Music

The NPR 100
5:39 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
8:12 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Singing And Sandwiches For A Tenor's Centennial

New York native Richard Tucker in the title role of Offenbach's The Tales Of Hoffmann.
Sedge LeBlang Metopolitan Opera Archives

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:21 am

Read more
Music Reviews
4:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Sam Baker's 'Say Grace' Is At Once Beautiful And Broken

Sam Baker's Say Grace is his fourth album since he started making them in 2004, at age 50.
Chrislyn Lawrence Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:31 pm

Sam Baker has a backstory that must be told. In 1986, at age 31, he was traveling by train in Peru when a bomb from the terrorist group Shining Path exploded right next to him. The little girl he'd been talking to was killed along with half a dozen others, and his own injuries required 18 operations. His mangled left hand was rebuilt; work on his ears left him with a loud ringing that never stops, though Baker says he's made his peace with it.

Read more
Music
2:15 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Bernard Crusell and Franz Schubert featured on Performance Oklahoma

Bernard Crusell
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Bernard Crusell,  a virtuoso clarinetist, a conductor, and the best known Finnish composer before Sibelius composed music rooted in the late classical era showing the influence,  in particular of Mozart. The clarinet writing as found in his Clarinet Quartet No. 1 in E-flat Major, Op 2 is not surprisingly, quite idiomatic as well as soloistic;  the Quartet emerging as a virtual concertante with strings.  Clarinetist Chad Burrow, violinist Katrin Stamatis, violist Mark Neumann and cellist Jonathan Ruck perform the work on the third evening of the Festival.

Read more
Newport Folk Festival
1:48 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Sarah Jarosz, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Sarah Jarosz performs at the 2013 Newport Folk Festival.
Meagan Beauchemin NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:47 am

Sarah Jarosz was still in high school when she signed her record deal, and she released her debut album (2009's Song Up In Her Head) shortly thereafter, but the versatile bluegrass star seemed to emerge fully formed. For one thing, the 22-year-old keeps her music sounding warmly pretty — and rooted in accessibly poppy folk — rather than focusing solely on her Grammy-nominated instrumental chops.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
8:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Slimmed-Down Gramophone Awards Honor Home Team

The album cover for Dutilleux' Correspondances and other works, which won the Contemporary prize at the 2013 Gramophone Awards.
courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon

The British classical magazine Gramophone announced today the latest round of winners of its annual awards, now in their 90th year. With an expansive roll call of noteworthy albums ranging from early music to opera, the Gramophone Award honorees represent a tantalizing range of musical achievement — but it's a smaller array than in years past.

Read more
Ecstatic Voices
11:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:16 am

On a recent Sunday afternoon, 15 members of the Renaissance Street Singers gathered under a bridge in New York's Central Park. With little fanfare, they launched into a free, two-hour concert of music by Palestrina, des Prez and other composers who lived more than 500 years ago.

Read more
A Blog Supreme
4:28 am
Sat August 24, 2013

What Albert Murray Taught Us About Jazz

Albert Murray in 1974.
Craig Herndon The Washington Post/Getty Images

An essayist, cultural theorist, novelist, educator and biographer who died on August 18 at 97, Albert Murray spent more than five decades developing his thesis that America is a culturally miscegenated nation. His contention was that blacks are part white, and vice versa: that both races, in spite of slavery and racism, have borrowed from and created each other. In all of his writing, jazz music — derived from the blues idiom of African-Americans — was the soundtrack at the center of his aesthetic conception.

Read more
Kind of Blog: An Occasional KWGS Jazz Journal
2:19 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

On the Next Edition of All This Jazz, Remembering Marian McPartland and Cedar Walton

Two jazz-piano masters passed away earlier this week; Marian McPartland (shown here) was 95, and Cedar Walton was 79. Both had remarkably lengthy and highly influential careers in the music, as players as well as composers, and we'll be hearing a few different recordings by each of these greats on the forthcoming installment of All This Jazz, on Saturday the 24th.

All This Jazz airs each and every Saturday night here on Public Radio 89.5-1, beginning at 10pm Central. We always offer a rich, wide-ranging playlist of modern jazz, both recent and classic.

Read more
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
12:45 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Kenny Barron On Piano Jazz

Kenny Barron.
John Sann Courtesy of the artist

Kenny Barron is one of the most highly regarded players of his generation. Playing professionally since he was 15, Barron has worked with some of the jazz world's best, including Ella Fitzgerald, Joe Henderson and Roy Haynes.

Read more

Pages