Modern History

What does it take to be a successful diplomat? How does one best "train" or prepare for this type of work? And how, if at all, does the art of diplomacy differ from how it was, say, twenty or thirty years ago? A recent change of leadership at the U.S. State Department --- in the wake of last year's deadly attack on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, which resulted in the death of Ambassador Chris Stevens as well as three other Americans --- has reminded us, once again, of the serious challenges now facing the U.S. Foreign Service.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Robert Caro, the widely celebrated historian and biographer whose detailed, tirelessly researched writings have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize (twice), the National Book Critics Circle Award, the National Book Award, and the Francis Parkman Prize, among other honors. Tomorrow night, Tuesday the 12th, he'll deliver a Presidential Lecture in the Allen Chapman Activity Center here on the TU campus. The lecture begins at 7:30pm and is free to the public. (The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by TU's Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair.) Mr.

On this edition of our program, we offer a fascinating discussion concerning art, religion, and history with Dr. Clare Haynes of the University of Edinburgh. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 7th, Dr. Haynes will give the 2013 Rita and William H. Bell Distinguished Lecture at 7:30pm in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus. It's free and open to the public, and it's presented by the TU Department of Philosophy and Religion. The title for this lecture is "Resisting Affinities: The Visual Arts and the Church of England Since the Reformation." As Dr.

Today on ST, we speak with the bestselling author of "Just My Type" and other works of wide-ranging, culturally- or historically-driven nonfiction, Simon Garfield. His new book, "On the Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks," is just out. It's a detailed yet accessible survey of the age-old relationship between man and map, if you will, a study of why we as human beings are (and always have been) so fixated upon mapping things. Cartography, after all, seems to be as defining a characteristic for us (as a species) as, say, language or creativity or play.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Andrew Roberts, a longtime historian and biographer whose many books include "The Storm of War," which was named among the "100 Most Notable Books of 2011" by The New York Times. Roberts will give a free-to-the-public lecture on "Why Hitler Lost" at the University of Tulsa's Lorton Performance Center on Monday the 12th (the day after Veterans Day) at 7pm. This address is presented by Office of the Provost at TU, and copies of "The Storm of War" will be on sale before and after the event. (Mr.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Catherine Whitney, who's been the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa for the past couple of years now.

On today's ST, a detailed discussion of the currency problems affecting certain European countries --- namely, Greece, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland. We welcome to our show Dr. Stanley Black of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He's a highly respected economics professor who's also taught courses at Princeton, Vanderbilt, Yale, the Institute of International Economics in Stockholm, the University of Siena in Italy, the Brookings Institution, the International Monetary Fund, and the Free University in Berlin.

In this age of instant worldwide cell-phone communication, pervasive and incessant Internet connectivity, and 24-7 airline transport, geographical borders and topographical boundaries don't really hold us back anymore. People with the appropriate financial and legal ways and means can basically go wherever their passports might lead them, and those who blog about revolution or social change in one country might well help to trigger the downfall of a government in another country. So, does the old notion or subject (or field of study, for that matter) called geography still matter today?

On this encore edition of ST, we hear from Anne-Marie O'Connor, a writer for The Washington Post (and formerly The Los Angeles Times), who tells us about her fascinating new work of nonfiction, "The Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt's Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer." This engaging story --- part history, part fairy-tale, part suspense yarn --- gives readers the biography, so to speak, of Klimt's famous rendering of Adele Bloch-Bauer, one of the most emblematic society portraits of its time; of the beautiful, seductive Viennese Jewish salon hostess who sat for

On this edition of ST, we speak with Aili McConnon, a Canadian journalist, who (along with her brother, Andres) is the co-author of an exciting work of non-fiction called "Road to Valor: A True Story of WWII Italy, the Nazis, and the Cyclist Who Inspired a Nation." This book recounts the strange-but-true, against-the-odds story of Gino Bartali, a cyclist who not only won the Tour de France twice, but who also (to this day) holds the record for the longest time-span between victories.

We're listening back, on this edition of our program, to a conversation we had in late November of last year with the widely celebrated novelist, Alan Furst. At that time, Furst was just about to appear in Tulsa to receive the Tulsa Library Trust's 2011 Peggy Helmerich Award.

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