Nonfiction

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Joe Johnston, who's originally from Missouri, and who's written many books over the years on various topics. He joins us to talk about his newest publication, a folksy, far-ranging, and conversational history of Southern cooking -- from sun tea and fruitcake and vegetables to "the Colonel's chicken" and BBQ and beyond.

Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self." As was noted of this book by Alexandre Rossi (the author of "A Dog at the Keyboard"): "It's refreshing to finally find a book that takes into consideration the many predispositions to behavior problems in dogs.

This coming Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, the Helmerich Center for American Research here in Tulsa will present "Dislocations and Migrations," an interdisciplinary symposium of academics, activists, archivists, curators, librarians, and other experts -- all of them exploring ideas of displacement, departure, arrival, relocation, removal, escape, and so on. Our guest on ST, the journalist Jessica Bruder, will be the keynote speaker at this upcoming gathering.

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, Dr. David Palma is our guest. He is a Canadian radiation oncologist and cancer researcher who focuses on the treatment of lung, head/neck, and metastatic cancers -- and he tells us about his new book, which is just out: "Taking Charge of Cancer: What You Need to Know to Get the Best Treatment." As was noted by Dr. Tony Mok of the Chinese University of Hong Kong: "If you use a guidebook for a journey, you will need [this book] for a cancer journey.

Our guest is the accomplished nonfiction writer, journalist, and essayist, Anna Badkhen, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow at work on her first novel. She joins us to discuss her book, "Fisherman's Blues: A West African Community at Sea," a detailed and engaging volume just recently published. Per the Dallas Morning News: "In elegiac vignettes, Badkhen portrays the trick and snare of a heroic and punishing profession....

It's been commonly noted that we as human beings are basically hard-wired for long walks -- and for the thinking, observation, and spiritual reflection that always comes with such walks. Henry David Thoreau, for example, believed that walking alone through the woods was in itself a remedy for most of life's problems. Another such person might be the journalist and storyteller Steve Watkins, who's our guest on ST. In his new book, "Pilgrim Strong: Rewriting My Story on the Way of St.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Eric Schlosser, the well-regarded American journalist and filmmaker whose bestselling books include "Fast Food Nation" (2001), "Reefer Madness" (2003), "Chew on This" (2006), and "Command and Control" (2013). This last-named title reveals the details of America's ongoing efforts to prevent nuclear weapons from being stolen, sabotaged, or detonated by accident.

It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. John Bargh, a social psychologist at Yale who's widely seen as a leading expert on the unconscious mind. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Library Journal: "Although the work [in this book] is girded with years of studies and research, humor and use of personal anecdotes keep the writing accessible.

Our guest is Tom Clavin, the popular historian whose latest book, "Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West," is just out in paperback. As was noted of this book by the Houston Press: "Thorough, compelling, and entertaining.... Clavin sprinkles in fascinating tidbits about life and culture in the Old West.... In 'Dodge City,' Clavin vividly re-creates a time, a town, and an era that it seems incomprehensible occurred less than 150 years ago.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a conversation with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, which is located in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. A well-regarded expert on how childhood stress can lead to adult disease, Dr. Harris speaks with us about her new book, "The Deepest Well." We also learn about how and why Dr. Harris -- a pediatrician by training -- was the subject of a game-changing 2011 profile in The New Yorker Magazine.

Americans are less and less in agreement these days -- polarization, as we all know, has become a buzzword...and an omnipresent reality. But if there's one thing everyone agree on, it's that Washington, DC, is broken. How can it be fixed? Our guest is Joseph A. Califano, Jr., who spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a discussion from July with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The small Vermont town of Norwich (population 3,000 or so) has quite possibly produced more Olympic athletes per capita than any other location in the United States. How has this community done so? What's their secret? Our guest on ST, Karen Crouse -- a sportswriter who's been on the staff of The New York Times since 2005 -- set out to answer this question.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interview that stems from three rather alarming facts. One: About 10 percent of Americans are implanted with medical devices (such as pacemakers, artificial hips, cardiac stents, and so on). Two: The overwhelming majority of high-risk implanted devices in the U.S. have never undergone a single clinical trial. And three: Medical interventions have become the third leading cause of death in America. What in the world, you might ask, is going on here?

(Note: This interview originally appeared in September of last year.) We offer a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

For a number of different (and often unsettling) reasons, issues of race and racism have by now come into focus in American life in a pervasive manner that we, as a society, have not seen in decades. Or maybe, actually, we as a nation have never been as racially aware -- or alert -- as we are at this moment.

On this edition of our show, we revisit our interesting November 2017 dialogue with Dr. Matthew Walker about his book, "Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams." As per The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a thoughtful tour through the still dimly understood state of being asleep.... [This] is a book on a mission. Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too. And it is urgent.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl. A retired librarian, bestselling author, literary critic, and former Tulsan, Nancy, now based in Seattle, is a well-known reading advocate who was named the 2011 Librarian of the Year by Library Journal.

Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen? On this edition of ST, we're talking about various AI-related matters with Amir Husain, an inventor and computer scientist whose new book is called "The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence." As was noted of this book by Prof.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a new book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" vividly documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. James W. Mold, who recently retired from the faculty at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in OKC, where he'd worked since 1984. While there, Dr. Mold also completed a fellowship in Geriatric Medicine as well as a Master of Public Health degree.

On this edition of ST, we speak with David Hallberg -- the first American to join the famed Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow as a principal dancer, and one whom The New Yorker once described as "the most exciting male dancer in the western world." Hallberg, now based in NYC, has a new memoir out, which he talks with us about.

Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a new book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

Our guest is Helen Thorpe, a Denver-based journalist and author whose newest book, just out, is called "The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom." As noted of this work in a starred review from Publishers Weekly: "The latest work of narrative nonfiction from Thorpe ('Soldier Girls') brings readers face to face with the global refugee crisis through the story of a Denver English-acquisition class composed of teenage refugees from all over the world.

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