Native American

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author Peter Cozzens, who has written several acclaimed books on the Civil War and the American West. He chats with us about his newest book, which is just out: "The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West." Per Douglas Brinkley, writing for The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a detailed recounting of random carnage, bodies burned, treaties broken, and treachery let loose across the land.... Cozzens admirably succeeds in framing the Indian Wars with acute historical accuracy....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the author, scholar, and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, who grew up in rural Oklahoma and is now based in San Francisco. She is the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother, and she's been active in the international Indigenous People's Movement for more than four decades.

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council has passed an act that requires specific Cherokee Nation executive positions to be held by enrolled tribal citizens.

The council approved the measure Monday on a 9-8 vote.

The positions are general counsel, chief of staff, communications director, government relations director and chief executive officer of Cherokee Nation Businesses.

Native American News

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma has been named the director of the Indian Affairs Office of Budget Management in Washington D.C.

Thomas Thompson was selected for the post by acting Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Donald Laverdure.

Thompson is currently the senior advisor to the area director of the Indian Health Service in Phoenix, Arizona.

Laverdure said in a statement that Thompson will help find efficient and cost-effective ways to provide services in Indian Country.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Federal Trade Commission has filed a lawsuit against several Oklahoma tribes, claiming their payday loan companies are operating illegally.

The commission filed the complaint Monday against payday loan firms operated by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. The complaint alleges that the companies would make repeated small withdrawals from customers' accounts — while charging a fee each time. According to The Oklahoman, one customer was charged $675 in fees to pay off a $300 loan.