Nonfiction

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author and journalist John Sedgwick, whose many books range from a psychological thriller, "The Dark House," to a multi-generational family memoir, "In My Blood." He joins us to talk about his newest book, a work of popular history entitled "War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation." Interestingly, Sedgwick has an ancestor who actually knew both Hamilton and Burr quite well, and it was his own research into the life and work of that ancestor which first led Sedgwick to think of writing this book.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

Our guest on today's StudioTulsa is the Oregon-based author Craig Ryan, who tells us about his new book, just out from Liveright: "Sonic Wind: The Story of John Paul Stapp and How a Renegade Doctor Became the Fastest Man on Earth." This biography offers readers, per a starred review in Kirkus, "[the] remarkable, almost-forgotten story of an aerospace pioneer....

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Erik Larson, the bestselling nonfiction writer whose page-turning historical narratives include "The Devil in the White City," "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin," and (most recently) "Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania." This last named book -- exploring the events before, during, and after the 1915 sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania -- is the main thrust of our conversation, although Larson also speaks about how he locates, happens upon, researches, and writes his remarkable stories.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion with Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, which originally aired back in May. Inskeep tells us about his book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "Inskeep [offers] a review of the forces and events leading to the expulsion of the Cherokees from their ancestral homelands.... In this lively narrative aimed at general readers, the author carefully avoids demonizing or patronizing his main characters.

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

On this edition of ST, an engaging chat with Shaun Usher, a writer, researcher, and blogger based in the U.K. Usher tells us about his new book, just out, which he edited and compiled: "Lists of Note: An Eclectic Collection Deserving of a Wider Audience." Hailed in the British press as "beautiful and immensely satisfying" (The Observer) and as "1. Splendid. 2. Addictive. 3.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the writer J.C. Hallman, who was raised in Southern California, studied at the University of Pittsburgh and the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and now teaches at Oklahoma State University.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his new book: "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town, and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history. In particular, Auchmutey depicts the life and times of one Greg Wittkamper, a student at the school who came from a nearby Christian commune that devoutly and publicly (and often quite dangerously) supported racial equality.

Pages