Medicine

Our guest on today's StudioTulsa is the Oregon-based author Craig Ryan, who tells us about his new book, just out from Liveright: "Sonic Wind: The Story of John Paul Stapp and How a Renegade Doctor Became the Fastest Man on Earth." This biography offers readers, per a starred review in Kirkus, "[the] remarkable, almost-forgotten story of an aerospace pioneer....

On this edition of ST, we learn about a locally based conference on the prevention of child sexual abuse, which is happening today and tomorrow (the 8th and 9th) at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center (at 41st and Yale). "Shifting Child Sexual Abuse Paradigms" -- hosted by the nonprofit Empowering Adults-Protecting Children, Inc. -- will bring together a range of experts who work every day in this regard with children and families throughout Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Gerard Clancy back to our program. Earlier this year, Dr. Clancy was named Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of The University of Tulsa's soon-to-be-officially-opened College of Health Sciences; before joining TU, he was President of OU-Tulsa for eight years. A recognized expert on community health, psychiatry, health care policy, and the study of medicine, Dr. Clancy tells us about how this newly created college will operate.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Erik Vanderlip, who is the George Kaiser Foundation Chair in Mental Health and an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medical Informatics at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine at OU-Tulsa. Board certified in both Family Medicine and Psychiatry, Dr. Vanderlip also has a degree in public health and health services research, and he specializes in caring for medically and psychiatrically complex individuals.

What exactly is palliative care, and to what degree does it differ from hospice? And why have more and more hospitals around the nation started offering palliative care programs, especially over the past decade or so? On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we present an engaging discussion with Dr. John Hendrix, the newly named Medical Director of Palliative Care and Hospice Services at St. John Medical Center here in Tulsa. Interestingly, Dr.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr.

On this edition of ST on Health, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian is our guest. He's widely considered one of the most influential voices in American health care when it comes to social technology and its relationship with medicine, and he'll be leading a free-to-the-public workshop this afternoon (Tuesday the 14th) at the Perkins Auditorium on the OU-Tulsa campus (at 41st and Yale). The workshop is called "The Public Health Provider." As Dr.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Linda Johnston, the Director of Social Services for Tulsa County. Last month, Johnston spoke briefly with Steve Innskeep of NPR's Morning Edition about the County's Drug Recycling Program, which began in 2004.

On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

On this edition StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about a newly launched website -- both clear and striking in its design, both interactive and up-to-the-minute in its content -- called Future of You. It takes a decidedly people-focused and tech-savvy approach to health and medical issues, and it was launched back in March by the good folks at KQED (which is a public radio and TV affiliate in the San Francisco Bay Area).

(Please note: This show originally aired in January.) Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

On this installment of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr. Welch joins us to talk about his new book, "Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care." It's a volume that offers, in the words of Kirkus, "a bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions....

On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday night of next week, at 8pm each evening, PBS television (seen here in Greater Tulsa on OETA) will air a three-part, six-hour documentary, "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies." It's directed by Barak Goodman and executive produced by Ken Burns, and Goodman is our guest on this edition of ST. As the PBS website notes of this documentary, which is based on the likewise-titled, Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Dr.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak by phone with seven-time Olympic medalist and Oklahoma native Shannon Miller, who will give the keynote address at the 11th Annual Celebrating the Art of Healing Symposium here in Tulsa on Saturday, March 28th, at St. John Medical Center (near 19th and Utica). This symposium is free to the public, and it's open to cancer survivors as well as the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Michael Finkelstein, MD, the so-called "Slow Medicine Doctor," who's been featured in The New York Times, on CNN, at the Huffington Post website, and so forth, and whose recently issued paperback is "Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness." As Dr.

On this episode of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with reporter April Dembosky, who covers health care issues and medical news for public-radio station KQED in San Francisco (and also for NPR, on occasion). Dembosky recently participated in a segment on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered that carried the headline "Calif.

Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with reporter Laura Ungar of USA TODAY, who's the co-author of an excellent and far-reaching series of articles -- entitled "Rural Hospitals in Critical Condition," and decidedly multi-media in both its execution and presentation -- that have appeared recently in the online and print versions of that newspaper.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Dr. Donald Berwick, President Emeritus and Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. A pediatrician by background, Dr. Berwick is also a former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and he has served on the faculties of the Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, as well as the staffs of Boston's Children's Hospital Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Brigham and Women's Hospital.

This evening -- Monday the 1st, at 6:30pm -- Oklahomans for Equality and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center will host a presentation by Dr. Perry Halkitis in acknowledgement of World AIDS Day. Dr. Halkitis is Professor of Applied Psychology, Global Public Health, and Population Health and Medicine at New York University; his talk happens at the Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 621 East 4th Street. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Reach Out and Read, a long-running nationwide program that, per the "mission" page of its website, "prepares America's youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together.... The program serves more than 4 million children and their families across the nation, with a special emphasis on serving those in low-income communities.

Tomorrow afternoon and evening -- on Tuesday the 18th, at the Tulsa Garden Center, from 1pm till 9:15pm -- the Tulsa Audubon Society, in collaboration with WING IT (as in "Wildlife In Need Group -- In Tulsa") and Wild Birds Unlimited, will present the second annual Wild at Art festival.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Karen M. Masterson, a journalist turned malaria researcher, whose new book is "The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure." It's a remarkable and sometimes unsettling story of science, medicine, and war -- at once illuminating and surprising, the book also explores the ethical perils of seeking treatments for disease while ignoring the human condition.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Representative Patrick J. Kennedy, who served several years in the U.S. House of Representatives as a congressman from Rhode Island, and who is best known as the author and lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This landmark piece of legislation provides tens of millions of Americans (who were previously denied care) with access to mental health treatment. Today, Rep.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks by phone with Dr. David Schiedermayer, a reflective and soft-spoken physician/author who is based in Wisconsin, tells a good yarn, and has worked in the fields of medicine and health for many years now. He's been an internist and a hospitalist in the past, and he's now focused on palliative care. Oh, and he's also one heck of a harmonica player. In fact, Dr.

Dr. David Casarett is a physician, researcher, and tenured associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He's a long-practicing and widely published palliative care expert -- and also the author of an entertaining and well-written new general-audience book, "Shocked: Adventures in Bringing Back the Recently Dead." As a critic for The New York Times has recently noted, this book is "a comprehensive review of the fascinating science of resuscitation.... A specialist in end-of-life care at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr.

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