Jazz

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with writer James Kaplan, whose essays and reviews have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire, and elsewhere. The first volume of Kaplan's definitive biography of Frank Sinatra, "Frank: The Voice," appeared in 2010. Now comes the second half of that life, the widely acclaimed "Sinatra: The Chairman," which the author discusses with us today. As per Publishers Weekly: "The great singer-actor contains multitudes in this vast, engrossing biography of Frank Sinatra's mature years....

Jiro Schneider / Frank Salomon Agency

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will perform this coming Monday evening (the 9th) in a concert featuring Spanish Renaissance music, Manuel De Falla's "El Amor Brujo," and a range of eclectic works ranging from English composer John Dowland to Chet Atkins and Dweezil Zappa. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with one of this Grammy Award-winning ensemble's members, former Tulsan Matthew Greif.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing a marvelous photography exhibit that goes on display tomorrow at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb" will run from July 25th through October 11th. Our guest is Dr. Frank Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Maine, who's also the curator of this show.

On this penultimate day of Black History Month, we're talking about the life and work of one of our greatest African American writers, Langston Hughes (1902-1967), the prolific and influential poet, activist, novelist, memoirist, playwright, and newspaper columnist. Our guest on ST is David Roessel, one of the editors of the recently published "Selected Letters of Langston Hughes" (Knopf).

On this edition of ST, we welcome Jeffrey Zeigler, the gifted cello player and composer who's best known for his eight-year tenure with the internationally known Kronos Quartet. Since leaving that collective about two years ago, Zeigler has embarked on an interesting (and decidedly multi-genre) solo career that's found him collaborating with a host of fascinating musicians -- such as singer/songwriter Norah Jones, avant-jazz guru John Zorn, pianist Vijay Iyer, composer Philip Glass, Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche, and so forth.

The Signature Symphony at Tulsa Community College continues its search for a new artistic director and conductor, and the field has narrowed to three young finalists, each of whom is a promising talent amid the next generation of American conductors. As the Symphony begins its new season of concerts, each of these finalists will be given the chance to wave the baton, as it were, during an actual concert.

On this edition of ST, we're pleased to speak by phone with the terrific jazz singer Rebecca Kilgore, who'll be performing here in Tulsa tomorrow night (Saturday the 29th) in the Emerson Hall at All Souls Unitarian Church. The concert starts at 7pm; tickets (for $20 each) will be sold at the door.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the pianist, composer, and bandleader Amina Figarova, who was born in Azerbaijan in 1966 and is now based in New York City. She began to study music as a child, eventually attending the Baku Conservatory, and became a classical concert pianist while still a young girl. Later she was drawn to jazz at the Rotterdam Conservatory --- and later still at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston.

KKCR

On this edition of StudioTulsa, Rich Fisher speaks with local saxophonist and composer Denny Morouse. The Pittsburgh native was a fixture in New York City music circles from the 1970s through the 1990s, working with pop superstars like Stevie Wonder, with various studio/commercial outfits, and with jazz legends like the drummer Art Blakey and the organist Larry Young. Morouse moved to Tulsa a few years ago, during the terminal illness of a close family member, and he's been based here since.

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