The Immigrant Experience (in America)

(Note: This program originally aired in April.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a broadcast from late February. At that time, our guest was psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker.

Lots of talk these days, as we all know, about "building that wall." But what about the borderwall that already exists between much of the U.S. and Mexico? And what about the cultures, events, art works, communities, and lives that are associated with this borderwall -- that is, with the various walls and fences running between these two countries? Our guest is Ronald Rael, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Architecture and Art Practice at the University of California, Berkeley.

This edition of ST features a discussion with José Torres-Tama, the New Orleans-based performance artist who will soon present his Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras project at Living Arts of Tulsa. This production will be staged on Thursday and Friday, the 18th and 19th, with both shows starting at 8pm. Also on our program is the local poet Amairani Perez, who will be one of the Tulsa-based artists participating in this project.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

How have civil rights changed in this country -- and indeed, around the world -- since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001? How has our understanding of civil rights -- our common impression of it -- changed in this regard, as well as our politics? We explore such questions with our guest on ST today, Sahar F. Aziz, who is a professor at the Texas A&M University School of Law and a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. She'll deliver the 17th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture at the TU Law School on Thursday the 15th at 6pm.

On this edition of ST, we offer a discussion of the life and work of Thomas Nast (1840-1902), who is commonly thought of as "the father of American political cartooning." Highly influential in his time and still admired by artists, columnists, writers, and cartoonists today, Nast might be best known for his work -- done before, during, and after the Civil War -- for Harper's Weekly. He also, quite famously, created the modern illustrated version of Santa Claus...as well as the elephant as a symbol for the G.O.P. Our guest is Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is Erika Lee, who teaches history at the University of Minnesota, where she's also the Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center. Lee tells us about her widely acclaimed book, "The Making of Asian America: A History" (Simon & Schuster). As was noted of this volume in the pages of The New York Times Book Review: "Sweeping....

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On this edition of StudioTulsa, we explore the topic of unsettling medical negligence in America's immigrant-only prisons. Our guest is freelance journalist Seth Freed Wessler, whose recent cover story for The Nation in this regard is entitled "This Man Will Almost Certainly Die." As noted in the tag line for this story: "Dozens of men have died in disturbing circumstances in privatized, immigrant-only prisons. The Bureau of Prisons itself says there's a problem.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the two Michigan State University professors who will be jointly delivering the Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture in History tonight (Monday the 15th) on the TU campus. The lecture is free to the public; it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall. Our guests are Lewis H. Siegelbaum and Leslie Page Moch, who are also the co-authors of "Broad Is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia's Twentieth Century" (Cornell University Press).

From the most powerful politicians in Washington, DC, to the director of "Birdman," Alejandro González Iñárritu, who accepted the Best Picture Oscar at last night's Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood, immigration reform -- and finally doing something about immigration reform -- is on the minds of many. On this edition of ST, we talk about such with Tamar Jacoby, the president and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA, which is a national federation of small business owners working to advance better immigration law.

When the TCCL's Martin Regional Library opened its Hispanic Resource Center in 1999, the noted author and journalist Roberto Suro was the inaugural speaker. Now, as this facility marks its Quinceañera (or 15th Anniversary), Suro returns to the Hispanic Resource Center to talk about his latest book, "Writing Immigration: Scholars and Journalists in Dialogue," and to discuss changes in the U.S. Latino community over the past decade and a half. Suro's address is free to the public, and it happens tonight (Thursday the 2nd) at 7pm at the Martin Regional Library (2601 S. Garnett Road).

Today on our program, an interesting chat with Anand Giridharadas, a columnist for The New York Times who's also the author of "India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking" (which the Financial Times called "a finely observed portrait of the modern nation"). Giridharadas joins us to talk about his new book, which is just out.