NPR

Meg Kelly/NPR

On the first anniversary of President Trump’s election, NPR is looking back at his victory speech. NPR reporters across the newsroom have annotated his election night remarks, providing context and analysis to his policy promises and noting who among the people he thanked are still in the inner circle a year later.

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Today marks 70 years of Public Radio Tulsa! 

On October 19, 1947 KWGS hit the airwaves as one of the first FM stations in Oklahoma. We since have evolved into the stations you love today: KWGS Public Radio 89.5 and KWTU Classical 88.7. You can tune in 24/7 - 365 days a year to hear great journalism and unforgettable music.
 
We recently celebrated with two special events on September 30, 2017. Scott Horsley, NPR’s White House Correspondent, was our honorary guest. 

What's a "typical day at the office" like for a reporter who's been assigned to cover the White House? How often do presidents traveling on Air Force One actually stroll to the back of the plane and chat with journalists? How much prep work goes (or doesn't go) into the annual White House Turkey Pardon, just before Thanksgiving? On this edition of ST, we listen to a "Public Radio Tulsa Give and Take" conversation that was recorded recently, on Saturday the 30th.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Richard Harris, a longtime science reporter at NPR, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions." As was noted of this alarming and well-regarded new book by Kirkus Reviews: "An award-winning science journalist reports that research in the biomedical sciences is too often guilty of wasting time and money and, worse than that, actually slowing scientific progress and misinforming the public.

The event series you loved last season is back! And we are kicking off the 2017/2018 season of The Give and Take with Scott Horsley, NPR White House Correspondent, in honor of our 70th Anniversary

NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation tonight, beginning at 8:00 p.m. Central, on U.S. engagement and "the path forward" in Afghanistan and South Asia. Senior U.S. officials tell NPR that the president is expected to order about 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. The decision follows months of deliberation within the Trump Administration, involving top military commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war. 

Listen LIVE on Public Radio 89.5.

Romeo Durscher/NASA

Join Here and Now hosts Robin Young and Meghna Chakrabarti from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Monday, August 21, 2017 as the eclipse crosses the country. They’ll hear from eclipse chasers, scientists, first time observers and reporters across the nation. Tune in to Public Radio 89.5 or LISTEN LIVE HERE

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Romeo Durscher/NASA

Live Map -- Total Solar Eclipse Crosses The U.S.
The excitement has been building for weeks and weeks. On Monday, August 21st the solar eclipse will finally be here. It will darken the skies along a path from Oregon to South Carolina. It's the first eclipse that will be seen from coast to coast in 99 years. Millions will don special glasses or watch through pinhole projectors. Eclipse enthusiasts say totality never disappoints. Follow this live updating map tracking the position of the eclipse across the United States.

We are officially SOLD OUT! Thank you to everyone attending. We look forward to seeing you on September 30! If you would still like the opportunity to see Scott Horsley live, please join us at The Give and Take!

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Public Radio Tulsa and The University of Tulsa cordially invite you to AN EVENING WITH SCOTT HORSLEY, NPR White House Correspondent

Meet Scott Horsley

Jul 12, 2017
NPR by Steve Barret

 

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Trump Administration.

Horsley took up the White House beat in 2009 after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Richard Harris, a longtime science reporter at NPR, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions." As was noted of this alarming and well-regarded new book by Kirkus Reviews: "An award-winning science journalist reports that research in the biomedical sciences is too often guilty of wasting time and money and, worse than that, actually slowing scientific progress and misinforming the public.

John Lew, The University of Tulsa

Last Thursday, October 20th, we had the pleasure of hosting Jarl Mohn, President and CEO of NPR for a coffee and dessert reception in the Faculty Study of TU's McFarlin Library. Mr. Mohn is on a cross-country journey to visit 30-plus NPR member stations. Thank you, Mr. Mohn, for sharing the vision of NPR, the importance of member station partnerships, and stories from the road!

 

The StoryCorps Mobile Recording Booth has returned to Tulsa; it will be parked at the Guthrie Green in Downtown Tulsa from today (Thursday the 16th) through November 15th. How does it work, you ask? Well, people come in pairs to interview family members, friends, mentors, and loved ones; StoryCorps is all about everyday people sitting down together to ask or answer life's important questions. It's a vast and far-flung oral history project like no other; after all StoryCorps interviews are completed, the recordings are archived at the Library of Congress for generations to come.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the multi-faceted, multi-talented Amy Krouse Rosenthal. She's written more than 20 books for children, and her popular adult book of 2005, "Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life," was named by Amazon as one of the top ten memoirs of the previous decade. Rosenthal has also created several widely viewed videos (as seen on YouTube and elsewhere) --- among them "The Beckoning of Lovely," "The Money Tree," and "Life Is a Marathon" --- and some of these videos have gone viral online.

The Women of NPR

Mar 8, 2012
NPR / The Daily Beast

{The Daily Beast} You’re familiar with the stereotype: humorless, ever so slightly imperious, Birkenstock-wearing brown-rice enthusiasts.