Health Care

(Note: This interview originally aired back in February.) On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) "The disappearing maternal care problem is common across rural America. Only about 6 percent of the nation's OB/GYNs work in rural areas, according to the latest survey numbers from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Yet 15 percent of the country's population, or 46 million people, live in rural America.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of doctors and suicide in America today. Our guest is the psychiatrist and author, Dr. Michael Myers, a Brooklyn-based expert on this subject; his latest book is "Why Physicians Die by Suicide: Lessons Learned from Their Families and Others Who Cared." As was noted of this book by Dr. Carol A. Bernstein, a past president of the American Psychiatric Association: "In tackling one of the biggest medical challenges of our time -- physician depression and suicide -- Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions." In an appreciation of this book by Publishers Weekly, we find: "Science journalist Begley demystifies compulsive behavior, exploring its history and manifestations and the many difficulties its sufferers face in finding appropriate diagnoses and treatment.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Robert Pearl, who was until recently the executive director and CEO of The Permanente Medical Group, which is responsible for the health care of 3.8 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide; Dr. Pearl was also selected by Modern Healthcare as one of the most powerful physician-leaders in the nation.

Health Care Bill Q&A

Jul 12, 2017
NPR

This week, Republicans in Congress have tried to rally votes behind a bill that proposes major changes to the way Americans get health care and how much they pay. In Oklahoma, nearly 4 million could be affected. Use this Q&A to explore how the bill would affect you.

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On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak by phone with Kim Garrett, the executive director and founder of Palomar, the nonprofit Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, which opened its doors earlier this year and has already aided thousands of people. Drawing on the resources of hundreds of professionals and volunteers, Palomar helps OKC-area victims of violence -- that is, individuals from all walsk of life and their children -- by offering protection, hope, and healing in a single location; some 14 different organizations are all based on-site at Palomar.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about (brace yourself) dirty diapers and the parents who fixate on them. Our guest is Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, which is America's largest children's hospital. He tells us about his new book, which reveals the many useful solutions that he's both utilized and developed over the course of his distinguished career in addressing the digestive health problems of children.

(Note: This program first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

This edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is a replay from early February. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for more than two decades. She told us about her book, "What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews, it shows us "why communication between doctor and patient is the most critical element of medical care....

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care. Pearson’s inspired collective of illuminating clinical episodes immediately sparks to life with anecdotes from her early work in a female-owned and -operated abortion clinic in her 20s.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're joined by Elizabeth Rosenthal, formerly of The New York Times, who tells us about her widely acclaimed new book, "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back." This volume, which grew out of the "Paying Till It Hurts" series of healthcare columns that she wrote for the Times, was thus praised in a starred in Publishers Weekly: "Rosenthal, a New York Times senior writer and former physician, provocatively analyzes the U.S.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the nonprofit Family Safety Center, which is located in the basement of the downtown Tulsa Police Station.

More and more Americans are acutely suffering from allergies these days, and we are doing so for longer periods of time -- that is, in some cases, we can suffer for months rather than weeks. And more and more of us are developing allergy problems in adulthood -- rather than childhood -- which seems like a reversal of how things used to be. Why is all this going on, and why now? And is climate change somehow involved? Our guest on ST is Dr. Richard Weber, who is an allergy/immunology specialist with National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a fascinating show from January. At that time, we spoke with author Adam Tanner about his then-new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry. In his previous book...[Tanner] took a broad look at the enterprises that gather and sell computer-generated data on consumers.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with William Paiva, who became the executive director of Oklahoma State University's Center for Health Systems Innovation (CHSI) in 2014. A health and biotech venture capitalist who was on the board of directors for the CHSI since it began in 2012, Paiva is an Oklahoma native who received a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Oklahoma and an M.B.A. from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the newly renovated Tandy Family YMCA (at 5005 S. Darlington Avenue). This impressive new facility, per the YMCA of Greater Tulsa website, "is a YMCA for the next generation. More than 110,000 square feet dedicated to the pursuit of healthy living and community-building [comprise] this state-of-the-art facility...[which was] built on the grounds of the 50-year-old Thornton Family YMCA, one of the anchors of midtown Tulsa.

Ian Waldie Getty Images

"The disappearing maternal care problem is common across rural America. Only about 6 percent of the nation's OB/GYNs work in rural areas, according to the latest survey numbers from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Yet 15 percent of the country's population, or 46 million people, live in rural America.

Alzheimer's Disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's -- and by 2050, this number could be as high as 16 million. Alzheimer's Disease kills more people annually than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined. And every 66 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer's Disease.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his new book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

We are joined on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday by Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for more than two decades. Her previous book was "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine," and she joins us to discuss her new book, which follows up on that one.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with author Adam Tanner, who is a writer in residence at Harvard University's Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Tanner joins us to discuss his new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion of trauma-informed therapy. Our guest is Dr. Sara Coffey, who works in the OU-TU School of Community Medicine's Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. We speak her about her wide-ranging efforts to treat kids for various kinds of trauma -- how she helps kids regulate their emotions, articulate their feelings, feel better overall, deal with all sorts of issues, and understand that the trauma at hand isn't their fault.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we look back on the best and worst medical journalism of 2016 with Gary Schwitzer, the founder and publisher of the website HealthNewsReview.org. This website offers a daily appraisal of health-related reporting by major U.S. news outlets and organizations. Schwitzer has worked in various forms of health care journalism/communication for the past 40+ years; he knows this aspect of the medical world like no one else.

(Note: This interview originally aired in late June.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with two representatives from the Tulsa Housing Authority (or THA): Matt Letzig is the organization's Interim CEO and Terri Cole is its VP for Assisted Housing. THA, as noted at its website, "provides publicly assisted housing comprised of traditional public housing, mixed finance sites, and Section 8. Currently, THA provides assistance to more than 20,000 individuals, or 7,200 families....

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