Native Americans

Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, is our guest today on StudioTulsa. He tells us all about his new book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." As the noted historian H.W. Brands has observed of this book: "History is complicated, and in its complications lies its appeal. Steve Inskeep understands this, and his elegantly twinned account of Andrew Jackson and John Ross shows just how complicated and appealing history can be.

Our guest on ST is cultural anthropologist Christina E. Burke, who is the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

From just after WWII until the late 1970s, the Indian Annual exhibition at Tulsa's Philbrook Museum of Art served as a vital outlet -- and a nationally recognized showcase -- for Native American fine art. This juried competition and sale attracted artists, collectors, and curators from across the country for more than three decades. It also helped build the collections of institutions like Philbrook, the Heard Museum (AZ), and the Museum of the American Indian (NY), all of which consistently purchased award-winning pieces at this show.

The "Rediscover Gilcrease" weekend -- a two-day, free-to-the-public gala happening at the museum on September 6th and 7th -- will feature unique attractions, special activities, and lots of family-friendly entertainment. Among the highlights, without question, will be the official opening of the striking new Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease. Several different lectures and presentations will be presented at the Helmerich Center, and one of them will be given by our guest today. Our guest is Brian Hosmer, the H.G.

This edition of SToH presents an interesting discussion about the "food insecurity" affecting so many Native American individuals, families, and communities today, here in Oklahoma and all over the nation. Addressing this insecurity --- and the serious and widespread health issues stemming from it --- is no easy task, and we meet a locally based public-health researcher, filmmaker, activist, and advocate who's taking a deliberately multifaceted approach in doing so. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Suzan Shown Harjo, a noted poet, lecturer, curator, and policy advocate. She'll soon be in our community to participate in the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival, which runs from Friday the 31st through Sunday the 2nd at the Glenpool Conference Center; Dr. Harjo will serve as the poet-in-residence at this festival.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing a soon-to-open exhibit at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa, "Buffalo Bill's Wild West Warriors: Photographs by Gertrude Käsebier," which will go on view Sunday, November 24th. Our guest is Michelle Delaney, director of the Consortium for Understanding the American Experience at the Smithsonian Institution.

The Osage ballet, "Wahzhazhe," had its premiere last summer here in Oklahoma; it was first conceived of about four years ago, and was originally inspired by a suite of music by Lou Brock, an Osage composer. This contemporary ballet brings together certain special qualities of Osage history and culture: a reverence for classical ballet (which was, of course, the legacy of two famous Osage ballerinas, Maria and Marjorie Tallchief) and a deep respect also for the richness of Osage traditional music, dance, and textile arts.

Over the past four decades, the efforts of the Cherokee Freedman to gain full tribal rights within the Cherokee Nation have, by turns, burned or simmered, so to speak; today, this issue is now being pushed back and forth in our federal court system. On this installment of ST, a review of such matters as we welcome back to our program Hannibal B. Johnson, a Tulsa-based author, attorney, and human-rights activist. Johnson tells us about his new book, "Apartheid in Indian Country?

The Best of ST in 2012: Joy Harjo

Jan 2, 2013

Happy New Year, folks. On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to an engaging chat from October, when we spoke with the noted poet, musician, and storyteller Joy Harjo.

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