Earth Science

What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a new book out. As he announces in this book, he eventually made a decision to change both his life and the world...and in both cases, for the better.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with Prof. Ryan Perroy, who teaches in the Dept. of Geography and Environmental Science at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. Prof. Perroy is currently visiting Tulsa, and he stopped by our studios to discuss how he studies and tracks various challenges associated with climate change in Hawaii, including rising sea-levels, warming temperatures, coral bleaches, and so on. He also speaks about how he and his colleagues employ state-of-the-art technology -- including drones -- to monitor these challenges.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

Why do some societies thrive while others fail? What makes certain societies more vengeful, more violent, or more war-driven than others? And what can we who live in the world's modern societies learn from those who dwell in -- or have dwelled in -- the world's traditional societies? Such are the questions we explore on this edition of StudioTulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, a discussion with Ziva Branstetter, the Enterprise Editor at the Tulsa World, where she's also the lead reporter for a three-part series of articles called "Quake Debate." The first of these articles appeared yesterday in that newspaper, and the second is in today's World.

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Anthony Barnosky, a Professor of Integrated Biology at UC-Berkeley and a leading scientist specializing on how global change affects biodiversity and ecosystem function.

"How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction"

Jul 11, 2013

"It's the end of the world as we know it," announces a nifty rock song by R.E.M. from 1987, "and I feel fine." Or as T.S. Eliot wrote in "The Hollow Men," a poem first published in 1925: "This is the way the world ends / This is the way the world ends / This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper." Ever wonder how it will all come to a close? What doomsday will look like?