Modern Art

On this edition of our show, we speak with Rachel Keith, the Director of Collections and Exhibitions at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about the newly-opened and totally original exhibition, "Museum Confidential," which will be on view at Philbrook through early May of next year. As noted of this show at the Philbrook website: "Visitors [to Philbrook] often ask what goes on behind-the-scenes.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about the work of Kay WalkingStick, a widely celebrated American landscape artist who once referred to herself as "a New York painter and a Cherokee woman." Now 82, and equally (and impressively) adept in both abstract and representational styles, WalkingStick is the subject of a newly opened retrospective exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Scott Stulen, the President and Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art. At a press conference earlier today, Stulen announced a number of exciting changes in store for Philbrook, which will take effect very soon.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this edition of ST, we welcome two curators from the Philbrook Museum of Art to our show. Catherine Whitney and Sarah Lees tell us about "Lusha Nelson Photographs: Celebrity, the Forgotten Man, and 1930s America," which will be on view through May 7th of this year.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded contemporary American painter and artist, Susanna Coffey, who is currently speaking/teaching at the University of Tulsa as a Ruth Mayo Memorial Distinguished Visiting Artist.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Laleh Mehran, a Denver-based multi-disciplinary artist who moved to the United States from Iran when she was a child in the 1970s. Her art work explores cultures and locations, ideas and identities, patterns and shapes -- and it seems especially focused on issues of technology, geography, and media. Her striking pieces have been shown/installed over the years -- both individually and in group shows -- in Holland, Germany, Italy, Massachusetts, Oregon, Pittsburgh, and elsewhere.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to our studios Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Philbrook is offering a fascinating new show -- on view through August 28th -- entitled "A Place in the Sun: The Southwest Paintings of Walter Ufer and E.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and previously wrote for The New York Times.

In 1963, the up-and-coming pop artist Andy Warhol took a road trip across America, from New York to Los Angeles.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

Summertime...and the living is...cultured. On this edition of ST, we welcome Rand Suffolk back to the program. As the Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, Suffolk tells us about the various events and shows comprising that museum's "All-Star Summer." These include the exhibitions "The Figure Examined" and "The Art of Ceremony" -- both of which will be on view at the main Philbrook campus through early September -- and certain exhibits now happening (or coming soon) to the Philbrook Downtown space, among them a show that Suffolk himself curated.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion about a great new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation" will on view through September 13th. Sarah Lees, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at Philbrook -- and the curator for this exhibit -- joins us.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "Red," an award-winning play about the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko that will soon be presented at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who is directing this production.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a gorgeous new show at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum" opens on Sunday (the 3rd) and runs through September 6th. Our guest is the curator for this traveling exhibition, Jean Stern, who is the founding executive director of The Irvine Museum (in Irvine, CA).

On today's ST, we are pleased to once again welcome Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a fantastic new show on view at that museum called "New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection." This show will run through May 3rd; more info can be accessed at the museum's website.

On this edition of ST, we welcome James Warhola (born 1955), an American artist and illustrator who's created more than two dozen children's picture books over the years. Warhola briefly worked at Interview magazine in New York City -- which was established and edited by Andy Warhol, his uncle -- before becoming a science fiction illustrator. As such, beginning in the early 1980s, he did the cover art for hundreds of sci-fi books, and he was later an artist and illustrator for Mad magazine.

From now through February 26th, the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (in the downtown Brady Arts District) will present "Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate," a striking and wide-ranging exhibition collecting work by sixty different artists that first went on view in Helena, Montana, in 2008.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

On this edition of our program, we are talking about the fascinating and far-reaching work of Dennis Oppenheim (1938-2011), the American conceptual artist, performance artist, earth artist, sculptor, photographer, and filmmaker. TU's School of Art will soon present a double-venued exhibition entitled "Dennis Oppenheim: Architecture/Not Architecture, Landscape/Not Landscape," which will be on view at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery (on the TU campus) as well as the Zarrow Center for Art and Education (in downtown Tulsa's Brady Arts District).

The lasting and widespread influence that choreographer Martha Graham (1894-1991) had on the world of dance has been likened to the impact that Pablo Picasso had on painting, or that Aaron Copland had on music, or that Frank Lloyd Wright had on architecture. In other words, it's an influence that clearly continues to this day; Graham is commonly seen as a visionary who all but created what we now call modern dance, and who shaped the ideas and careers of countless dancers who came after her.

On this edition of ST, we speak with artist Ken Kewley, who teaches at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and has shown his work at many galleries, museums, and schools nationwide. "Ken Kewley: Collages, Drawings, and Paintings" is a new show that will be on display at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery (in Phillips Hall on the TU campus) from today, Thursday the 4th, through the 25th of this month. Indeed, there will be an opening reception for this show today -- from 5pm to 7pm -- at the Hogue Gallery. This reception will begin with an Artist's Talk and is free to the public.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that we did in April with the novelist and essayist Ayelet Waldman (whose books include "Red Hook Road," "Love and Other Impossible Pursuits," "Daughter's Keeper," and "Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes"). Waldman spoke with us about her then-new novel, "Love and Treasure," which has been thus summarized in Booklist: "Classics scholar Jack Wiseman, in the last throes of pancreatic cancer, entrusts an enamel locket to his granddaughter, imploring her to find the rightful owner. It's the only thing he's ever asked of her.

On this edition of our show, we welcome back Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us all about a small but impressive photography show currently on view at the museum. "Hard Times, Oklahoma, 1939-40: The Documentary Photography of Russell Lee" will run through October 26th. Beginning in 1936, Lee worked alongside Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and others as part of the government-sponsored Farm Security Administration, which was a New Deal program created by FDR.

On this installment of ST, we preview a new exhibition that will soon open at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary -- Paintings and Works on Paper" will be on view at Gilcrease from August 24th through November 30th. Mainly known for his "Dust Bowl" or "Erosion Series" of Depression-era paintings, Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994) was one of the more celebrated artists to come to prominence during the Regionalist movement in American art (which also saw the rise of such masters as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood).

On this edition of ST, we're discussing a special exhibit that's set to open at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa over the weekend. Indeed, it's Philbrook's first-ever exhibition of works by Claude Monet (1840-1926), the widely admired and highly influential Fresh Impressionist. "Monet and the Seine: Impressions of a River" opens on Sunday the 29th and runs through September 21, 2014.

"Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec --- Album" is a richly varied and lovely-to-look-at exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa through May 11th. As we read of this show at the Philbrook website: "Design is a complex process in which numerous problems must be solved. Yet even in the age of computers, drawing remains an indispensable tool for many designers, allowing them to capture spontaneous ideas on paper and develop an individual formal language.

"The Sexuality Spectrum" is a powerful and wide-ranging art exhibit now on view at the The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in Tulsa, at 2021 East 71st Street, a facility whose mission is "to preserve and share the legacy of Jewish art, history and culture." This traveling exhibit runs through February, and it includes works across a range of media, all of them exploring sexual orientation and/or sexual identity. More than 50 international contemporary artists are featured, including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, and others.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing a soon-to-open exhibit at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa, "Buffalo Bill's Wild West Warriors: Photographs by Gertrude Käsebier," which will go on view Sunday, November 24th. Our guest is Michelle Delaney, director of the Consortium for Understanding the American Experience at the Smithsonian Institution.

Today we're pleased to share an interesting discussion with Barbara Grossman, the 2013 Ruth B. Mayo Distinguished Visiting Artist at the University of Tulsa's School of Art.

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