Photo Credit: Wendy Mutz

On this edition of our show, we learn about a newly created original musical called "Pryor Rendering," which is being staged from today, the 13th, through Sunday, the 16th, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center (at 2nd and Cincinnati). Tulsa's American Theatre Company has joined forces with the Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre and the University of Oklahoma to create this work. It's a coming-of-age story about a young boy who struggles with his loneliness, his sexuality, and his father's absence, and it's adapted from a novel by Tulsa native Gary Reed.

(Note: This show first aired last year.) Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the highly regarded theatrical director David Schweizer, who's currently in town to direct Tulsa Opera's staging of Andre Previn's "A Streetcar Named Desire" (happening on Friday the 4th and Sunday the 6th).

On this installment of ST, we learn about "The Vaudeville Museum" -- a special evening of Vaudeville history, perspective, and performance -- that will be staged at TU's McFarlin Library at 7pm both tonight and tomorrow night (the 22nd and 23rd). It's an interactive, interdisciplinary, and free-to-the-public presentation that's recently been created by Machele Miller-Dill, Director of TU's Musical Theatre Program, who also performs in this throwback event and is one of our guests today.

Last fall, about 40 local non-profit arts organizations joined Phil Lakin, CEO of the Tulsa Community Foundation, in launching Arts Alliance Tulsa (or AAT), a United Arts Fund that aims to provide funding for -- and audience-development support for -- the City of Tulsa's various cultural assets. (United Arts Funds, as noted at the AAT website, "seek to raise money to provide ongoing operating support to local arts institutions. Over the past 65 years, more than 100 communities across the country -- both large and small -- have established UAFs.

On this edition of ST, a chat with Bruce Adolphe, the New York-based pianist and composer who's probably best known for his long-running gig as "The Piano Puzzler" on the classical public-radio show, Performance Today. He'll be giving a free-to-the-public address on Saturday the 14th in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus; the talk begins at 7pm and will focus on humor in music.

On today's ST, we learn about a new musical -- a "bro-mantic" comedy, no less -- loosely based on the thousand-year-old epic poem, "Beowulf." It's the still-in-development "Beowulf, Lord of the Bros," and it will be workshopped at a pair of free-to-the-public performances on Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, at the Theatre Two space in Kendall Hall on the TU campus, with both shows starting at 7pm.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the critically acclaimed singer and actor Jason Graae, who has starred on Broadway in "A Grand Night for Singing," "Falsettos," "Stardust," and "Snoopy!" -- among other shows -- and has appeared Off-Broadway in such hits as "Forever Plaid," "Olympus on My Mind," "All in the Timing," and more. A comic performer with a strong voice and a broad range of abilities, Graae, who actually grew up in Tulsa, has also appeared in various operas, and has done several one-man shows and cabaret concerts nationwide over the years.

On this installment of ST, we chat with Marcello Angelini, artistic director of Tulsa Ballet. The company will soon present "The Taming of the Shrew" at the Tulsa PAC, with performances scheduled for October 23rd, 24th, and 25th. As noted of this production at the Tulsa Ballet website: "Shakespeare's famous comedy springs to life through masterful choreography by the legendary John Cranko, with music by Domenico Scarlatti freely arranged by Kurt-Heinz Stolze.

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing series of interviews with organizations vying to be included in the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. This extension is expected to go before voters in the spring of 2016, and over the past couple of months, many area organizations (from Gilcrease Museum to the Tulsa Zoo; from Tulsa Transit to Langston University) have been presenting proposals in this regard to the Tulsa City Council. We at StudioTulsa are speaking with certain of those groups whose ideas seem especially interesting and/or feasible.

Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

This coming weekend, on both Saturday the 10th and Sunday the 11th, Tulsa Opera will present Tulsa Youth Opera’s production of composer Susan Kander's "The Giver." This piece, as noted at the Tulsa Opera website, is "an opera for young people based on the bestselling novel by Lois Lowry. 'The Giver' tells the story of a seemingly utopian society free from pain or strife, but also devoid of color and memory.

One week from tonight, on August 8th, Theatre Tulsa will unveil its much-anticipated new production of the epic musical, "Les Misérables," which will run in the Tulsa PAC's John H. Williams Theatre through August 24th. The rights for "Les Mis" -- a favorite, of course, of countless musical theatre buffs worldwide -- have only recently been made available to community theatre organizations, and Theatre Tulsa will open its 92nd season with this epic. The production will feature a cast of 70+ people in a 13-performance run.

On this edition of ST, we're pleased to welcome Rebecca Ungerman back to our program. She has long been known and admired as one of the outstanding jazz/cabaret singers in the Tulsa community. She's also a wonderful songwriter, and her original musical, "The Unwitting Wife," was first staged about two years ago here in town (and was thereafter staged in Israel).

Our guest is James Peterson, the James Beard Award-winning food writer, cookbook author, photographer, and cooking teacher who started his career as a restaurant cook in Paris in the 1970s. He's written more than a dozen cooking guides and recipe books over the years, including "Sauces," "Fish & Shellfish," "Meat: A Kitchen Education," and "Cooking." His newest book, just out, is called "Done.: A Cook's Guide to Knowing When Food Is Perfectly Cooked," and Peterson joins us today to discuss this volume.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the remarkable singer-songwriter, actor, and activist Holly Near, who'll perform with the folk duo known as Emma's Revolution --- as well as pianist Jan Martinelli -- on Friday night (the 11th) at 7:30pm at the All Souls Unitarian Church in Tulsa, at 2952 South Peoria. Near is well-known for writing such classic modern-day folk anthems as "It Could Have Been Me" and "Singing For Our Lives" --- and for appearing in several notable films, plays, and TV programs over the years.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Hunter Bell and Jana Ellis, who are both involved with "[title of show]," the Tony-nominated one-act musical that is currently being staged at the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company.

Our guest on this installment of ST is Cody Daigle, the resident playwright with Playhouse Tulsa. Originally from Louisiana and now based here in T-Town, Daigle is a witty and engaging actor/director/playwright who's had his plays produced in New Orleans, North Carolina, NYC, Iowa, and elsewhere. His newest play is a musical comedy called "Tulsa! A Radio Christmas Spectacular," and it will be staged at the Tulsa PAC by Playhouse Tulsa --- with original songs by the outstanding Tulsa songbird Rebecca Ungerman --- on Thursday the 5th through Sunday the 8th.

LOOK Musical Theatre, a revered nonprofit that began as the Gilbert & Sullivan Society of Tulsa (with "LOOK" later signifying Light Opera Oklahoma) is currently marking its 30th season; the organization was founded in 1983 by John and Jane Carmichael Everitt in association with The University of Tulsa. Every June, LOOK presents professional performances in repertory fashion; these shows are produced and staffed by dozens of professionals: artistic, technical, and marketing personnel from regions both local and national.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back Machele Miller Dill, an assistant professor of musical theatre here at the University of Tulsa. Dill is directing "Spring Awakening," which the TU Department of Theatre will present in the Lorton Performance Center (here on the TU campus) from tomorrow night (the 11th) through Sunday afternoon (the 14th).

On February 23rd, March 1st, and March 3rd, Tulsa Opera will present Frank Loesser's masterful "Broadway opera" --- as some have called it --- "The Most Happy Fella," with all three performances happening at the Tulsa PAC. A classic American musical that dates back to the middle 1950s, "The Most Happy Fella" is the show that gave us the beloved pop tunes "Standing on the Corner" and "Big D." Our guest on StudioTulsa is the internationally renowned baritone --- and current associate professor of voice at the University of Oklahoma --- Kim Josephson, who stars in this production.

We are pleased to welcome to StudioTulsa the inimitable Rebecca Ungerman, the great Tulsa-based jazz and cabaret singer and performer who's been a beloved diva / chanteuse / force of nature on our local music scene for the past twenty years or so. Ungerman is taking her newest show --- an original musical, called "The Unwitting Wife," which includes new as well as older songs (some of which date back to her first recordings or earliest efforts at songwriting) --- to Israel, of all places, for a series of performances.

Our guest on ST is Gary John LaRosa, who will be the guest director for a new production of "Little Shop of Horrors" that the University of Tulsa's Department of Theatre and Musical Theatre will soon present at the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus.