Oklahoma Economy

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On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with the president and CEO of the Oklahoma Hospital Association, Craig Jones. About one in three Oklahomans lack adequate health insurance across our state; this means that state hospitals end up administering about $500 million in uncompensated care each year. Why is this the case? And can these numbers be changed? Jones also discusses Oklahoma's refusal to expand Medicaid, and how that decision will affect our hospitals --- as well as its impacts on health outcomes and measurements.

If federal defense cuts of roughly $500 billion go through in 2013, Oklahoma could be vulnerable to job losses as high as 16,000 in the state. State Impact Oklahoma has the story...

State of Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller is to give his take on how the state fared financially in the just-concluded fiscal year.

Miller is to hold a news conference at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Capitol.

The treasurer says he will release information on the state's economic health based on tax revenue collected in June and throughout last fiscal year.

There are some economic trouble spots being indicated in the latest nine-state mid-America region survey. The survey is complied in Omaha at Creighton University. Supervising the project is Doctor Ernie Goss.

The second regular session of the 53rd Oklahoma Legislature (2011-2012) was recently adjourned. (The state legislature will convene for its first regular session of the 54th Oklahoma Legislature [2013-2014] on January 8th, 2013.) With the session now over, many citizens are wondering why the legislature DIDN'T adopt a tax-cut plan. Wasn't this the oft-repeated aim of the GOP-controlled House, Senate, and Governor's Mansion?

Should we --- could we --- really do away with the personal income tax here in Oklahoma? The State Legislature is now considering various proposals to reduce and/or eliminate the state's personal income tax; these proposals are largely based on a study prepared for the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs by economist (and former Reagan administration economic advisor) Arthur Laffer and his colleagues. But what if this study is, in fact, bogus? That's the claim now being made by a number of well-respected economists across the state.