Health Care

As we grow older, of course, our bodies become less and less capable --- and less reliable --- when it comes to doing all the things we used to do. But as our guest reports on ST today, one of the very exciting findings in recent medical research is that the human brain can actually grow (and get stronger) over time --- and a bigger brain means better memory, increased creativity, sharper concentration skills, and a more rapid speed of learning. Our guest is Dr. Majid Fotuhi, the internationally recognized neurologist, science writer, and medical commentator.

Not only is there more and more debate --- and more policy, and more politics, and more "red tape" --- about health care these days, there's also much more journalism. On this edition of SToH, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Gary Schwitzer, who's been active in the field of health care journalism for 40 years now.

We speak today by phone with Katy Butler, an accomplished journalist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, The Best American Science Writing, The Best American Essays, and The Best Buddhist Writing.

One of the sweeping changes going on in American health care today --- apart from the whole Affordable Care Act juggernaut --- is the gradual, incremental transfer from using "paper charts and files" to employing electronic health records (or EHRs). EHRs, as is noted at the HealthIT.gov website, "can provide many benefits for providers and their patients, but the benefits depend on how they're used.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we welcome Dr. Julie Silver, an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She's also a prolific medical author and blogger, and her books include "What Helped Get Me Through: Cancer Survivors Share Wisdom and Hope" (American Cancer Society) and "After Cancer Treatment: Heal Faster, Better, Stronger" (Johns Hopkins Press). But she's not just a cancer expert, she's also a survivor --- following her acute treatment for cancer while still in her thirties, Dr.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Mike Brose, who's been the executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa since 1993. (You'll find a full bio for Brose here.) Back in '93, when Brose first arrived, the Association (as it's often called) could only house 12 people; today, it provides housing for approximately 875 individuals and families, many of whom are battling mental illness and/or overcoming homelessness.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann presents an interesting conversation with the Augusta, Georgia-based physician, Dr. Rob Lamberts, who writes a popular medical blog called "Musings of a Distractible Mind" --- and who's also an expert on (and, indeed, a practitioner of) the so-called Direct Care method of health care. As Dr. Lamberts explains on his personal website, he left his longtime group practice in September of 2012 in order to "build a new solo practice, Dr. Rob Lamberts, LLC.

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about the Tulsa Center for Behavioral Health (TCBH), a state-operated facility that functions as a part of the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Dr. John Schumann, our guest host, welcomes Leah Price, the executive director at TCBH, who tells us what this organization is, how it operates, and why it matters.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Jan Figart, an Associate Director and Senior Planner in Maternal and Child Health at the Community Service Council (or CSC) of Tulsa. As such, Figart serves CSC by overseeing the development of community collaboratives, staff support for coalitions, program development, grant writing, program evaluation, and analysis of community trends.

(Please note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on ST is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and a prize-winning historian. Dr. Sweet practiced medicine for twenty years at Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco --- and she's just published a book about this remarkable facility, and about her time there, and, indeed, about the state of health care in America today.

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