education

We at StudioTulsa have been enjoying some much-cherished vacation time these past two weeks -- and hopefully you, dear listeners, have likewise enjoyed our Encore Presentations of ST for the weeks of August 4th and August 11th. If you'd like to listen to any of these past programs, you'll find audio-stream buttons for them at the following links.

Could America's current student loan debt --- which now exceeds $1 trillion and is predicted to reach $2 trillion by 2020 --- somehow become the sequel to the mortgage meltdown? Some economists think it's possible. Our guest on this edition of ST is Eric Best, an Assistant Professor of Emergency Management at Jacksonville State University. Along with his father, sociologist Joel Best of the University of Delaware, Eric is the co-author of "The Student Loan Mess: How Good Intentions Created a Trillion-Dollar Problem" (University of California Press).

On May 23rd, the Oklahoma State Legislature approved HB 3399, a bill which would, if it became law, withdraw this state from the Common Core State Standards initiative. This bill is now on Gov. Mary Fallin's desk, awaiting her decision; the Governor has until June 7th to sign the bill into law, or veto it, or do nothing (in which case the bill will not take effect).

On this edition of our show, we speak with Myka Miller, who is a musician, teacher, and self-described (per one online bio) "agent for social change through music." Miller is also the executive director of the Los Angeles-based Harmony Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to music education for young people in low-income communities. Since taking the helm of this nonprofit in 2007, Miller has seen its number of enrolled students expand from 250 to 2,000 in and around Greater Los Angeles.

What if a bright young guy who had enough brains, training, and ambition to thrive on Wall Street suddenly decided --- in his mid-twenties, while watching an especially "passionate" pianist perform at a concert --- to give up on all the money and glory associated with his fledgling career...in order to start a small, independent nonprofit dedicated to building schools in the world's poorest regions? On this edition of ST, we meet just such a person.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation will present its 2014 National Symposium on Reconciliation in America on May 29th and 30th here in our city; the theme for this 5th annual symposium is "Education for Reconciliation." (You can learn more about this upcoming event here.) On today's installment of ST, we speak with the keynote speaker for that symposium, Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, who has been president of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Andrea Jobe, a local filmmaker whose latest offering is a 45-minute documentary about the history and development of Tulsa's Booker T. Washington High School. The school celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, and as Jobe tells us on today's program, her just-completed film profiles not just BTW but also the wider community of Tulsa.

Kids are wonderful. Kids are amazing. Kids enrich, brighten, and deepen our lives as parents, obviously. But they also change us --- in so many ways --- and "being a parent" in America today means something very different from what it meant, say, fifty or sixty years ago.

Our guest is Michael Smith, a professor of teaching and learning at the Temple University College of Education.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat by phone with Dr. John Ratey, an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School who's also well-known as an author, speaker, research synthesizer, and health/fitness/exercise advocate. Dr. Ratey will deliver a free-to-the-public address here in Tulsa on Sunday the 13th; the event happens in the Walter Arts Center at Holland Hall School (at 5666 East 81st Street), beginning at 7pm.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Peter Fisher, research director at the Iowa Policy Project, who co-wrote a recently published paper, "A Well-Educated Workforce Is Key to State Prosperity," for the Economic Analysis and Research Network.

Tulsa Public Schools

Voters within the Tulsa Public Schools district will go to the polls on May 14th to vote on a $38 million bond issue devoted to classroom technology as well as safety and security. Looking at facilities across the span of the district, we find that some schools have a student-to-computer ratio of 3:1, while in other schools that ratio is as high as 13:1. This bond will address those disparities, and will also provide funds for sprinkler systems within TPS's oldest schools as well as additional security at various entrances and exits. Our guest today is Dr.

On StudioTulsa today, we speak by phone with Dr. Steve Perry, a passionate, down-to-earth, and plainspoken --- make that outspoken --- education-reform advocate who's best known as the founder and principal of Capital Preparatory Magnet School in Hartford, Connecticut. This school has sent one-hundred percent of its predominantly low-income, minority, first-generation high-school graduates to four-year colleges every year since its first class graduated in 2006. Dr.

The Tulsa Youth Symphony, now comprised of more than 150 middle-school and high-school musicians from throughout Northeastern Oklahoma, will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year. For more than 40 of those years, our guest on ST has been at the helm of this outstanding local arts organization; in fact, just last month, Ron Wheeler --- who's been the CEO and conductor of the Tulsa Youth Symphony since 1972, and who's also a violinist with the Tulsa Symphony --- was given the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oklahoma Music Educators Association.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Ray Vandiver, the recently named (and very first) executive director of Tulsa Children's Museum (TCM). This facility has existed for the past few years as a "museum without walls" in our community, delivering performances and hands-on experiences to thousands of schoolchildren.

Dept. of Education

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma State Department of Education is releasing its new system to grade the state's schools.

State Superintendent Janet Barresi and other education leaders will release the new grading scale Monday afternoon at Crutcho Public Schools in Oklahoma City.

The system evaluates schools on an A-to-F grading scale.

The new system was approved by the Republican-controlled Legislature in 2011 as a way to provide easy-to-understand information to parents.

TU Only Oklahoma School On Best College List

Sep 12, 2012

U.S. News & World Report's 2013 edition of Best Colleges has named The University of Tulsa as the 83rd best national research university.

This marks the 10th consecutive year that TU has been listed in the top 100 national universities --- TU is the only Oklahoma university to be included in the top 100. The publication's 2013 rankings, released on Sept. 12th, also show TU at 48th among the nation’s private doctoral universities.

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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma State Board of Education is hearing appeals over state-mandated End of Instruction tests.

The board is hearing appeals Friday from students who did not pass the required number of tests in order to receive their high school diploma.

Beginning this year, high school seniors are required to score proficient in four of seven subjects to receive their diploma.

Board staff has recommended one student receive a waiver and be granted a diploma and that a second be denied a waiver. A third student's case is recommended for dismissal.

(Note: This program originally aired back in April.) We speak by phone with the noted performance poet, former middle-school teacher, and current teachers' advocate Taylor Mali. His new book --- "What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World" --- is based on a poem that he wrote several years ago, a spirited and encouraging defense of the teaching profession that has, by now, been seen and forwarded millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and elsewhere.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to speak with Dr. Geoffrey Orsak, who begins his tenure as TU's 18th president. Dr. Orsak was formerly Dean of the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University (SMU). He earned his bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in electrical and computer engineering from Rice University, and he's widely seen as one of the nation's outstanding leaders in engineering research and education. In recently announcing Dr. Orsak's presidential appointment, Duane Wilson of the TU Board of Trustees noted: "Dr.

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Legislative leaders and the governor’s budget deal does not include additional funding for education. School and city leaders in Tulsa say a flat budget will be devastating. Public school funding won’t increase under the budget agreement and Union Schools Superintendent Cathy Burden says it will mean cuts impacting the quality of education. She says while the district has lost millions in state funding since 2008, the number of students continues to grow.

"Homesick and Happy"

May 1, 2012

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, an informed discussion in praise of summer camp. Our guest is Michael Thompson, PhD, a consulting school psychologist and author who's widely known for his bestselling study of contemporary American boys and their emotions, "Raising Cain." Thompson's new book, just out as a Ballantine Trade Paperback Original, is "Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow." In this work, he offers an engaging and well-researched consideration of both the traditions and advantages of summer camp.

On today's program, we speak with Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Keith Ballard, who --- like every other school system administrator across Oklahoma --- is working hard to deal with the new reality of reduced state expenditures for education. Indeed, such aid is now lower than it was four years ago. Less and less money for schools, teachers, classrooms, and textbooks means more and more to be alarmed about, according to Dr.

"What Teachers Make"

Apr 6, 2012

On today's show, we speak by phone with the noted performance poet, former middle-school teacher, and current teachers' advocate Taylor Mali. His new book --- "What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World" --- is based on a poem that he wrote several years ago, a spirited and encouraging defense of the teaching profession that has, by now, been seen and forwarded millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and elsewhere. It's a poem that gave heart to an entire movement --- and in this book we get the story of what drove Mali to compose that poem in the first place.

On our show today, we speak with the accomplished and award-winning teacher and educational theorist who coined the term "culturally responsive pedagogy" --- Gloria Ladson-Billings --- who is the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Angered by a lawsuit challenging a scholarship program for children with disabilities, an Oklahoma lawmaker has introduced a bill that would abolish a section of the state constitution that prohibits the use of public money for religious purposes.

A resolution seeking a statewide vote passed the House Rules Committee on Wednesday on an 11-1 vote. If given final approval, the resolution would be placed on the November general election ballot.

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