Nonfiction

On today's StudioTulsa -- that is, on Tax Day 2017 -- we are joined by T.R.

On this installment of ST, the bestselling writer Jonathan Lethem is our guest. He's well-known for such celebrated novels as "Dissident Gardens," "The Fortress of Solitude," and "Motherless Brooklyn." He joins us to discuss his latest book, just out now, which is a gathering of nonfiction pieces. It's called "More Alive and Less Lonely: On Books and Writers." It's an impressive collection of 50+ essays, some of them previously published and some newly written.

On this edition of our program, we listen back to wonderful discussion about raising kids from last summer. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Ross W. Greene, an author, speaker, and child psychologist who was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over twenty years. He told us about his then-new book, "Raising Human Beings: Creating a Collaborative Partnership with Your Child." You can learn more about this book, and can hear a free, on-demand audio-stream of our chat with Dr.

Our guest is Prof. Barry Friedman, who is the Fuchsberg Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and the director of the Policing Project. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission." As noted of this widely acclaimed study in a starred review in Kirkus: "A law professor diagnoses the ills of American policing and prescribes a healthy dose of sunlight. 'Policing in the United States -- from the overzealous beat cop all the way to the NSA -- is out of control,' writes Friedman, and the fault lies not with the police but with us.

On this edition of our show, we welcome Dr. Roger Horowitz, author of "Kosher USA: How Coke Bacame Kosher and Other Tales of Modern Food." Dr. Horowitz will offer a free-to-the-public presentation about this book tomorrow night, Thursday the 2nd, at 7pm here in Tulsa. The event happens at Congregation B'nai Emunah, at 1719 South Owasso.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

On this edition of ST, our guest is psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker. He joins us to discuss his book, "War Torn: Stories of Courage, Love, and Resilience." With 200 million people affected by armed conflict or genocide worldwide, refugees are appearing in record numbers; indeed, not since World War II have so many war-affected migrants been relocating around the globe.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Giles Milton back to our show; he's a British historian and author whose many books include "Nathaniel's Nutmeg" and "When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost His Brain." He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is called "Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat." As was noted of this exciting work of history by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] an elegant presentation of Winston Churchill’s special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war....

On this edition of our show, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his new book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

We are joined on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday by Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for more than two decades. Her previous book was "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine," and she joins us to discuss her new book, which follows up on that one.

Our guest is Edward Baptist, a professor at Cornell University, who will soon give the 2017 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here at TU. (This free-to-the-public event happens on Monday the 6th, beginning at 7pm; you'll find more information here.) Prof.

Our guest is Helen Czerski, who is a physicist at University College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering as well as science presenter for the BBC. She chats with us about her new book, "Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "In this delightful pop science title, Czerski, a physicist at University College London, shows that understanding how the universe works requires little more than paying attention to patterns and figuring out increasingly refined ways to explain them.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation." As the historian Eric Foner recently wrote of this book in The New York Times: "Fuller...is [previously] the author of a prize-winning study of the Civil War's impact on American literature.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Frances McCall Rosenbluth, a Professor of Political Science at Yale University and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the co-author of a new book called "Forged Through Fire: War, Peace, and the Democratic Bargain," which she discusses with us. As was noted in a starred review of this book by Kirkus, this is a "sometimes-counterintuitive but always fascinating interrogation of the history and uses of war....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer a chat with Douglas Miller, the principal behind Müllerhaus Legacy, a Tulsa-based firm that creates books and other publications on-demand for private organizations and special occasions. A graphic artist and book designer by trade, Miller is also, in fact, a writer, since a book for which he's the lead author has just recently appeared.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) On this installment of ST, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

What is meant by the term "placebo effect"? What exactly is being described, and how is it brought about? And is this term a medical reality? Does it actually -- that is, scientifically -- exist? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we hear from journalist Erik Vance, whose writing has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, Scientific American, and other publications.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Amy Haimerl, a professor of journalism at Michigan State University who writes about small business and urban policy for Fortune, Reuters, The New York Times, and other outlets.

(Note: This interview originally aired in late June.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are joined by Cheryl Waldeck, a local author, consultant, and culinary whiz whose previous book, "The Joy of Food," offered more than 100 recipies that she'd compiled over 30+ years. That book, as she tells us, grew out of a desire to pass along to her adult kids the "how to" details for the various dishes they'd grown up eating (and loving) in the Waldeck home. Now comes a new book, "Occasions: Seasonal Menus and Entertaining Secrets," which Waldeck describes for us today.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer. She's a Seattle-based bestselling author and retired librarian, and she used to work as a bookseller (decades ago) here in Tulsa. A tireless book advocate and literary critic -- and perhaps the only librarian ever to be fashioned and sold as an action figure -- Nancy can also be heard occasionally recommending books on NPR's Morning Edition. She talked with us about the following titles, all of which she thinks would make great gifts this holiday season:

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) It's a straightforward fact, yet it's also frequently overlooked or dismissed: the great majority of premature deaths in this country can be prevented through changes in diet and lifestyle. Now comes a bestselling book that describes these changes while also explaining how such nutritional modifications can sometimes do more for us than prescription meds, other pharmaceuticals, and surgical procedures. Our guest is Dr. Michael Greger, author of "How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease." As Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in July.) On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Penn, a British writer and journalist whose books include "It's All About the Bike," a bestselling memoir of craftsmanship. Penn joins us to speak out his new book, just out from W.W. Norton, which is called "The Man Who Made Things Out of Trees." As is noted of this book at the Norton website: "Out of all the trees in the world, the ash is most closely bound up with who we are: the tree we have made the greatest and most varied use of over the course of human history.

(Note: This interview first aired back in July.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Susan Senator, a writer, activist, and longtime advocate for people with autism.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author Peter Cozzens, who has written several acclaimed books on the Civil War and the American West. He chats with us about his newest book, which is just out: "The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West." Per Douglas Brinkley, writing for The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a detailed recounting of random carnage, bodies burned, treaties broken, and treachery let loose across the land.... Cozzens admirably succeeds in framing the Indian Wars with acute historical accuracy....

On this edition of our program, we speak with Ian Scheffler, who has written for The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. His first book, just out, is a nonfiction text called "Cracking the Cube: Going Slow to Go Fast and Other Unexpected Turns in the World of Competitive Rubik's Cube Solving." As one Erno Rubik -- the inventor of the famous cube -- has noted of this book: "Scheffler provides the first comprehensive book on the global phenomenon of speedcubing.

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