Mental Health

On this episode of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with reporter April Dembosky, who covers health care issues and medical news for public-radio station KQED in San Francisco (and also for NPR, on occasion). Dembosky recently participated in a segment on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered that carried the headline "Calif.

(Note: This program originally aired in July.) On this edition of our show, we offer a how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Representative Patrick J. Kennedy, who served several years in the U.S. House of Representatives as a congressman from Rhode Island, and who is best known as the author and lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This landmark piece of legislation provides tens of millions of Americans (who were previously denied care) with access to mental health treatment. Today, Rep.

MHAO

The recent suicide of Robin Williams has people asking questions about depression. In Tulsa tomorrow afternoon, a seminar, free and open to the public, will teach people how to recognize the symptoms and what to do about it. Michael Brose is Director of Mental Health Association Oklahoma. He says it’s important that people be able to ask THE QUESTION…Are you thinking about harming yourself or killing yourself?

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

Today we listen back to fascinating discussion that first aired on ST in November. At that time, our guest was the author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," had just appeared in paperback.

Our guest is author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," was one of the most widely acclaimed works of nonfiction to be published last year. The book has just appeared in paperback; Solomon joins us today by phone.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Rick Hanson, a neuropsychologist and author whose books include "Buddha's Brain," "Just One Thing," and "Mother Nurture." Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks Dr. Suzanne Koven, who practices internal medicine Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and who also writes the "In Practice" column for The Boston Globe. Earlier this month, Dr.

There's saving. There's keeping. There's collecting. And then there's hoarding. Compulsive hoarding is a problem in our society, and has long been seen as such, but it was only officially deemed a mental disorder with its inclusion, earlier this year, in the newest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or DSM). In other words, from a clinical/medical/scientific perspective, researchers have only begun to study hoarding in a serious way over the last couple of decades. On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with Dr.

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