Health Care

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Dr. David Kendrick of OU-Tulsa. Dr. Kendrick is the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center's Assistant Provost for Strategic Planning, an associate professor of internal medicine and pediatrics, and a Kaiser Chair of Community Medicine at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine at OU-Tulsa. (You can read his full bio here.) Dr.

On this installment of ST, we debut an ongoing series of occasional, health-related interviews called StudioTulsa on Health. In this series, guest host Dr. John Schumann of OU-Tulsa, who's also a regular commentator for our program, will discuss matters of health care, health policy, and healthy living with people from throughout our community --- and, moreover, with individuals from throughout the wider fields of medicine and medical scholarship (whether they're active in these fields nationally or globally).

On this installment of ST, we are discussing Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin's recent decision not to join the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the former medical director of the oldest (and one of the busiest) public hospitals in America, Dr. Eric Manheimer, who worked for many years at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. While internationally known for its psychiatric and criminal units, Bellevue is a full service public hospital that delivers babies, fights cancer, and is a major trauma center for the city.

State of Oklahoma File Photo

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A longtime proponent of medicinal marijuana, state Sen. Constance Johnson acknowledges she has few advocates in the conservative Oklahoma Legislature.

But the Oklahoma City-area Democrat says she remains optimistic that attitudes toward easing Oklahoma's tough marijuana laws are shifting. She says her hopes are buoyed by the possibility of the Republican-controlled Senate approving a study on medicinal marijuana.

Ever wonder why the U.S. spends double the amount on health care that any other country in the world does --- and yet, still, we as a nation do not enjoy the best health care? On this edition of ST, a discussion of efforts to improve American health care quality --- with an emphasis on where and how such quality-seeking efforts are occurring in Oklahoma.

Local Reaction to Health Care Ruling

Jun 29, 2012

KWGS Reporter Catherine Roberts provides reaction to the supreme court ruling from two factions. One is from  medicine. The other is from law. You may be surprised by the reactions in this special report.

The crisis in primary care medicine is becoming more evident every day. Long wait times for an appointment, practices closed to new patients, and long waiting room times remind us that primary care physicians are being stretched. Despite record enrollments in American medical schools, however, fewer doctors are choosing primary care as their focus. On this edition of StudioTulsa, Boston General Internist Dr.

On today's program, we speak by phone with Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at The George Washington University. Dr. Mullan is one of the co-chairs for a conference called "Beyond Flexner 2012: Social Mission in Medical Education," which will happen next week at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa (at 100 East Second Street), from May 15th through the 17th. The conference is being presented by The W.K.

University of Oklahoma

While the U-S Supreme Court hears oral arguments over the federal health care overhaul, Tulsans are lining up for a free clinic.

The O-U medical school’s Bedlam Clinic is busy every Tuesday and Thursday. Among the regular clients are Chris and Lea Allen and their family. They are pleased with the service.

Hear Catherine Roberts special report on the Tulsa clinic as the nation focuses on the health care debate.

On today's show, we chat with Dr. John Henning Schumann, a writer, internist, and medical educator at the University of Oklahoma's School of Community Medicine here in Tulsa. Earlier this month, Dr. Schumann wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled "The Doctor Is Out: Young Talent Is Turning Away From Primary Care" (which you can view here). As Dr. Schumann notes in this piece: "It's no secret that there's a looming crisis in primary care.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma may receive a windfall of about $46 million a year in tobacco tax money if the federal health care goes into effect.

The law would ensure that most Americans have health insurance, either through Medicare, Medicaid, their employer or plans purchased with government subsidies.