Military History

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

(Note: This interview originally aired in March of this year.) Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

On this installment of ST, on the eve of the Fourth of July, we replay an interview from last year with the Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with political analyst Dean Cheng, who works at The Heritage Foundation as a senior research fellow on Chinese political and security affairs. A widely respected political writer and commentator, Cheng has appeared on National Public Radio, CNN International, BBC World Service, and elsewhere, and he recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Middlekauff -- whose earlier books include "The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596–1728," which won the Bancroft Prize, and "The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize -- joins us to talk about his latest book, "Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader" (Knopf).

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

Where do things now stand regarding the Russia-Ukraine conflict? And how did we get here, and what might the future have in store? Such are the questions we're exploring today. On this edition of ST, we speak with William B. Taylor, Jr., the acting executive vice president at the United States Institute of Peace. From 2011 to 2013, Taylor was the Special Coordinator for Middle East Transitions in the U.S.

On this installment of ST, an interesting conversation with Anne Sarah Rubin, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who is also the author of "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory." This book explores the stories as well as the myths about Sherman's infamous March to the Sea.

Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Brian Katulis, a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia. Katulis -- who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, and who spoke with us while he was in town -- has served as a consultant to numerous U.S. government agencies, private corporations, and non-governmental organizations on projects in more than two dozen countries, including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Egypt, and Colombia.

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