Oklahoma City

Last night, at an event here in Tulsa, Preservation Oklahoma and the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture jointly announced the 2016 list of the state's Most Endangered Places. The list includes the Oklahoma State Capitol Building as well as two locations in Tulsa: the Oklahoma Iron Works Building (just northeast of downtown) and the mid-century Abundant Life Building (near 18th and Boulder). However, the ten sites on this year's list are not the only historic-preservation sites endangered in our state.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a documentary film that will be screened tonight (Thursday the 11th) in Helmerich Hall on the TU campus. The screening is free to the public, and it will also feature a panel discussion; it begins at 7pm. The film is question is "Children of the Civil Rights," and our guest is Julia Clifford, who directed it. As noted of this film at the "Children of the Civil Rights" website: "No one knew a group of children in Oklahoma City were heroes; not even the children themselves.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, a discussion with Ziva Branstetter, the Enterprise Editor at the Tulsa World, where she's also the lead reporter for a three-part series of articles called "Quake Debate." The first of these articles appeared yesterday in that newspaper, and the second is in today's World.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with the Oklahoma City-based artist and curator, Nathan Lee. Lee is the curator of "Noir," a newly opened group show at the Living Arts space in downtown Tulsa which includes work from a number of different African-American artists from throughout Oklahoma --- and which will be on exhibit through July 11th. As is noted of this show at the Living Arts of Tulsa website: "'Noir' is an examination of the shifting definition of Black culture.