Food

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) It's a straightforward fact, yet it's also frequently overlooked or dismissed: the great majority of premature deaths in this country can be prevented through changes in diet and lifestyle. Now comes a bestselling book that describes these changes while also explaining how such nutritional modifications can sometimes do more for us than prescription meds, other pharmaceuticals, and surgical procedures. Our guest is Dr. Michael Greger, author of "How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease." As Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat once again with Katie Plohocky, the founder and director of Tulsa's Healthy Community Store Initiative. This initiative is an umbrella for several programs that Plohocky runs, all of them focused on healthy eating, healthy living, and healthy communities -- these programs include R&G Grocers (Tulsa's mobile grocery store), Cooking for Health (a program that brings farm-fresh food and nutrition to at-risk populations), and a farm-to-table catering operation.

When did names like Fat Tire and Sam Adams become as familiar -- in certain circles -- as the names Bud, Miller, and Coors? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the craft beer movement (or should we say craze?) in America today -- how it began, why (and where) it has caught on, and how it relates to key concepts like race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Our guest is J. Nikol Beckham of Randolph College in Virginia, where she is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies specializing in such pop-culture fixtures as television, popular music, and food.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a new exhibit at the Gilcrease Museum, "Chocolate: The Exhibition," which will be on view through January 8th. Our guest is Gary Feinman, the MacArthur Curator of Mesoamerican, Central American, and East Asian Anthropology at The Field Museum in Chicago; he's one of the curators of this interesting show, which was actually created over a decade ago.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Philip Howard, a professor of community sustainability at Michigan State University. He's also president of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and is a member of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems.

There's been a huge explosion in the popularity of barbecue and smoked foods, and our guest on this episode of StudioTulsa says you can smoke nearly anything -- from eggs and cheeses to desserts and cocktails. Steven Raichlen is the bestselling author of "The Barbecue Bible," and his latest public television series (and new companion book) moves beyond BBQ to a variety of smoking techniques. "Project Smoke: Seven Steps to Smoked Food Nirvana" offers tips on equipment and techniques, and an assortment of recipes far beyond the usual meats, poultry, and seafood.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to welcome Eileen Bradshaw, Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. The Food Bank, as it's commonly known, is the largest private hunger-relief organization in eastern Oklahoma. It's been around since 1981. As noted at this nonprofit's website: "Our vision is food security, with dignity, for all eastern Oklahomans.... With locations in Tulsa and McAlester, we provide food and other donated goods to 450 Partner Programs in 24 counties of eastern Oklahoma.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting chat with Katie Plohocky, who is one of the founders of the locally based Healthy Community Store Initiative. This organization, as noted at its tulsarealgoodfood.org website, was formed "to address the food desert problem in Tulsa, Oklahoma....

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Matthew Gavin Frank, a Michigan-based writer and creative writing teacher whose past books include "Preparing the Ghost," "Pot Farm," "Barolo (At Table)," and "Sagittarius Agitprop." He joins us to discuss his newest book, a collection of fifty essays that, all in all, offers a full-fledged culinary tour of the United States, with a "signature dish" for each state being described in fascinating and far-reaching detail.

Iron Gate, a nonprofit soup kitchen and food pantry at Trinity Episcopal Church in downtown Tulsa, began operations nearly forty years ago. It's still based at Trinity, but it's a separate facility -- make that a separate and vitally important facility -- that has drastically outgrown its workspace. Iron Gate, actually located in the crowded basement of Trinity, has an on-site dining area meant to seat 127 people, yet the facility serves food to 500 or 600 hungry Tulsans every day of the year.

The around-the-world journey that locally based food blogger Sasha Martin undertook was truly remarkable; over the span of nearly four years, this Tulsa-based mom and author -- who's our guest on ST today -- set out to cook, and eat, a meal from every country on the planet.

Our guest on ST today is the Atlanta-based chef Jennifer Hill Booker, who grew up cooking on her family's farm in Charleston, Mississippi, and eventually graduated from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris -- and along the way, incidentally, earned degrees here at TU as well as OSU Tech. Booker also now serves as a culinary expert for Williams-Sonoma and is an instructor at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Georgia.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Dudley, who's a Professor of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Prof. Dudley tells us about his interesting "drunken monkey hypothesis," which (per its Wikipedia entry) "proposes that human attraction to ethanol may have a genetic basis due to the high dependence of the primate ancestor of Homo sapiens on fruit as a food source.

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For many of us, each and every year, Holiday Time equals Wine Time --- it's a part of all the celebrating, it tends to make a good gift, and it goes nicely with all that rich food. Our guest on ST today is Melanie Wagner, a certified sommelier and wine consultant who lives and works in Chicago. She is also the author of "Hello, Wine: The Most Essential Things You Need to Know About Wine," which is newly available from Chronicle Books.

(Please note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the writer Kate Christensen, whose six novels include "The Great Man," which won the 2008 PEN/Faulkner Award. Her reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, Elle, and elsewhere --- and her popular blog can be accessed here. Her latest book is "Blue Plate Special: An Autobiography of My Appetites," an acclaimed memoir, which she discusses with us on today's ST.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) Food, glorious food --- it's more, of course, than what we eat. Food is memory, family, love, culture, and community.

Our guest is the writer Kate Christensen, whose six novels include "The Great Man," which won the 2008 PEN/Faulkner Award. Her reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, Elle, and elsewhere --- and her popular blog can be accessed here. Her latest book is "Blue Plate Special: An Autobiography of My Appetites," an acclaimed memoir, which she discusses with us on today's ST.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Jayson Lusk, who holds the Willard Sparks Endowed Chair in the Agricultural Economics Department at Oklahoma State University. Lusk has a new book out called "The Food Police: A Well-Fed Manifesto About the Politics of Your Plate." Here are a few sentences from the book's opening pages: "A catastrophe is looming. Farmers are raping the land and torturing animals. Food is riddled with deadly pesticides, hormones, and foreign DNA. Corporate farms are wallowing in government subsidies.

Food, glorious food --- it's so much more, of course, than what we eat. Food is memory, food is family, food is love, food is culture, and food is community.

Marcel Proust has his little madeleine cakes. Calvin Trillin has Arthur Bryant's BBQ in Kansas City. And Tulsa-based writer and editor Mark Brown has, well, his mother's bygone fried chicken. Food, for so many of us, is about much more than taste and sustenance, much more than flavors and rations. It's about culture, society, tradition, and practically everything else --- about the past, the seasons, our memories, our loved ones. Food is as basic to the human species as are celebrations, rituals, fingerprints, or dreams.

"It's always five o'clock somewhere," as the old saying goes. And this expression, of course, was as true in the 1770s or 1860s or 1930s as it is today --- and maybe it's all the more fitting right this instant, as we approach the holiday season. On today's show, therefore, we are discussing the histories, traditions, origins, myths, and/or recipes related to various cocktails.

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Oseland, who is the editor-in-chief of Saveur magazine --- and who is also known for his TV appearances as a judge on Bravo's "Top Chef Masters." Oseland's 2006 book, "Cradle of Flavor," a memoir with recipes about living in Southeast Asia, was an award-winning volume that drew rave reviews from critics, readers, and foodies alike.