Jewish Religion and Culture

Tomorrow night, Thursday the 16th, the 18th Annual Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration -- or Yom HaShoah -- will be presented at Congregation B'nai Emunah in Tulsa, at 1719 South Owasso. The event is free to the public and begins at 7pm; it's co-sponsored by the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education (which is a committee of the Jewish Federation of Tulsa) and the Tulsa City-County Library.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back Karen York, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art here in Tulsa. York tells us about two interesting exhibits at the museum that will close this coming weekend; the last day to view each show is Sunday the 1st.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to a 1999 interview with Marcus Borg, a noted liberal theologian and New Testament scholar who was among the first -- from the 1980s onward -- to analyze Jesus as a historical figure. Borg, who died last week at age 72 of a lung ailment, appeared on StudioTulsa a few times over the years. This discussion marks his first appearance on our program.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Assaf Gavron, an Israeli novelist whose widely hailed fiction has been translated into several languages. Gavron's latest novel, newly available in English from Scribner's, is called "The Hilltop." Acclaimed by at least one critic as "the Great Israeli Novel" and winner of the prestigious Bernstein Prize, this ambitious, many-layered, and occasionally quite funny story explores contemporary life in a West Bank settlement.

On this edition of our program, we're pleased to speak with the distinguished orchestra conductor, scholar, and educator Leon Botstein, who has been the president of Bard College since 1975. Botstein will deliver the annual Frank Memorial Lecture in Judaism and Contemporary Issues here in Tulsa on Sunday the 7th at 7:30pm.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) There's an old Lenny Bruce one-liner that goes like this: "Everyday, people are straying away from the church and going back to God." In this day and age, there must be some truth to that idea; while it's true that more and more people in this country are giving up on the religion they grew up with or else rejecting organized religion entirely, it's also true that many who have turned away from religious institutions --- as well as many others who've lived wholly without religion --- really do hunger for something more than what con

The locally based Council for Holocaust Education will present its 17th Annual Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration --- or Yom Hashoah Commemoration --- tomorrow night (Thursday the 1st) at 7pm here in Tulsa. This event will happen at Temple Israel, at 2004 E. 22nd Place, and the featured speaker will be Dr.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a 2010 interview that we did with Krista Tippett, the Oklahoma-born and Peabody Award-winning host of American Public Media's "On Being," which is heard every Sunday at noon here on Public Radio 89.5. Tippett will be the inaugural speaker tonight (Monday the 7th) in the Harold E. Hill Lecture Series at the University of Tulsa, which begins at 7pm in the Great Hall of the Allen Chapman Activity Center.

"The Sexuality Spectrum" is a powerful and wide-ranging art exhibit now on view at the The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in Tulsa, at 2021 East 71st Street, a facility whose mission is "to preserve and share the legacy of Jewish art, history and culture." This traveling exhibit runs through February, and it includes works across a range of media, all of them exploring sexual orientation and/or sexual identity. More than 50 international contemporary artists are featured, including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, and others.

November 9th of this year marked the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht --- the "Crystal Night" or "Night of Broken Glass" --- which was a series of sudden, violent, and coordinated attacks against Jews throughout Nazi Germany and parts of Austria. Beginning on that date in 1938, the SA (a Nazi paramilitary group also known as the "stormtroopers" or "brownshirts") carried out such attacks while German authorities either looked the other way or looked on but did nothing.