Global Affairs

On this edition of ST, we learn about World Neighbors. This OKC-based NGO, per its website, "focuses on training and educating communities to find lasting solutions to the challenges they face -- hunger, poverty, and disease -- rather than giving them food, money, or constructing buildings. Children often walk miles just for access to clean water. World Neighbors works to ease the burden of water walks by educating communities how to install wells in their villages.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Robert W. Jordan, who is Diplomat in Residence and Adjunct Professor of Political Science in the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. Jordan served as U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 2001 to 2003, taking charge of his mission in the wake of the 9/11 attacks -- an especially critical time in U.S.-Saudi relations. Jordan spoke recently here in Tulsa, when he was guest of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, we speak with P.W. Singer, who is a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation; the founder of NeoLuddite, a technology advisory firm; and the author of several award-winning books. Singer is widely considered a leading expert on trends and tactics in 21st-century warfare, and he'll be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight (Tuesday the 29th) on the TU campus. The talk is entitled "Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know," and it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall.

On this edition of ST, an interesting, big-ideas-driven conversation with Dr. Jim Norwine, the Regents Professor Emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Dr. Norwine is the editor of a textbook called "A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift" from Springer Publishers. It's a collection of essays that's described like so at the Springer website: "An international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century....

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that originally aired in June of last year. At that time, we had an interesting conversation with the British author and scholar Toby Wilkinson, a widely respected scholar of Egyptology.

Where do things now stand regarding the Russia-Ukraine conflict? And how did we get here, and what might the future have in store? Such are the questions we're exploring today. On this edition of ST, we speak with William B. Taylor, Jr., the acting executive vice president at the United States Institute of Peace. From 2011 to 2013, Taylor was the Special Coordinator for Middle East Transitions in the U.S.

China -- where so much of the world's population has lived for thousands and thousands of years now, and where several of the world's most polluted cities can be found -- is now starting to transition from a mega-economy that's based on exporting to one that's based on domestic consumerism. What will this transition mean for that country's already-troubled environment? And how is it even possible -- from a soil or fertility perspective -- that parts of China have served as farmland for literally 3,000 years? On this installment of ST, we speak with Prof. Robert B.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Brian Katulis, a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia. Katulis -- who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, and who spoke with us while he was in town -- has served as a consultant to numerous U.S. government agencies, private corporations, and non-governmental organizations on projects in more than two dozen countries, including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Egypt, and Colombia.

The around-the-world journey that locally based food blogger Sasha Martin undertook was truly remarkable; over the span of nearly four years, this Tulsa-based mom and author -- who's our guest on ST today -- set out to cook, and eat, a meal from every country on the planet.