Economics

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Nicholas Carnes, an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. He's a 2006 graduate of The University of Tulsa; in 2011, he received a doctorate in Politics and Social Policy at Princeton University. Last week, Dr. Carnes presented two lectures as part of TU's Distinguished Alumni Lectureship in Law and Politics. The talks he delivered were entitled "What's the Matter with Law School?

On today's ST, a detailed discussion of the currency problems affecting certain European countries --- namely, Greece, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland. We welcome to our show Dr. Stanley Black of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He's a highly respected economics professor who's also taught courses at Princeton, Vanderbilt, Yale, the Institute of International Economics in Stockholm, the University of Siena in Italy, the Brookings Institution, the International Monetary Fund, and the Free University in Berlin.

Our guest is Jeanne Marie Laskas, the director of the writing program at the University of Pittsburgh. She's also an acclaimed and accomplished journalist whose writing has appeared in GQ, The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian, and Esquire, among other publications.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with Matthew Yglesias, one of the nation's most widely-read political bloggers and columnists. Yglesias is a business and economics correspondent for Slate in Washington, DC, where he writes the Moneybox blog. He was previously a fellow at the Center for American Progress, an associate editor at The Atlantic, and a staff writer for the American Prospect.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James B. Steele. He and Donald L. Barlett are the nation's most honored investigative reporting team, having worked together for more than four decades. Now based at Vanity Fair magazine, Barlett and Steele are the only reporting team ever to have received two Pulitzer Prizes for newspaper reporting and two National Magazine Awards for magazine work. (Per the Columbia Journalism Review: "Barlett and Steele's preeminent talent is their knack for combining the micro and the macro. They look systemically at issues and policies, from the U.S.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the widely acclaimed author Arlie Russell Hochschild. Her most recent book is "The Outsourced Self: Intimate Life in Market Times." It's a readable and engaging --- and sometimes rather unsettling --- exploration of how, in so many different ways, the market enters (and profoundly alters) contemporary American life, particularly in this Internet Age.

(Note: This edition of ST first aired back in April.) A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

(Note: This show first aired back in April.) A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

(Please note: This show first aired back in March of this year.) Ever felt like quitting the whole earning-and-buying rat race? Ever wondered what it'd be like to live without a wallet, a car, a mortgage, or even a roof over your head?

The second regular session of the 53rd Oklahoma Legislature (2011-2012) was recently adjourned. (The state legislature will convene for its first regular session of the 54th Oklahoma Legislature [2013-2014] on January 8th, 2013.) With the session now over, many citizens are wondering why the legislature DIDN'T adopt a tax-cut plan. Wasn't this the oft-repeated aim of the GOP-controlled House, Senate, and Governor's Mansion?

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