Memoir and Autobiography

Our guest on ST is the best-selling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Bragg, who's known for his books "All Over but the Shoutin'" and "Ava's Man." His new book, which he tells us about, is "The Best Cook in the World." In this work, Bragg sets out to preserve his heritage as well as his family history by telling the stories that framed his mother's cooking, her upbringing, her education, her child-rearing, and so forth -- from her own childhood into old age. As Bragg tell us, in the American South just like everywhere else, good food always has a good story behind it.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the remarkable Blondy Baruti, who grew up in a war-ravaged part of Africa, then came to the U.S. in order to become a professional basketballer, and actually ended up as a Hollywood movie star. And along the way, of course, he also played hoops at and attended the University of Tulsa. Baruti has a new autobiography out, which has been thus praised by Booklist: "What shines through here is Baruti's good heart, persistence, and absolute unwillingness to give up on his dreams despite repeated setbacks.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) Our guest on this installment of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who's also a prize-winning historian and a Guggenheim Fellowship recipient. She joins us to discuss her book, "Slow Medicine: The Way to Healing." This work, part candid memoir and part well-informed critique, argues for an across-the-board "slowing down" of the practice of medicine in America.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is the writer, cancer survivor, entrepreneur, and former Tulsa resident, Paige Davis, who is also the author of a new memoir: "Here We Grow: Mindfulness Through Cancer and Beyond." Davis will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming symposium known as Celebrating the Art of Healing 2018: "The Future is Now." This all-day symposium will happen Saturday, April 28th, at the Town & Country School in Tulsa (at 8906 E. 34th Street).

Our guest is Bruce D. Haynes, a professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Davis. He's the co-author of a new memoir, "Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family," which interestingly blends personal narrative, African-American social history, and the literary and academic cultures of Harlem and New York City.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Barbara Lipska, Director of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she studies mental illness and human brain development. She joins us to discuss her engaging and disturbing new memoir, "The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery." As noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A vibrant mental health expert's bout with brain cancer and the revolutionary treatments that saved her life....

It's been commonly noted that we as human beings are basically hard-wired for long walks -- and for the thinking, observation, and spiritual reflection that always comes with such walks. Henry David Thoreau, for example, believed that walking alone through the woods was in itself a remedy for most of life's problems. Another such person might be the journalist and storyteller Steve Watkins, who's our guest on ST. In his new book, "Pilgrim Strong: Rewriting My Story on the Way of St.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Denver-based artist and author Melanie Gillman, who holds an MFA in comics from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Gillman is a queer, nonbinary, and award-winning cartoonist who specializes in color-pencil work and creates narratives with LGBTQ young-adult themes and subjects. Currently living and working here in our community as a Tulsa Artist Fellow, Gillman has a new book out; it's a graphic novel called "As the Crow Flies." We discuss this book on today's show.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl. A retired librarian, bestselling author, literary critic, and former Tulsan, Nancy, now based in Seattle, is a well-known reading advocate who was named the 2011 Librarian of the Year by Library Journal.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

On this edition of ST, we speak with David Hallberg -- the first American to join the famed Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow as a principal dancer, and one whom The New Yorker once described as "the most exciting male dancer in the western world." Hallberg, now based in NYC, has a new memoir out, which he talks with us about.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded novelist and short-story writer Richard Ford, who is the recipient of the 2017 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. Ford is the author of many critically acclaimed works of ficition, including "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day," and "Let Me Be Frank with You." His newest book, just out, is a memoir about his parents, which he discusses with us at length.

(Note: This interview originally aired in May of this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a new book out. As he announces in this book, he eventually made a decision to change both his life and the world...and in both cases, for the better.

On this edition of our program, we speak with the California-based physician and writer Lucy Kalanithi. Her late husband Paul, also a physician, wrote the bestselling memoir, "When Breath Becomes Air," in the final months of his life. (He died of lung cancer before his 40th birthday.) As was noted of this short yet powerful book by The Boston Globe: "Paul Kalanithi's posthumous memoir...possesses the gravity and wisdom of an ancient Greek tragedy.... [Kalanithi] delivers his chronicle in austere, beautiful prose.

On this edition of our show, we welcome the bestselling author and former editor-in-chief of Simon and Schuster, Michael Korda.

If you grew up here in the Sooner State -- and if you are, as they say, of a certain age -- then you might well wonder where all the Texas horned lizards, or horned toads, or horny toads, have gone.... Whatever you call them, they used to be readily apparent all over these parts, or so it seemed -- but no longer. What happened? Our guest is Chad Love, a freelance writer and editor based in Woodward, Oklahoma.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the award-winning Oklahoma writer Rilla Askew back to our show. Her new book, just out, is her first-ever nonfiction volume; it's a collection of nine linked essays entitled "Most American: Notes from a Wounded Place." In this timely and reflective work, she argues that the State of Oklahoma -- whether we are talking about police violence, gun culture, race relations, secret history, religious fervor, spellbinding landscapes, or brutal weather -- is actually a "microcosm" of the United States.

(Note: This program first aired in April.) On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of an engaging book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

(Note: This program first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an equally fascinating and entertaining discussion with the one-and-only Rebecca Ungerman, the influential and diversely-talented and fan-tabulous singer/songwriter/performer who's been wowing Tulsa audiences for 20+ years. She's bringing not one but two different shows to the Tulsa PAC's SummerStage series this month: "Cats of Any Color" will be staged on the 17th and 18th, and "Oy, Gestalt!" will be presented on the 24th and 25th.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care. Pearson’s inspired collective of illuminating clinical episodes immediately sparks to life with anecdotes from her early work in a female-owned and -operated abortion clinic in her 20s.

In 1938, Dr. Sigmund Tobias (who was a toddler at the time) and his family were forced to flee from their native Berlin, Germany, to one of the poorest districts of Shanghai, China, where they lived as refugees along with 17,000 other European Jews for more than a decade. Dr. Tobias is our guest today on StudioTulsa. He will share his moving personal story as the featured speaker for the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education's 20th Annual Yom HaShoah / Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration, which happens tomorrow night (Thursday the 20th) at Congregation B’nai Emunah.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of a striking and engaging new book, "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

On this edition of ST, a rather "wild ride" of a conversation with Charles Monroe-Kane, a producer and host for the long-running Wisconsin Public Radio program To the Best of Our Knowledge (which is heard locally on Public Radio 89.5 on Sunday mornings). Monroe-Kane has a new book out -- an autobiography that candidly reports on how he grew up with auditory hallucinations and bipolar disorder. It's a detailed yet breathless account that takes the reader from rural Ohio, to the Philippines, to Haiti, to Indiana, to San Francisco, to Alaska, to NYC, to Prague, and so forth.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

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