands for water: for agriculture, drinking, plumbing, manufacturing, to name just a few. And then there's the ecosystem that depends on water getting downstream.

So what are our legal rights when it comes to water? And who decides?

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8:14 am
Fri June 14, 2013

What Hunter-Gatherers May Tell Us About Modern Obesity

Engineered deliciousness: more of a problem than sedentary lifestyles?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:47 pm

In the wake of the 439 comments on my last post about obesity and weight-bias in our society, I've been thinking about issues of comparative health around the world and, as I have before, about the Paleo diet.

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8:14 am
Fri June 14, 2013

'More Than Honey' Sees A World Without Bees

In More Than Honey, Attica Boa's striking close-up photography helps visualize a story whose urgency needs no amplification: With global honeybee populations threatened, the world's food supply could be seriously endangered.
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:04 pm

An amiably shaggy combination of science lesson, whimsical musing and alarm bell, More Than Honey isn't as urgent as its eco-catastrophic subject — the possible destruction of the world's critically important honeybee populations — might seem to require. But the documentary's most memorable vignette is suitably unnerving: a visit to northern China, where the threatened disappearance of bees has already come to pass, leaving workers to pollinate fruit trees ... by hand.

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