Health Care

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

What if you had an app on your smartphone that could tell precisely how much a certain medical procedure was going to cost...before you even visited the doctor or called your health insurance company? Sounds like a rather great (and overdue) idea, no? Such an app is very much in development these days, right here in our community. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Matt Scovil and Nathan Gilchrist, the two co-founders of a company called Medefy.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims, as noted at its website, "to change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant." Indeed, as stated further at the Upstream USA site: "Fully half of all pregnancies in the United States are accidental.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about a non-profit called WellOK, which was formed in 2014, and which bills itself as "the Northeastern Oklahoma Business Coalition on Health." It's a coalition of 17 locally based organizations, including businesses large and small that purchase healthcare as well as government and philanthropic organizations.

On this edition of ST, an interesting exit interview with John W. Silva; the CEO of Morton Comprehensive Health Services here in Tulsa will leave this post next month to assume a similar job in his native Massachusetts. Silva has been at the helm of Morton since 2010. Under his leadership, it has expanded from its North Tulsa headquarters to additional locations in Bartlesville and west Tulsa and has moreover become Oklahoma's only community health center-based teaching facility.

On this installment of ST on Health, we listen back to fine show from the summer of 2014. At that time, guest host John Schumann spoke with Lauren Silverman, the Health, Science, and Technology Reporter at KERA, which is the NPR member-station in Dallas. Silverman -- as she tells us in detail -- helped to create an impressively researched and decidedly multimedia "digital storytelling project" at the KERA website dealing with hip fractures among the elderly, in both the Greater Dallas region and the United States more generally.

Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

On this presentation of ST on Health, an interesting chat with Theresa Brown, a clinical nurse who also writes regularly about nursing for The New York Times, CNN.com, and other national media. Brown's new memoir is "The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients' Lives," and Publishers Weekly (in a starred review) called it a "meticulous, absorbing shift-in-the-life account of one nurse's day on a cancer ward [which] stands out for its honesty, clarity, and heart.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Philip Lederer, a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Dr. Lederer also writes about medical and health-related issues frequently, and one of his primary concerns as a writer comes down, quite simply, to two words: white coats. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the popular New Yorker cartoonist and bestselling author Roz Chast about her latest book, an award-winning graphic memoir called "Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?" It's a book that is, as Michiko Kakutani noted in The New York Times, "by turns grim and absurd, deeply poignant and laugh-out-loud funny. Ms.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Gerard Clancy back to our program. Earlier this year, Dr. Clancy was named Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of The University of Tulsa's soon-to-be-officially-opened College of Health Sciences; before joining TU, he was President of OU-Tulsa for eight years. A recognized expert on community health, psychiatry, health care policy, and the study of medicine, Dr. Clancy tells us about how this newly created college will operate.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Erik Vanderlip, who is the George Kaiser Foundation Chair in Mental Health and an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medical Informatics at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine at OU-Tulsa. Board certified in both Family Medicine and Psychiatry, Dr. Vanderlip also has a degree in public health and health services research, and he specializes in caring for medically and psychiatrically complex individuals.

What exactly is palliative care, and to what degree does it differ from hospice? And why have more and more hospitals around the nation started offering palliative care programs, especially over the past decade or so? On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we present an engaging discussion with Dr. John Hendrix, the newly named Medical Director of Palliative Care and Hospice Services at St. John Medical Center here in Tulsa. Interestingly, Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr.

On this edition of ST on Health, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian is our guest. He's widely considered one of the most influential voices in American health care when it comes to social technology and its relationship with medicine, and he'll be leading a free-to-the-public workshop this afternoon (Tuesday the 14th) at the Perkins Auditorium on the OU-Tulsa campus (at 41st and Yale). The workshop is called "The Public Health Provider." As Dr.

By all accounts, the recently-ended U.S. Supreme Court term has been an historic one. With major rulings concerning same-sex marriage, health care subsidies, lethal injection, religious symbols and free speech, social media and free speech, political redistricting, religious freedom in prison, and several other areas, the high court has put forth decisions in recent days and weeks that will undoubtedly influence American life in countless ways.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Linda Johnston, the Director of Social Services for Tulsa County. Last month, Johnston spoke briefly with Steve Innskeep of NPR's Morning Edition about the County's Drug Recycling Program, which began in 2004.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with James Walker, who's been the executive director of Youth Services of Tulsa (or YST) for 14 years now. A nonprofit United Way agency dating back to 1969, YST is, per its website, "committed to fostering a community atmosphere that values youth as resources. We provide innovative services and activities designed to increase self-discovery and instill positive core values and decision-making skills that will keep youth safe and allow them to lead healthy and productive lives.

On this edition StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about a newly launched website -- both clear and striking in its design, both interactive and up-to-the-minute in its content -- called Future of You. It takes a decidedly people-focused and tech-savvy approach to health and medical issues, and it was launched back in March by the good folks at KQED (which is a public radio and TV affiliate in the San Francisco Bay Area).

(Please note: This show originally aired in January.) Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

On this installment of ST on Health, we speak with Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School and nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. His past books include the widely acclaimed "Overdiagnosed." Dr. Welch joins us to talk about his new book, "Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care." It's a volume that offers, in the words of Kirkus, "a bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions....

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak by phone with seven-time Olympic medalist and Oklahoma native Shannon Miller, who will give the keynote address at the 11th Annual Celebrating the Art of Healing Symposium here in Tulsa on Saturday, March 28th, at St. John Medical Center (near 19th and Utica). This symposium is free to the public, and it's open to cancer survivors as well as the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them.

As our state's newly inaugurated legislative session continues, there's been no shortage of bills that've attracted attention from the national media -- for less than favorable reasons -- including bills that would ban "hoodies" or AP History classes, or those that would allow Oklahoma businesses to discriminate against their gay customers or else end civil marriages altogether. What we have not seen -- not yet, anyway -- is a responsible discussion of how to fill a $611 million shortfall in next year's budget.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Michael Finkelstein, MD, the so-called "Slow Medicine Doctor," who's been featured in The New York Times, on CNN, at the Huffington Post website, and so forth, and whose recently issued paperback is "Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness." As Dr.

On this episode of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with reporter April Dembosky, who covers health care issues and medical news for public-radio station KQED in San Francisco (and also for NPR, on occasion). Dembosky recently participated in a segment on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered that carried the headline "Calif.

Our guest is Bessel van der Kolk, the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, and the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. He speaks with us about his new book, "The Body Keeps the Score," which was praised last fall by Library Journal as follows: "Renowned trauma researcher van der Kolk's book is comprehensive in scope.

At the end of 2014, a surprising announcement appeared in the Tulsa World. A subsequent news item expanding on this announcement had the following headline: "Morton Clinics Won't Accept New Uninsured Patients, Citing State Cuts to Funding." Morton Comprehensive Health Services -- with clinics in Tulsa, Nowata, and Bartlesville -- is one of Northeastern Oklahoma's leading providers of health care for uninsured patients.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with reporter Laura Ungar of USA TODAY, who's the co-author of an excellent and far-reaching series of articles -- entitled "Rural Hospitals in Critical Condition," and decidedly multi-media in both its execution and presentation -- that have appeared recently in the online and print versions of that newspaper.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

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