Family Life

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out: "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this compelling and eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion about fighting opioid addiction at the individual, societal, and legal levels. Our guest is the successful OKC-based trial lawyer, Reggie Whitten. He'll be a co-lead counsel for the State of Oklahoma in an upcoming lawsuit against four different Big Pharma firms; that trial is set to begin in May of next year. Whitten's stake in the lawsuit is also quite personal; in 2002, he lost his son, Brandon, to a car accident triggered by Brandon's addiction to prescription drugs.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Joe Johnston, who's originally from Missouri, and who's written many books over the years on various topics. He joins us to talk about his newest publication, a folksy, far-ranging, and conversational history of Southern cooking -- from sun tea and fruitcake and vegetables to "the Colonel's chicken" and BBQ and beyond.

Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self." As was noted of this book by Alexandre Rossi (the author of "A Dog at the Keyboard"): "It's refreshing to finally find a book that takes into consideration the many predispositions to behavior problems in dogs.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

Women are the fastest-growing prison population group in the United States today -- and the State of Oklahoma, tragically, puts women in prison at twice the national rate. On this edition of ST, we check in with the non-profit organization known as Still She Rises, a public defender office based here in our community that's dedicated to representing North Tulsa mothers within the criminal justice system. Still She Rises, which began operations in Tulsa about a year ago, grew out of a similar group in NYC known as The Bronx Defenders.

Our guest is Dr. Daphne de Marneffe, a noted clinical psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area who has counseled couples and individuals for decades. Her new book, "The Rough Patch," aims to help married people both locate and maintain a union that promotes compatibility between an individual person's development and the often relentless demands of a two-person relationship. As was noted by Booklist, this volume is "densely packed with de Marneffe’s extensive knowledge of human emotional development and the parent-child relationships that affect us from birth....

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The small Vermont town of Norwich (population 3,000 or so) has quite possibly produced more Olympic athletes per capita than any other location in the United States. How has this community done so? What's their secret? Our guest on ST, Karen Crouse -- a sportswriter who's been on the staff of The New York Times since 2005 -- set out to answer this question.

For every six Oklahomans, one is hungry, according to the latest data. And as the U.S. Congress looks to potentially address a $1.5 trillion projected deficit, many domestic programs face an uncertain if not bleak future -- including food-assistance and hunger-relief programs -- both here in the Sooner State and nationwide. On this edition of ST, we are discussing these matters with Effie Craven, who is the State Advocacy and Public Policy Director for both of the Oklahoma Food Banks (i.e., the Regional Food Bank in OKC as well as the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma in Tulsa).

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a detailed discussion of how being "housing insecure" can seriously and negatively affect an individual's -- or a community's -- health and well-being. Our guest is Dr. Megan Sandel of Boston Medical Center, who is also an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Denver-based artist and author Melanie Gillman, who holds an MFA in comics from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Gillman is a queer, nonbinary, and award-winning cartoonist who specializes in color-pencil work and creates narratives with LGBTQ young-adult themes and subjects. Currently living and working here in our community as a Tulsa Artist Fellow, Gillman has a new book out; it's a graphic novel called "As the Crow Flies." We discuss this book on today's show.

Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a new book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" vividly documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we are discussing World AIDS Day, which arrives on Friday the 1st; we're also talking more generally about how people with AIDS are cared for here in our community. We have two guests -- the first is Kate Neary, the CEO of a local nonprofit known as Tulsa Cares, and the second is Dr. Madhuri Lad, who works in the Department of Internal Medicine at the OSU-Tulsa College of Health Sciences (and who is, moreover, certified in HIV Medicine).

(Note: This show originally aired in August of this year.) Our guest is author Ladee Hubbard, who joins us to discuss her first novel. It's called "The Talented Ribkins." It's a creative and widely acclaimed book about race, class, politics, and America itself...and it focus on, of all things, a family of super-heroes. And per a starred review of this novel by Kirkus: "Crafty and wistful.... Hubbard weaves this narrative with prodigious skill and compelling warmth. You anticipate a movie while wondering if any movie could do this fascinating family, well, justice.

On this installment of ST, we hear about how people living and working here in Tulsa would be affected by the cancellation of DACA, which President Trump proposed earlier this year. The DACA (or "Deferred Action on Childhood Arrival") Program is an Obama-era federal statue allowing some children who entered the U.S. illegally to stay here as long as they meet certain criteria; there are now about 800,000 DACA recipients in this country. Our guests today are two young people based in Tulsa who are both DACA recipients, and who both came to the U.S. at a young age.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Susan Harris, a longtime economic-development advocate and public-education expert here in Tulsa. Harris recently retired from the Tulsa Regional Chamber, where she served as the Senior Vice-President of Education and Workforce Development. Harris is also an active caregiver; she has personally assisted a few different elderly relatives who were admitted to nursing homes in our community, and she continues to help certain family members in this way.

(Note: This interview originally aired in May of this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Deborah Copaken, a bestselling author and award-winning photographer.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with Angélique Kidjo, the internationally acclaimed Beninese singer-songwriter and activist, who routinely speaks out for human rights and female empowerment as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. Named "Africa's premier diva" by Time Magazine and "the undisputed queen of African music" by The Daily Telegraph of London, Kidjo creates infectious music that draws upon Afropop, Caribbean zouk, Congolese rumba, jazz, gospel, and Latin styles; she has collaborated in the recording studio with (to name but a few) Alicia Keys, Bono, and Philip Glass.

On this edition of ST, we chat with the New York-based author and journalist Jennifer Egan, whose newest novel, the much-praised "Manhattan Beach," is just out. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel. Realistically detailed, poetically charged, and utterly satisfying: apparently there's nothing Egan can't do." And further, per Dwight Garner in The New York Times: "Immensely satisfying....

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sophia Pappas, who formerly led the pioneering initiative to bring "universal pre-K" to the New York City Public Schools. Pappas now resides in Tulsa, as she was recently hired by the Tulsa-based George Kaiser Family Foundation, the nonprofit social-justice and civic-enhancement organization funded by local billionaire and philanthropist George Kaiser. Pappas will now be in charge of introducing and implementing the GKFF's Birth through Eight Strategy, which was ten years in the making (and planning).

On this edition of our show, an interesting chat with Ali Noorani, who's the Executive Director of the National Immigration Forum (an advocacy organization promoting the value of immigrants and immigration) as well as the author of "There Goes the Neighborhood: How Communities Overcome Prejudice and Meet the Challenge of American Immigration." Mr. Noorani will be giving a free-to-the-public, immigration-focused address tonight (the 28th) on the TU campus; his address, titled "Beyond the Headlines," begins at 7pm in Tyrrell Hall.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

Our guest on this installment of ST is author Ladee Hubbard, who joins us to discuss her first novel, which is just out. It's called "The Talented Ribkins." It's a creative and widely acclaimed book about race, class, politics, and America itself...and it focus on, of all things, a family of super-heroes. And per a starred review of this novel by Kirkus: "Crafty and wistful.... Hubbard weaves this narrative with prodigious skill and compelling warmth. You anticipate a movie while wondering if any movie could do this fascinating family, well, justice.

The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the adolescent and post-adolescent years, and all that go with them -- can be difficult, of course, for a host of reasons. Whether it's finding a job, finishing school, locating a place to live, discovering what one's goals really are, deciding on a career path, and so forth -- these can be trying experiences; relying on the aid of one's family and friends in such cases is paramount. But what if you're confronting these realities and you actually have no family? Or you have no "support network" of friends, mentors, and relatives?

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak by phone with Kim Garrett, the executive director and founder of Palomar, the nonprofit Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, which opened its doors earlier this year and has already aided thousands of people. Drawing on the resources of hundreds of professionals and volunteers, Palomar helps OKC-area victims of violence -- that is, individuals from all walsk of life and their children -- by offering protection, hope, and healing in a single location; some 14 different organizations are all based on-site at Palomar.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about (brace yourself) dirty diapers and the parents who fixate on them. Our guest is Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, which is America's largest children's hospital. He tells us about his new book, which reveals the many useful solutions that he's both utilized and developed over the course of his distinguished career in addressing the digestive health problems of children.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) On this installment of ST, we chat with the British writer Kate Hamer, whose first novel has appeared here in the U.S. to widespread acclaim. "The Girl in the Red Coat," as an Amazon reviewer has noted of this book, recounts what is basically "every parent's nightmare: Beth, a single mother, takes her 8-year-old daughter, Carmel, to a local festival for some fun and frivolity and she vanishes. What follows is an unusual and terrifying journey for them both.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

(Note: This program originally aired in April.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

Pages