Family Life

(Note: This interview first aired back in July.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Susan Senator, a writer, activist, and longtime advocate for people with autism.

On this edition of our show, we offer a conversation with author Hisham Matar. His first novel, "In the Country of Men," was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize and the Guardian First Novel Prize, and his latest book, his third, is a memoir entitled "The Return." This work tells the story of his father's kidnapping by Muammar Qaddafi's government -- and of the fallout endured by Matar and his family over the ensuing decades.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Tony Moore, who was formerly the chief operating officer at the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, Florida, and now serves as the director of both A Gathering Place and Guthrie Green. The former is, of course, the George Kaiser Family Foundation's $350 million initiative -- now being built along Riverside Drive near 31st Street -- that will open late next year, and the latter is the popular public-park-and-open-stage space in downtown Tulsa, just across the street from the Woody Guthrie Center.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we talk with Alan Schwarz, a Pulitzer Prize-nominated investigative reporter who (until recently) was on the staff at The New York Times. He joins us to discuss his groundbreaking new book, "ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic." It's a detailed report on why the widespread misdiagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has become a sad yet undeniable fact of American life.

What is "co-housing" -- and why has it become so popular so quickly in certain parts of the U.S.? And how is it different from assisted living, or nursing-home living, or communal living? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Melanie Fry and Jane Zemel, two Tulsans who are involved with the still-emerging movement to create a Tulsa Senior Co-Housing community.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Alton Carter, an Oklahoma Book Award-winning author whose memoir, "The Boy Who Carried Bricks," was originally published in 2015. It's a painful-to-read yet ultimately uplifting autobiography that details Carter's growing up in smalltown Oklahoma. Carter will be participating in the upcoming "Chapters" event at the TCCL's Hardesty Regional Library, on September 8th at 6:30pm; this event is a fundraiser in support of adult literacy programs, and the deadline to register for it is September 1st.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a discussion with Jennifer Noonan, a Texas-based mother of two who is the founder of thegfcflady.com, a website for autism parents.

(Note: This interview first aired in early June.) "Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, routinely exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

This world, as we know, is rapidly becoming a more and more complicated and media-saturated place -- and therefore raising children, it seems, is becoming more and more difficult to do. On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Ross W. Greene, an author, speaker, and child psychologist who was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over twenty years, and who is also the founding director of the nonprofit organization Lives in the Balance (LivesintheBalance.org). Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Susan Senator, a writer, activist, and longtime advocate for people with autism. Senator is known for her two earlier books, "Making Peace with Autism" and "The Autism Mom's Survival Guide," and she joins us today to discuss her latest volume, which is called "Autism Adulthood: Strategies and Insights for a Fulfilling Life." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "Senator hits the nail on the head once again with this work that shares her continuing journey as the parent of an adult with autism.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." That book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Amy Haimerl, a professor of journalism at Michigan State University who writes about small business and urban policy for Fortune, Reuters, The New York Times, and other outlets. She was previously the entrepreneurship editor at Crain's Detroit Business, where she covered the city's historic bankruptcy trial.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to welcome Eileen Bradshaw, Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. The Food Bank, as it's commonly known, is the largest private hunger-relief organization in eastern Oklahoma. It's been around since 1981. As noted at this nonprofit's website: "Our vision is food security, with dignity, for all eastern Oklahomans.... With locations in Tulsa and McAlester, we provide food and other donated goods to 450 Partner Programs in 24 counties of eastern Oklahoma.

"Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, tenacity, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Lawrence Aber, the Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, where he is also a University Professor. Dr. Aber is an internationally respected expert on child development, poverty, psychology, and how all of these relate to social policy.

On this inaugural edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of the "family memories" that we as human beings carry in our very genes. Guest host John Schumann speaks with Mark Wolynn, the director of The Family Constellation Institute in San Francisco, where he trains clinicians and treats people struggling with depression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive thoughts, self-injury, chronic pain, and illness.

There are six waterways in eastern Oklahoma that are considered so environmentally and economically significant they're given special consideration and protection from the state. These so-called Scenic Rivers were profiled in a special half-hour radio doc created by StateImpact reporters Joe Wertz and Logan Layden in 2014. This doc was originally aired as a four-part radio series, and we are pleased to re-broadcast it today on StudioTulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a locally-rooted socio-economic and educational project called Growing Togther. It's a nonprofit that works to bring meaningful and lasting change to two different Tulsa neighborhoods marked by concentrated areas of poverty, Eugene Field and Kendall-Whittier. Our guest is Kirk Wester, executive director of Growing Together.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about "Mothers and Sons," a play by Terrence McNally which originally opened on Broadway in 2014, and which opens tonight (Friday the 13th) at the Tulsa PAC's John H. Williams Theatre. It's a tragic yet often amusing depiction of an older woman from Dallas who pays an unexpected visit to the New York City apartment of her late son's partner, who is now married to another man.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in January.) On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims to, per its website, "change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant.... Upstream USA's mission is to change contraceptive counseling and care in health centers so that clients have easy access to the best contraceptive methods.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest on ST is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims, as noted at its website, "to change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant." Indeed, as stated further at the Upstream USA site: "Fully half of all pregnancies in the United States are accidental.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the popular New Yorker cartoonist and bestselling author Roz Chast about her latest book, an award-winning graphic memoir called "Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?" It's a book that is, as Michiko Kakutani noted in The New York Times, "by turns grim and absurd, deeply poignant and laugh-out-loud funny. Ms.

In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

Summer is now, alas, leaving the proverbial building...but barbecue doesn't have to exit along with it. On this edition of ST, we learn about the free-to-the-public Rock 'N Rib BBQ Festival, which is happening at 3rd and Denver in downtown Tulsa from today (the 17th) through Sunday (the 20th).

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about Poetic Justice, an ongoing writing project for incarcerated women at the David L. Moss Criminal Justice Center in Tulsa. This writing-workshop program began about 18 months ago and has been very popular from the outset. Our guest is Ellen Stackable, a high school English and World Studies teacher at the Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences, who directs the program and serves as one of its educators.

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

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