Popular Culture

As soccer fans --- whoops, make that "football fans" --- everywhere will tell you, the fun gets underway tomorrow. Yes, it's finally upon us: The World Cup.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the distinctive films of writer/director Wes Anderson, whose vivid, detailed, and meticulously crafted movies include "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums," "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," and "Moonrise Kingdom" --- as well as "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is still in theaters nationwide. Our guest is Matt Zoller Seitz, a critic for New York magazine who has a new book out about Anderson's decidedly ornate cinematic world.

Hemingway once noted: "There are two kinds of stories. The ones you live and the ones you make up. And nobody knows the difference. And I don't ever tell which is which." Great writers aren't the only ones who feel compelled to tell stories. It's something we all do. We have to. Doing so makes us human; sharing stories makes life easier, richer, more coherent, more meaningful. On this installment of ST, we learn about a story-driven event for the Tulsa community that's happening this weekend.

"Love and Treasure: A Novel"

Apr 23, 2014

On this installment of ST, we're pleased to speak with Ayelet Waldman, the well-known novelist and essayist whose previous books include "Red Hook Road," "Love and Other Impossible Pursuits," "Daughter's Keeper," and "Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes." Waldman tells us about her newest book, a novel called "Love and Treasure." It's been getting some rave reviews lately --- The Washington Post called it "absorbing [and] moving [and] a marvelous panorama of early-20th-century attitudes about women" --- and it was thus summarized in Booklist: "Classics scholar Jack Wiseman, in the la

The "Collected Poems" of Ron Padgett

Apr 1, 2014

On this installment of ST, we are pleased to welcome Ron Padgett back to our show. This Tulsa-born, New York-based poet, translator, and editor published his "Collected Poems" last fall, and he'll be reading from that book at 7pm tonight (Tuesday the 1st) at the AHHA / Hardesty Arts Center in downtown Tulsa; this event is co-presented by Book Smart Tulsa, Louder Than A Bomb: Tulsa, and This Land Press, and it's free to the public.

"Play ball!" Weather allowing, 26 of the 30 teams that comprise Major League Baseball will be taking the field today. There may have been two games last week in Australia between the Dodgers and Diamondbacks, and a game last night between the Dodgers and Padres, but MLB's Opening Day for 2014 is actually today --- Monday the 31st --- and to mark the beginning of the new season, we at ST are pleased to present (as is our custom) a baseball-driven interview.

On this edition of ST, we're pleased to speak by phone with the terrific jazz singer Rebecca Kilgore, who'll be performing here in Tulsa tomorrow night (Saturday the 29th) in the Emerson Hall at All Souls Unitarian Church. The concert starts at 7pm; tickets (for $20 each) will be sold at the door.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Christopher Bruce, the highly regarded British choreographer and dancer who served as Artistic Director of the Rambert Dance Company from 1994 until 2002. Bruce, whom London's Daily Telegraph once called "the Nureyev of contemporary ballet," was appointed Houston Ballet's Associate Choreographer in 1989, and this world-renowned company has served as his artistic home in America since then.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Jeff Martin, the creator and host of Book Smart Tulsa, the popular reading series here in our city that's now celebrating its fifth anniversary. Book Smart is marking the occasion with three different events this week, on Tuesday the 11th, Thursday the 13th, and Friday the 14th.

"When the mathematician would solve a difficult problem," as Henry David Thoreau once wrote, "he first frees the equation of all incumbrances, and reduces it to its simplest terms. So simplify the problem of life, distinguish the necessary and the real. Probe the earth to see where your main roots run." But how might one do so today, in this ever-hurried, hyper-complicated digital age? Our guests have some answers.

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