Medicine

(Please note: This show originally aired in January.) Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

On this installment of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr. Welch joins us to talk about his new book, "Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care." It's a volume that offers, in the words of Kirkus, "a bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions....

On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday night of next week, at 8pm each evening, PBS television (seen here in Greater Tulsa on OETA) will air a three-part, six-hour documentary, "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies." It's directed by Barak Goodman and executive produced by Ken Burns, and Goodman is our guest on this edition of ST. As the PBS website notes of this documentary, which is based on the likewise-titled, Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Dr.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak by phone with seven-time Olympic medalist and Oklahoma native Shannon Miller, who will give the keynote address at the 11th Annual Celebrating the Art of Healing Symposium here in Tulsa on Saturday, March 28th, at St. John Medical Center (near 19th and Utica). This symposium is free to the public, and it's open to cancer survivors as well as the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Michael Finkelstein, MD, the so-called "Slow Medicine Doctor," who's been featured in The New York Times, on CNN, at the Huffington Post website, and so forth, and whose recently issued paperback is "Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness." As Dr.

On this episode of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with reporter April Dembosky, who covers health care issues and medical news for public-radio station KQED in San Francisco (and also for NPR, on occasion). Dembosky recently participated in a segment on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered that carried the headline "Calif.

Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with reporter Laura Ungar of USA TODAY, who's the co-author of an excellent and far-reaching series of articles -- entitled "Rural Hospitals in Critical Condition," and decidedly multi-media in both its execution and presentation -- that have appeared recently in the online and print versions of that newspaper.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Dr. Donald Berwick, President Emeritus and Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. A pediatrician by background, Dr. Berwick is also a former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and he has served on the faculties of the Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, as well as the staffs of Boston's Children's Hospital Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Brigham and Women's Hospital.

This evening -- Monday the 1st, at 6:30pm -- Oklahomans for Equality and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center will host a presentation by Dr. Perry Halkitis in acknowledgement of World AIDS Day. Dr. Halkitis is Professor of Applied Psychology, Global Public Health, and Population Health and Medicine at New York University; his talk happens at the Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 621 East 4th Street. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Reach Out and Read, a long-running nationwide program that, per the "mission" page of its website, "prepares America's youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together.... The program serves more than 4 million children and their families across the nation, with a special emphasis on serving those in low-income communities.

Tomorrow afternoon and evening -- on Tuesday the 18th, at the Tulsa Garden Center, from 1pm till 9:15pm -- the Tulsa Audubon Society, in collaboration with WING IT (as in "Wildlife In Need Group -- In Tulsa") and Wild Birds Unlimited, will present the second annual Wild at Art festival.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Karen M. Masterson, a journalist turned malaria researcher, whose new book is "The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure." It's a remarkable and sometimes unsettling story of science, medicine, and war -- at once illuminating and surprising, the book also explores the ethical perils of seeking treatments for disease while ignoring the human condition.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Representative Patrick J. Kennedy, who served several years in the U.S. House of Representatives as a congressman from Rhode Island, and who is best known as the author and lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This landmark piece of legislation provides tens of millions of Americans (who were previously denied care) with access to mental health treatment. Today, Rep.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks by phone with Dr. David Schiedermayer, a reflective and soft-spoken physician/author who is based in Wisconsin, tells a good yarn, and has worked in the fields of medicine and health for many years now. He's been an internist and a hospitalist in the past, and he's now focused on palliative care. Oh, and he's also one heck of a harmonica player. In fact, Dr.

Dr. David Casarett is a physician, researcher, and tenured associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He's a long-practicing and widely published palliative care expert -- and also the author of an entertaining and well-written new general-audience book, "Shocked: Adventures in Bringing Back the Recently Dead." As a critic for The New York Times has recently noted, this book is "a comprehensive review of the fascinating science of resuscitation.... A specialist in end-of-life care at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr.

We at StudioTulsa have been enjoying some much-cherished vacation time these past two weeks -- and hopefully you, dear listeners, have likewise enjoyed our Encore Presentations of ST for the weeks of August 4th and August 11th. If you'd like to listen to any of these past programs, you'll find audio-stream buttons for them at the following links.

Buying local and frequenting farmers' markets continue to be very popular pursuits, and for obvious reasons. But what's the best strategy for navigating the produce section of your average supermarket? Our guest on ST is Jo Robinson, an investigative journalist who lives (and often "grows her own") on Vashon Island, Washington, and who specializes in science and health.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Lauren Silverman, the Health, Science, and Technology reporter at KERA, which is the NPR member-station in Dallas. Silverman is one of the creators of a newly posted, impressively researched, and decidedly multi-media "digital storytelling project" at the KERA website that focuses on hip fractures among the elderly, in both the Greater Dallas region and the United States more generally.

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about Narcan, a/k/a Naloxone, which is a well-known and widely used opioid antagonist --- meaning, it's a drug that works to quickly block the effects of heroin, morphine, and similar opiates/sedatives. Narcan is thus administered in many instances where a person is experiencing (or has just recently experienced) a drug overdose; in this way, Narcan, which was originally developed in the 1960s, is thought to have saved some 50,000 lives nationally.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Tracy Davenport, a self-described "health care coordinator" --- basically, this means she's a freelance case manager who works to help patients and/or their families navigate today's ever-more-complicated medical system. It's often about being a good listener and asking lots of questions, says Davenport, who's had many years of experience as a registered nurse.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

From Sherwin Nuland and Abraham Verghese to William Carlos Williams and Robert Coles --- from Siddhartha Mukherjee to Atul Gawande --- there's a long and noble tradition in American writing of gifted authors and journalists who also work professionally as physicians. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we hear from such a writer, Dr. John Elefteriades, who's the Glenn Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Director of the Aortic Institute at Yale University and Yale-New Haven Hospital. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we hear from two doctors who are both highly accomplished and longtime advocates of public health, which has been defined as (per Wikipedia) "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations public and private, communities, and individuals." The health of a given culture or society, in other words, rather than any one individual's health or well-being.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the TU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will mark its 25th anniversary with a symposium here on campus regarding the moral and ethical issues involved in human medical research. The event is entitled "Protecting Human Subjects from Harm: Traversing the Moral & Legal Boundaries of Biomedical Research" and is described in detail at this link. Our guest on ST is the scholar who'll give the keynote address at this event: Dr.

(Please note: This show originally aired in September of last year.) As we grow older, of course, our bodies become less capable --- and less reliable --- when it comes to doing all the things we used to do. But as our guest reports on ST today, one of the very exciting findings in recent medical research is that the human brain can actually grow (and get stronger) over time --- and a bigger brain means better memory, increased creativity, sharper concentration skills, and a more rapid speed of learning. Our guest is Dr.

On our program today, an interesting discussion with Carl Elliott, a physician, author, philosopher, and professor at the Center for Bioethics at the University of Minnesota.

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