prison

Women are the fastest-growing prison population group in the United States today -- and the State of Oklahoma, tragically, puts women in prison at twice the national rate. On this edition of ST, we check in with the non-profit organization known as Still She Rises, a public defender office based here in our community that's dedicated to representing North Tulsa mothers within the criminal justice system. Still She Rises, which began operations in Tulsa about a year ago, grew out of a similar group in NYC known as The Bronx Defenders.

"Bobby BlueJacket: The Tribe, The Joint, The Tulsa Underworld" is a just-published book exploring little-known aspects of American crime, Native American identity, and smalltown politics in the 20th century. It's also a biography of a real and remarkable person: Bobby BlueJacket, born in 1930, who grew up amid teenage rumbles, mean streets, dangerous pool halls, and Midwest safecracker crews -- and who actually went from being a career thief to a prison journalist to a Eastern Shawnee Indian activist. Our guests on ST today are Michael P. Daley, the author of this new book, and Mr.

On this installment of ST, our guest is the noted author and journalist Andrea Pitzer, who tells us about her newest book, "One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps." This volume -- which Kirkus, in a starred review, has called "a chilling, well-documented history...of cruelty and dehumanization" -- begins in 1890s Cuba and ends with present-day Guantanamo, covering camps all around the world and throughout modernity.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get to know Robin Steinberg, a New York City-based public defender who founded the nonprofit Bronx Defenders in the late 1990s. This organization is still known for its model of "holistic defense," in which clients are advocated for by an interdisciplinary team of professionals (legal and otherwise) who address the underlying causes as well as the collateral consequences of our criminal-justice system. As Steinberg tells us, in January of this year, the Bronx Defenders opened a smaller-scale satellite office in North Tulsa called Still She Rises.

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The State of Oklahoma continues to top nationwide stats regarding the number of people it incarcerates. According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, our state ranks second in the nation in its rate of incarceration at 700 per every 100,000 people; the national average is 471. Oklahoma also imprisons women at the highest rate in the country -- at a rate that's more than twice the national average. Come early November, voters statewide will consider two initiatives aimed at reversing these shameful and embarrassing trends.

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On this edition of StudioTulsa, we explore the topic of unsettling medical negligence in America's immigrant-only prisons. Our guest is freelance journalist Seth Freed Wessler, whose recent cover story for The Nation in this regard is entitled "This Man Will Almost Certainly Die." As noted in the tag line for this story: "Dozens of men have died in disturbing circumstances in privatized, immigrant-only prisons. The Bureau of Prisons itself says there's a problem.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about Poetic Justice, an ongoing writing project for incarcerated women at the David L. Moss Criminal Justice Center in Tulsa. This writing-workshop program began about 18 months ago and has been very popular from the outset. Our guest is Ellen Stackable, a high school English and World Studies teacher at the Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences, who directs the program and serves as one of its educators.

The State of Oklahoma has one of the highest incarceration rates in the nation. And now, as we set forth on a new school year throughout this community and, indeed, across this state, we pause to ask: What about the children of those incarcerated? Who's assisting the kids, in this moment of great transition, whose parents are behind bars?

As some of us know already, Oklahoma leads the nation, by a lamentably significant margin, in female incarcerations --- and two-thirds of the women in our state's prisons are actually there for non-violent offenses. Today, we hear about on-going efforts to combat this trend. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, Dr. John Schumann, our guest host, learns about Women in Recovery (or WIR), an outpatient incarceration-alternative for women facing long prison sentences for non-violent, drug-related offenses.

Tulsa Convict Escapes from Prison

Jun 11, 2012
Department of Corrections

 Twenty-six year old Damario Love is on the run from William Key Correctional Center in Woodward. He escaped with a fellow inmate early Sunday morning. Sources tell us that both inmates are still on the loose. They have not been seen.

 

Love was serving 10 years for two robbery convictions in Tulsa County.