Latest Information:

What's New?

What's New?
9:40 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Medicines To Fight White Plague Are Losing Their Punch

Children with tuberculosis sleep outside at Springfield House Open Air School in London in 1932. Like sanatoriums, these schools offered TB sufferers a place to receive the top treatment of the day: fresh air and sunshine.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:28 am

You probably don't think about tuberculosis much. Why would you? The number of cases in the U.S. is at an all-time low.

But TB has returned with a vengeance in some parts of world, and there have been some troubling outbreaks here at home, too.

Many of the cases come with a deadly twist. They're resistant to standard drugs and can take years of painstaking treatment to bring under control.

Read more
What's New?
3:44 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Small Screen, Big Stories: NPR Comes To Google Glass

NPR developer Michael Seifollahi wears Google Glass while working at his desk.
NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:31 am

This month, NPR has arrived on its smallest screen yet.

One of the more fascinating tech developments of 2013 has been the arrival of Google Glass. The latest in wearable computing, Glass — true to its name — puts mobile technology in a pair of lightweight glasses, complete with Internet connection, apps and a video-ready camera.

Read more
What's New?
3:41 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

These Pictures Might Tempt You To Eat Bugs

Gordon recommends dusting the deep-fried tarantula spider with smoked paprika.
Chugrad McAndrews Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:18 am

Oh, Jiminy Cricket, you've never looked more scrumptious.

The grasshopper kabob is one of several enticing images of insect cuisine included in the new, revised edition of The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook, by avowed entomophagist (i.e., bug eater) David George Gordon.

Read more
What's New?
3:41 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Florida Community Asks Mermaid To Swim Elsewhere

Jenna Conti, also known as Eden Sirene, before being asked to stay out of the water.
Courtesy of Bob Abruzzese

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:27 pm

Jenna Conti just wants to swim.

In her custom-made mermaid costume.

At the Fishhawk Ranch community pools in Tampa, Fla.

But rules are rules, the local development district board says. And the rules say no swim fins in the pools.

So Conti, or Eden Sirene as she's known when she swims, has been left high and dry.

She "just wanted to really show some magic here in Fishhawk," Conti says.

Read more
What's New?
3:40 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

A Comic-Con Diary, Day Zero, Part II: A Man Waits For A Batmobile On Preview Night

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 12:02 pm

Monkey See contributor/longtime nerd Glen Weldon is headed to San Diego Comic-Con. He's filing periodic updates from one of the largest media events in the world.

I am a 45-year-old man standing in line for a toy Batmobile.

Read more
What's New?
3:40 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

What Is 10 Trillion Times More Powerful Than A Heartbeat?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 10:25 am

Read more
What's New?
7:54 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Reading Science: A Story Of Consensus And Community

Located 1,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed.
Spitzer Space Telescope NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. A. Gutermuth

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:18 am

How does science make progress? How do scientists know what they claim to know? What does it mean when scientists say they have come to a consensus?

These questions are far more than academic. We live in a world where issues of science and technology dominate headlines and policy. In that way, science and its claims effect the very real world choices we all face in domains as varied as climate change, genetically modified foods and the uses of Big Data.

Read more
What's New?
7:54 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Alo Brasil's Alex Shaw On The Urbanization Of Samba

Alo Brasil.
Abi Reimold WXPN

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:42 am

Based in Philadelphia, Alo Brasil synthesizes various types of samba, with the hopes of making it a style accessible to American audiences. Alex Shaw, director of Alo Brasil, recently appeared on World Cafe to discuss the exploration of samba as it became an urbanized form.

Here, Shaw takes us through the evolution of samba since the earliest version represented by Samba Chula de Sao Braz. Hear a few of Shaw's picks, including a carnival performance in Rio from 2011.

Read more
What's New?
7:53 am
Wed July 17, 2013

LISTEN: 'Light Warlpiri,' The New Language In Australia

A screen image from a video that professor Carmel O'Shannessy has created. In it, a girl tells a story in "Light Warlpiri," the language O'Shannessy reports she discovered in Australia.
Carmel O'Shannessy

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:00 pm

  • From 'All Things Considered': Carmel O'Shannessy tells Audie Cornish about the origin of 'Light Warlpiri.'

We've all read stories about languages that are dying.

Read more
What's New?
7:53 am
Wed July 17, 2013

WWE Can Now Tag-Team With NSA Versus Leakers

Match outcomes at WWE's Wrestlemania 29 event are just a few of the ones a Reddit user predicted with 100 percent accuracy.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:46 pm

While perhaps not on par with Edward Snowden or Bradley Manning, Reddit user Dolphins1925's leaks could shake up the world of professional wrestling.

Read more

Pages