Popular Culture

On our show today, a conversation with Micah Fitzerman-Blue, a writer and producer now living in Los Angeles who grew up in Tulsa and attended Holland Hall School (and later, Harvard University). He's probably best known as a writer and producer for the award-winning Amazon television show, "Transparent," starring Jeffrey Tambor and Gaby Hoffmann -- and his first feature film, "The Motel Life," appeared in 2013 and starred Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, and Kris Kristopherson, winning both Best Screenplay and the Audience Award at the Rome Film Festival.

On this edition of ST, we present a fascinating discussion with Dr. Robert Spoo, the Chapman Distinguished Chair at The University of Tulsa College of Law, who has recently been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for 2016 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

(Note: This show first aired last year.) Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Laura Fry, who began her tenure as Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa back in December. Fry previously worked at the Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, Washington, where she was the inaugural Haub Curator of Western American Art. Prior to that post, she served at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming -- first as an education and curatorial assistant, then as a Frederic Remington research assistant.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is Erika Lee, who teaches history at the University of Minnesota, where she's also the Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center. Lee tells us about her widely acclaimed book, "The Making of Asian America: A History" (Simon & Schuster). As was noted of this volume in the pages of The New York Times Book Review: "Sweeping....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "The Vaudeville Museum" -- a special evening of Vaudeville history, perspective, and performance -- that will be staged at TU's McFarlin Library at 7pm both tonight and tomorrow night (the 22nd and 23rd). It's an interactive, interdisciplinary, and free-to-the-public presentation that's recently been created by Machele Miller-Dill, Director of TU's Musical Theatre Program, who also performs in this throwback event and is one of our guests today.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

On this edition of ST, we chat with author Stewart O'Nan about his latest book, "West of Sunset," which is just out in paperback. It's a novel that imagines the final years of F. Scott Fitzgerald's life, when he was living and working in Hollywood in the 1930s...and trying, more or less in vain, to re-capture the literary greatness of his earlier years.

(Note: This show originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, an engaging chat with Shaun Usher, a writer, researcher, and blogger based in the UK. Usher tells us about his latest book, which he edited and compiled: "Lists of Note: An Eclectic Collection Deserving of a Wider Audience." Hailed in the British press as "beautiful and immensely satisfying" (The Observer) and as "1. Splendid. 2. Addictive. 3.

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