Gardening

On this edition of our show, we learn all about Kendall Whittier, Incorporated, or KWI, which is a neighborhood-minded and long-running nonprofit now marking its 50th Anniversary. KWI is, per its website, "a home-grown organization incorporating self-sufficiency for our neighbors through food security, nutritional health, and well-being." KWI -- the only food pantry in the Tulsa area that actually delivers to its participants' doorsteps -- will host an event tonight (Thursday the 7th) in celebartion of its Golden Anniversary.

Our guest is the noted gardening expert, Lee Reich, whose books include "Weedless Gardening" and "Landscaping with Fruit" -- and who writes a syndicated garden column for the Associated Press. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Ever Curious Gardener: Using a Little Natural Science for a Much Better Garden." The book shows how one can employ scientific know-how to help plants thrive during a drought, outwit weeds by understanding their nature and composition, make the best year-round use of compost, and so forth.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to our show Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees, which is a popular nonprofit that's been active in Tulsa since 1976. As noted at the Up With Trees website: "In the last four decades, we have planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa.

Attention, flower- and plant-lovers! On this installment of ST, we speak with local gardening expert Barry Fugatt, who is also the resident horticulturist at the Tulsa Garden Center as well as the director of the Linnaeus Teaching Garden. (Both facilities are based at Woodward Park here in Tulsa.) As Fugatt tells us today, the Linnaeus Teaching Garden -- named for Carl Linnaeus, the Swedish naturalist and so-called "father of botany" -- will celebrate its tenth anniversary tomorrow (Saturday the 4th) with a special day of open-to-the-public activities.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Todd Lasseigne back to our show. He's a nationally recognized horticulturist who is also the president & CEO of the Tulsa Botanic Garden. This weekend, the Garden will celebrate the grand opening of its new A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces -- the big "public unveiling" happens at noon on Saturday, October 3rd.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion with Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees. Started in 1976, this local nonprofit, as noted at its website, "has been faithful to its mission to beautify greater Tulsa by planting trees and creating urban forestry awareness through education.... In the last four decades, [Up With Trees has] planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa. We plant along streets and trails, in parks, schools, fire stations, neighborhoods, and many other public properties....

On this installment of our show, we welcome back Dr. Todd Lasseigne, President and CEO of the Tulsa Botanic Garden (which is the new name for the nonprofit facility formerly known as the Oklahoma Centennial Botanical Garden). Back in December, as Dr. Lasseigne tells us, his organization proudly announced a twenty-five-year master plan, which envisions developing some 60 acres of gardens at the Tulsa Botanic Garden site over the next quarter-century, with the site's remaining 110 acres to be maintained as an untouched expanse of natural beauty.

On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with Dr. Pamela Soltis, the curator of the Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Evolutionary Genetics at the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. She'll present the fourth annual Paul Buck Memorial Lecture on the TU campus tomorrow night (Wednesday the 17th) in Helmerich Hall. Her lecture --- entitled "Plant Conservation in the 21st Century" --- is free and open to the public, and it begins at 7pm. The scholarly work of Dr.

Earlier today, Mayor Dewey Bartlett asked the citizens of Tulsa and its surrounding communities to voluntarily restrict their water usage. This request was based on that fact that 207.3 million gallons of water were used by Tulsans yesterday; this amount surpassed the point at which City of Tulsa ordinance requires the mayor to ask for voluntary restrictions on outside watering. In fact, if the same rate of water usage occurs today, Tuesday the 31st, then Tulsans will be looking at mandatory water restrictions.