Oklahoma Center for the Humanities (at TU)

On this edition of ST, we speak with Herb Boyd, an award-winning journalist and historian who's also the author of several books on black history and activism, including biographies of James Baldwin and Sugar Ray Robinson; his latest book is a remarkable 300-year history of African-American life and politics in his hometown of Detroit. Boyd, who now teaches at the City College of New York, will be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight, the 12th, at 7pm here at TU.

Turkey has been a vital U.S. ally for many years, but is that going to change in the Age of Trump? And for that matter, what do -- or don't -- Presidents Trump and Erdogan have in common? On this edition of ST, we speak with Mahir Zeynalov, a noted Turkish journalist, media analyst, and press-freedom advocate. Zeynalov is now based in Washington, DC, as he was deported from his homeland in 2014 by the Turkish Interior Ministry; he is well-known for his writing, which appears in Al Arabiya, The Huffington Post, and other publications.

When did names like Fat Tire and Sam Adams become as familiar -- in certain circles -- as the names Bud, Miller, and Coors? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the craft beer movement (or should we say craze?) in America today -- how it began, why (and where) it has caught on, and how it relates to key concepts like race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Our guest is J. Nikol Beckham of Randolph College in Virginia, where she is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies specializing in such pop-culture fixtures as television, popular music, and food.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Philip Howard, a professor of community sustainability at Michigan State University. He's also president of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and is a member of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems.

On this edition of ST, we offer a discussion of the life and work of Thomas Nast (1840-1902), who is commonly thought of as "the father of American political cartooning." Highly influential in his time and still admired by artists, columnists, writers, and cartoonists today, Nast might be best known for his work -- done before, during, and after the Civil War -- for Harper's Weekly. He also, quite famously, created the modern illustrated version of Santa Claus...as well as the elephant as a symbol for the G.O.P. Our guest is Dr.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "The Vaudeville Museum" -- a special evening of Vaudeville history, perspective, and performance -- that will be staged at TU's McFarlin Library at 7pm both tonight and tomorrow night (the 22nd and 23rd). It's an interactive, interdisciplinary, and free-to-the-public presentation that's recently been created by Machele Miller-Dill, Director of TU's Musical Theatre Program, who also performs in this throwback event and is one of our guests today.

On this installment of ST, an interesting discussion with Whitney Phillips, an Assistant Professor of Literary Studies and Writing at Mercer University's Penfield College.

Our guest on ST is Dr. William D. Adams, who became the 10th Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) last year. The NEH -- along with the National Endowment for the Arts -- is now marking its 50th anniversary, and thus Dr. Adams is making appearances all over the nation to celebrate the NEH's accomplishments while also explaining its goals, purposes, and various initiatives.

Today is the unofficial holiday known as Bloomsday -- a day meant to celebrate, at gatherings large and small across the globe, the life and work of the modernist Irish writer James Joyce. Why today, you ask? Because all the events related in Joyce's "Ulysses" -- seen by many readers and critics as the greatest novel ever penned in English -- take place on June 16th (and specifically on June 16th, 1904) in and around Dublin, Ireland.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to welcome John Erling, known and appreciated by many local radio listeners for his three decades on the air at KRMG. Five years ago, Erling inaugurated Voices of Oklahoma, an oral history website dedicated to caputing the life stories of Oklahomans from all walks of life. As Erling tells us today, what began as basically a part-time retirement project has now grown into full-blown, ongoing passion for the Tulsa radio icon.

Our guest today on StudioTulsa is D.T. Max, a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine who's also the author of "Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace," a highly regarded literary biography which first appeared a few years ago.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Professor Sean Latham of the University of Tulsa. He's the Chair of the Faculty of English; he's also the Walter Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Editor of James Joyce Quarterly, and Director of the newly created Oklahoma Center for the Humanities (which is based here at TU).