Global Affairs

On this edition of our show, we are talking about Latin America's two largest economies, those of Mexico and Brazil. Each has experienced much of the turbulence or strife that goes hand in hand, it seems, with globalization --- but each has also enjoyed many of the benefits of this ongoing, open-ended worldwide phenomenon. Our guest today on ST is an expert on such; Dr. Diana Negroponte is a nonresident senior fellow with the Latin America Initiative under the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution.

Tonight, Thursday the 13th, TU's Department of History will present the Annual Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here on the University of Tulsa campus; the event begins at 7:30pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium. Our guest on ST is the distinguished academic who will be delivering this free-to-the-public lecture: Professor Norman Naimark is the Robert and Florence McDonnell Chair in East European History at Stanford University. He's also a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution and the Institute of International Studies.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about the rise of China with David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University. Professor Shambaugh is a well-known authority on contemporary China and international relations within Asia, and his latest book is "China Goes Global: The Partial Power," which Foreign Affairs has called a "masterful survey." He gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations last week, and he stopped by our Public Radio Tulsa studios while he was in town.

On our show today, a discussion with Paul Kivel, who is the author of "Uprooting Racism" and the director of the Christian Hegemony Project. Kivel is also a social-justice activist and educator whose new book, just out, is "Living in the Shadow of the Cross: Understanding and Resisting the Power and Privilege of Christian Hegemony." It is, to be sure, a work that makes several debatable points, and that takes as "given" several contentious assertions --- and so Kivel defends (and elaborates on) many of these points and assertions on this edition of ST.

What motivates a person --- or a business --- to make a philanthropic gift? And are such gifts more common or less common in this country than they were, say, a generation or two ago? What sorts of philanthropic gifts are most popular these days, and why? And how have things like the internet and the global economy changed philanthropic giving? Today on StudioTulsa, we're talking about philanthropy --- and about certain financial, economic, ethical, personal, and philosophical questions related to it --- with two local experts on this topic.

On this installment of ST, we welcome the founder and executive director of JustHope, which is a Tulsa-based non-governmental organization (or NGO): Leslie Penrose.

Stanford University

On this encore edition of StudioTulsa, our guest is Dr. Hazel Rose Markus, who is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural psychology. She's also the co-author of the book, "Clash: Eight Cultural Conflicts That Make Us Who We Are," which examines the basic differences in how human beings relate to the world --- that is, the differences that define how we perceive other cultures and people unlike ourselves.  Dr. Markus is a pioneer in the study of independent and interdependent selves.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Pakistan, that vitally important yet on-again-off-again U.S. ally --- or is "ally" even the proper term here? --- which saw an electoral "first" recently. That is, after its historic elections over the weekend, Pakistan's first elected government served its full term and then ceded power to a new government, to be headed by prime minister-elect Nawaz Sharif and president-elect Asif Ali Zardari. Our guest is the noted South Asian expert, Dr.

"Eight Cultural Conflicts That Make Us Who We Are"

May 14, 2013

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Hazel Rose Markus, who is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural psychology.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Molly Williamson, a highly experienced former Foreign Service Officer who served six U.S. Presidents over the course of a long, far-flung career, eventually achieving the rank of Career Minister. Throughout the 1990's and early 2000's, she held important positions within the U.S. Departments of Energy, Commerce, State, and Defense.