Gay Studies

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we are discussing World AIDS Day, which arrives on Friday the 1st; we're also talking more generally about how people with AIDS are cared for here in our community. We have two guests -- the first is Kate Neary, the CEO of a local nonprofit known as Tulsa Cares, and the second is Dr. Madhuri Lad, who works in the Department of Internal Medicine at the OSU-Tulsa College of Health Sciences (and who is, moreover, certified in HIV Medicine).

The Supreme Court has by now affirmed, of course, that gay marriage is the law of the land, and LGBTQ lifestyles, television shows, cultures, and communities are becoming more and more present -- and thus more and more visible -- in American life. How is this sea-change affecting America's churches, especially here in the middle of the country? On this edition of ST, we speak with Rev. Cynthia Meyer, a United Methodist minister. Earlier this year, she came out -- while she was preaching a homily -- to her Edgerton, Kansas, congregation.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about "Mothers and Sons," a play by Terrence McNally which originally opened on Broadway in 2014, and which opens tonight (Friday the 13th) at the Tulsa PAC's John H. Williams Theatre. It's a tragic yet often amusing depiction of an older woman from Dallas who pays an unexpected visit to the New York City apartment of her late son's partner, who is now married to another man.

On our show today, a conversation with Micah Fitzerman-Blue, a writer and producer now living in Los Angeles who grew up in Tulsa and attended Holland Hall School (and later, Harvard University). He's probably best known as a writer and producer for the award-winning Amazon television show, "Transparent," starring Jeffrey Tambor and Gaby Hoffmann -- and his first feature film, "The Motel Life," appeared in 2013 and starred Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, and Kris Kristopherson, winning both Best Screenplay and the Audience Award at the Rome Film Festival.

On this edition of ST, we present a fascinating discussion with Dr. Robert Spoo, the Chapman Distinguished Chair at The University of Tulsa College of Law, who has recently been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for 2016 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Anthony Wilkinson, the writer/creator of "My Big Gay Italian Wedding," a musical comedy that premiered off-Broadway in 2003...and then, eventually, after some revisions...opened on Broadway itself in 2010. This popular play is still staged in NYC, and it's also been presented -- by this point -- at venues all over the glove. It actually opened here in Tulsa last night, the 16th, in a production being offered by the Tulsa-based American Theatre Company through June 26th.

On today's StudioTulsa, we learn about a new documentary film called "Misfits," which was screened last week at a special event at the Circle Cinema. This film, which was directed by the Danish filmmaker Jannik Splidsboel, and which debuted at the Berlin International Film Festival in February, is (per its listing at the IMDB website) about "three American teenagers from conservative Tulsa [who] are struggling with isolation and instability....

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Kentucky-based writer and historian, Emily Bingham, who is the author of "Mordecai: An Early American Family" (2003) and co-editor of "The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal." Bingham tells us about her newest book, which is actually a biography of her own great-aunt: "Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Kirkus: "A colorful portrait of a daring woman....

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.

This evening -- Monday the 1st, at 6:30pm -- Oklahomans for Equality and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center will host a presentation by Dr. Perry Halkitis in acknowledgement of World AIDS Day. Dr. Halkitis is Professor of Applied Psychology, Global Public Health, and Population Health and Medicine at New York University; his talk happens at the Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 621 East 4th Street. Dr.

Our guest on ST is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Dannielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a new book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it. The book is, as she explains, meant to be an easy-to-read, go-to resource for parents hoping to understand and communicate with their gay child.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of the marriage equality movement in our country. Hard to believe, perhaps, but the right for same-sex couples to marry was granted to the people of Massachusetts only ten years ago. A lot has happened in the last decade --- and by now, given that 20 different states have approved same-sex marriage, it's obvious that a lot of Americans have changed their minds and/or embraced gay-marriage tolerance, especially younger Americans.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil, who belongs to the royal family of the former princely state of Rajpipla in the Indian subcontinent. He's the only known person of royal lineage in modern India to have publicly revealed that he is homosexual. After he suffered a nervous breakdown in 2002, Prince Manvendra's doctors told his family that he was gay, and he himself first talked publicly about his sexual orientation in 2006.

"The Sexuality Spectrum" is a powerful and wide-ranging art exhibit now on view at the The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in Tulsa, at 2021 East 71st Street, a facility whose mission is "to preserve and share the legacy of Jewish art, history and culture." This traveling exhibit runs through February, and it includes works across a range of media, all of them exploring sexual orientation and/or sexual identity. More than 50 international contemporary artists are featured, including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, and others.

We speak today by phone with author Sara Farizan, who is the daughter of Iranian immigrants, lives near Boston, and has just published her first novel. It's a YA novel that's been getting great reviews, and it's called "If You Could Be Mine." This book tells the story of two girls, Sahar and Nasrin, lifelong friends who live in the great Iranian city known as Tehran, and who also happen to be in love with one another. It is, as a critic for School Library Journal has written, a "terrific debut novel....