Journalism

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

Turkey has been a vital U.S. ally for many years, but is that going to change in the Age of Trump? And for that matter, what do -- or don't -- Presidents Trump and Erdogan have in common? On this edition of ST, we speak with Mahir Zeynalov, a noted Turkish journalist, media analyst, and press-freedom advocate. Zeynalov is now based in Washington, DC, as he was deported from his homeland in 2014 by the Turkish Interior Ministry; he is well-known for his writing, which appears in Al Arabiya, The Huffington Post, and other publications.

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we look back on the best and worst medical journalism of 2016 with Gary Schwitzer, the founder and publisher of the website HealthNewsReview.org. This website offers a daily appraisal of health-related reporting by major U.S. news outlets and organizations. Schwitzer has worked in various forms of health care journalism/communication for the past 40+ years; he knows this aspect of the medical world like no one else.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) On this installment of ST, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Ian Scheffler, who has written for The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. His first book, just out, is a nonfiction text called "Cracking the Cube: Going Slow to Go Fast and Other Unexpected Turns in the World of Competitive Rubik's Cube Solving." As one Erno Rubik -- the inventor of the famous cube -- has noted of this book: "Scheffler provides the first comprehensive book on the global phenomenon of speedcubing.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum, who is a national correspondent for The New England Journal of Medicine. She joins us to talk about a three-part series of articles that she recently wrote for the Journal's Medicine & Society section; all three of these well-written, expertly researched pieces concern how we as a society -- and as medical professionals -- care for the mentally ill in the twenty-first century. The articles are entitled "Liberty vs.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Bret Stetka, a health, science, and medical writer who works as an Editorial Director for Medscape by WebMD, and who is also a contributor to both Scientific American and Shots (the NPR Health blog). Stetka talks about how and why he decided, after completing his med-school training, to pursue medical journalism rather than, say, some sort of doctoring or medical research.

"Into the Sun: A Novel"

Oct 24, 2016

Our guest on this edition of ST is Deni Ellis Béchard, whose previous books includethe novel "Vandal Love" and the memoir "Cures for Hunger." He joins us to discuss his new book, a novel called "Into the Sun." This book explores, as a critic for Kirkus Reviews noted, "how living in Afghanistan profoundly affected a group of friends.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we talk with Alan Schwarz, a Pulitzer Prize-nominated investigative reporter who (until recently) was on the staff at The New York Times. He joins us to discuss his groundbreaking new book, "ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic." It's a detailed report on why the widespread misdiagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has become a sad yet undeniable fact of American life.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a 2008 discussion with author and journalist Steve Lopez about his bestselling nonfiction account, "The Soloist: A Lost Dream, an Unlikely Friendship, and the Redemptive Power of Music." At that time, this book -- which explores themes of mental illness, homelessness, artistic inspiration, and creativity -- had just come out; it was later the basis for major motion picture of the same title.

(Note: This interview first aired in May.) Our guest on StudioTulsa is author Andrew Solomon, winner of the National Book Award and National Books Critics' Circle Award, whose past books include "Far From the Tree" and "The Noonday Demon." He speaks with us about latest volume, a collection of essays entitled "Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, Seven Continents, Twenty-Five Years." It's a book that chronicles Solomon's stint in Moscow in 1991, when he joined artists in resisting the coup whose failure ended the Soviet Union; his 2002 account of the rebirth of culture in Afgha

On this edition of ST, a compelling discussion with Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation whose writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone (and who is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR). We are discussing Berman's widely acclaimed book, "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," which first appeared last summer and will be published in paperback early next month.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this edition of ST, we speak with A.O. Scott, chief film critic at The New York Times. Scott has a new book out; it's called "Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This stunning treatise on criticism from...Scott is a complete success, comprehensively demonstrating the value of his art.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Rana Foroohar, who is CNN's Global Economic Analyst and an Assistant Managing Editor at Time Magazine. She joins us by phone to talk about her new book, "Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business." As David Sax of Bloomberg Businessweek has noted of this widely acclaimed volume: "Three years ago, your can of Coke suddenly cost a few pennies more. The culprits? The clever bankers at Goldman Sachs.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Wayne Greene, the editorial pages editor at the Tulsa World. As noted at the World's website, Greene is a "fourth-generation Oklahoman in his third decade with the [newspaper]. As a reporter he covered several bank failures, one prison riot, three executions, and every aspect of state government during four years at the World's state capitol bureau. He became the World's city editor on April 1, 1995, and served in that post for nearly 13 years.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is author Andrew Solomon, winner of the National Book Award and National Books Critics' Circle Award, whose past books include "Far From the Tree" and "The Noonday Demon." He speaks with us about latest volume, a collection of essays entitled "Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, Seven Continents, Twenty-Five Years." It's a book that chronicles Solomon's stint in Moscow in 1991, when he joined artists in resisting the coup whose failure ended the Soviet Union; his 2002 account of the rebirth of culture in Afghanistan following the fall of the Taliban; h

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Mark Allen Jackson of Middle Tennessee State University. He's an expert on political expression in American folk music, and he's also the author of "Prophet Singer: The Voice and Vision of Woody Guthrie" (University Press of Mississippi). Dr. Jackson will be giving a talk at the Woody Guthrie Center in downtown Tulsa this coming Saturday, the 26th, beginning at 7pm. The lecture is entitled "Woody Guthrie as Political Humorist: His Influences, Expression, and Legacy," and it's free to the public.

On this edition of ST, we offer a discussion of the life and work of Thomas Nast (1840-1902), who is commonly thought of as "the father of American political cartooning." Highly influential in his time and still admired by artists, columnists, writers, and cartoonists today, Nast might be best known for his work -- done before, during, and after the Civil War -- for Harper's Weekly. He also, quite famously, created the modern illustrated version of Santa Claus...as well as the elephant as a symbol for the G.O.P. Our guest is Dr.

file photo

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we explore the topic of unsettling medical negligence in America's immigrant-only prisons. Our guest is freelance journalist Seth Freed Wessler, whose recent cover story for The Nation in this regard is entitled "This Man Will Almost Certainly Die." As noted in the tag line for this story: "Dozens of men have died in disturbing circumstances in privatized, immigrant-only prisons. The Bureau of Prisons itself says there's a problem.

Just who are the Koch brothers -- and when, and why, did they decide to spend billions of dollars in order to change the direction of American politics? On this installment of our show, a conversation with the well-respected political reporter Jane Mayer, who is a staff writer for The New Yorker as well as the author of an acclaimed new book, "Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right." It's a book that is, per The Washington Post, "deeply researched and studded with detail....

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and previously wrote for The New York Times.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa American Film Festival, which, per its website, "showcases independent feature and short films from across the U.S., highlighting Native American films, Oklahoma-based filmmakers, local student short films, a classic Oklahoma-centric film retrospective in addition to panels and parties." The festival happens later this week, from the 15th through the 18th, with screenings at the Circle Cinema and other events at the Woody Guthrie Center and the Gilcrease Museum.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

The John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation here in Tulsa will present its 2015 Symposium on Reconciliation next week, from May 26th through the 29th, and the theme for this year's gathering is "The Media and Reconciliation." Our guest on StudioTulsa will give an address at this symposium; Isabel Wilkerson -- who won a Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, and whose bestselling nonfiction account, "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," won the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Heartlan

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lynsey Addario, an award-winning American photojournalist whose work appears regularly in The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time magazine. Having covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, the Congo, Haiti, and elsewhere, Addario is also the author of a well-regarded new autobiography, "It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War," which Publishers Weekly has called "a highly readable and thoroughly engaging memoir....

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