Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Eric Schlosser, the well-regarded American journalist and filmmaker whose bestselling books include "Fast Food Nation" (2001), "Reefer Madness" (2003), "Chew on This" (2006), and "Command and Control" (2013). This last-named title reveals the details of America's ongoing efforts to prevent nuclear weapons from being stolen, sabotaged, or detonated by accident.

Louis Lamone, Photographer; Bill Scovill and Norman Rockwell, ca 1962; Inkjet print, Norman Rockwell Collection, ©1962 Norman Rockwell Family Agency.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a new exhibition at Gilcrease Museum; "Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera" is the first exhibition to explore in depth the famous illustrator's richly detailed study photographs, which he used, quite carefully, as reference points for his iconic paintings.

On this edition of our program, we chat with Eilis O'Neal, the editor-in-chief of TU's long-running literary publication, Nimrod International Journal. Nimrod will soon host its 2017 Write Night (tomorrow night, the 20th) at the Tulsa Garden Center, which will be followed (on the 21st) by the day-long Conference for Readers and Writers at the Allen Chapman Student Union. As we learn from Ms.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we're discussing the cover story of the September 2017 issue of Consumer Reports: "Too Many Meds? America's Love Affair With Prescription Medication." Our guest is Lisa Gill, the deputy editor of Consumer Reports' ongoing prescription drug program, Best Buy Drugs. (For those not familiar: Consumer Reports is a non-profit, advertising-free, 80-year-old magazine...and now, website.) Just how hooked on meds are we Americans these days?

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that we first aired in January with John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa. At that time, Coward joined us to discuss his then-new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press." This book is a social, cultural, and pictorial history of how Native Americans were illustrated in the many and various magazines and newspapers that popped up all over the nation in the latter half of the 19th century.