The Millennial Generation

On this edition of ST, an interesting, big-ideas-driven conversation with Dr. Jim Norwine, the Regents Professor Emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Dr. Norwine is the editor of a textbook called "A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift" from Springer Publishers. It's a collection of essays that's described like so at the Springer website: "An international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century....

Our guest on this edition of ST is Isabel Sawhill, a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where she holds the Cabot Family Chair. Sawhill also serves as the co-director of the Center on Children and Families, and she's the board president of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Her latest book is "Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage." Sawhill -- who appeared recently at an event here in Tulsa -- discusses this "important new book" (per Nicholas Kristoff of The New York Times) with us today.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

The Internet is changing life itself, and it's doing so rather quickly, and we all know this. But how is it changing...us? We speak with Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and the Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford.

The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

What do an anesthesiologist, an air-traffic controller, a translator at the United Nations, and a musical technician for Radiohead have in common? On this edition of StudioTulsa, Rich speaks with author David Zweig, who has studied this very group of highly competent professionals --- individuals who specialize in meticulous work outside of the public's view, where mistakes could be catastrophic, and where efforts almost always tend to be unrecognized.

Our guest is John Zogby, founder of the famed Zogby Poll and veteran political/cultural analyst, who did a pair of events here in Tulsa earlier this week and stopped by our studios while he was in town.