Health Care

On this installment of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr. Welch joins us to talk about his new book, "Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care." It's a volume that offers, in the words of Kirkus, "a bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions....

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak by phone with seven-time Olympic medalist and Oklahoma native Shannon Miller, who will give the keynote address at the 11th Annual Celebrating the Art of Healing Symposium here in Tulsa on Saturday, March 28th, at St. John Medical Center (near 19th and Utica). This symposium is free to the public, and it's open to cancer survivors as well as the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them.

As our state's newly inaugurated legislative session continues, there's been no shortage of bills that've attracted attention from the national media -- for less than favorable reasons -- including bills that would ban "hoodies" or AP History classes, or those that would allow Oklahoma businesses to discriminate against their gay customers or else end civil marriages altogether. What we have not seen -- not yet, anyway -- is a responsible discussion of how to fill a $611 million shortfall in next year's budget.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Michael Finkelstein, MD, the so-called "Slow Medicine Doctor," who's been featured in The New York Times, on CNN, at the Huffington Post website, and so forth, and whose recently issued paperback is "Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness." As Dr.

On this episode of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with reporter April Dembosky, who covers health care issues and medical news for public-radio station KQED in San Francisco (and also for NPR, on occasion). Dembosky recently participated in a segment on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered that carried the headline "Calif.

Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

At the end of 2014, a surprising announcement appeared in the Tulsa World. A subsequent news item expanding on this announcement had the following headline: "Morton Clinics Won't Accept New Uninsured Patients, Citing State Cuts to Funding." Morton Comprehensive Health Services -- with clinics in Tulsa, Nowata, and Bartlesville -- is one of Northeastern Oklahoma's leading providers of health care for uninsured patients.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with reporter Laura Ungar of USA TODAY, who's the co-author of an excellent and far-reaching series of articles -- entitled "Rural Hospitals in Critical Condition," and decidedly multi-media in both its execution and presentation -- that have appeared recently in the online and print versions of that newspaper.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

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