Diplomacy

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat about President Donald Trump and the Middle East. Our guest is Daniel Benaim, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where he researches U.S. policy in the Middle East) as well as a visiting lecturer at New York University. He's also been a foreign-policy speechwriter at the White House, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Senate.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Joseph Cassidy, who is a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Previously, he was a longtime U.S. State Department diplomat, serving in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and South America. Cassidy is also, in the fall of 2017, acting as a Distinguished Visiting Fellow with the Center for International Business and Human Rights at the University of Oklahoma College of Law.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. What does this revolution mean to us today? How do remember it; what lessons or themes do we draw from it? And moreover, how is the revolution thought of by Russians themselves? On this edition of ST, we speak with Donald J. Raleigh, a Distinguished Professor of Russian History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

How, if at all, will the Israeli-Palenstinian conflict be affected by the Trump White House? Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa spoke on this topic last night at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). Gershon Baskin is the founder of the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, a joint public-policy think tank.

In late 2014, President Obama and Raúl Castro announced that the United States and Cuba would restore full diplomatic ties for the first time in more than 50 years. And late last month, of course, Fidel Castro died at age 90. So what happens next in U.S.-Cuban relations? Where do we go from here? Our guest on ST recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations that was focused on such questions. Ambassador Dennis K.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are talking about Tulsa Global Alliance, which is, per its website, is "a non-profit volunteer organization that connects people, companies, families, organizations, and students from Tulsa and Oklahoma with the rest of the world." Our guests are Tom Hemphill, the President and CEO of TGA, and Ken Busby, a former head of the TGA Governing Board.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a "Diplomacy Begins Here" summit happening today, Thursday the 31st, at the Gilcrease Museum. This event is presented by Tulsa Global Alliance and Global Ties Arkansas in partnership with The University of Tulsa, Global Ties U.S., and the U.S. Department of State. Our guest is Jennifer Clinton, president of Global Ties U.S., which was formerly known as the National Council for International Visitors.

As noted at Wikipedia: "Public diplomacy...broadly speaking, is the communication with foreign publics to establish a dialogue designed to inform and influence. There is no one definition of public diplomacy, and...definitions vary and continue to change over time. It is practiced through a variety of instruments and methods, ranging from personal contact and media interviews to the Internet and educational exchanges." On this installment of ST, we explore this hard-to-pin-down idea with a scholarly expert on such. Our guest is Dr.

On this installment of ST, a conversation about language and culture -- and their points of overlapping -- with Eduardo Faingold, who is Professor of Spanish and Linguistics here at the University of Tulsa. Faingold has served in the TU Department of Languages since 1995 and published eight books and 50 papers thus far in his career. Last month, he joined a well-regarded group of scholars responsible for analyzing language policy and advising the UN on both language minority rights and endangered languages.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we listen back to our conversation with author and journalist Scott Anderson, who has reported from Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Sudan, Bosnia, El Salvador, and other war- and strife-torn countries. Anderson's newest book, which he speaks about on today's show, is "Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East." One New York Times book critic has hailed this work as "fine, sophisticated, richly detailed...[and] filled with invaluably complex and fine-tuned information.... Eminently readable....

"Diplo-Mapping: The Maps Diplomats Draw and Their Consequences"

Nov 15, 2013

When lines are drawn on a map --- when the borders of a given state are finally, somehow, agreed upon --- how are the people and culture connected with these lines affected, both immediately and over time? How, and why, are societies or customs changed --- or not changed --- when such lines are established?

What does it take to be a successful diplomat? How does one best "train" or prepare for this type of work? And how, if at all, does the art of diplomacy differ from how it was, say, twenty or thirty years ago? A recent change of leadership at the U.S. State Department --- in the wake of last year's deadly attack on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, which resulted in the death of Ambassador Chris Stevens as well as three other Americans --- has reminded us, once again, of the serious challenges now facing the U.S. Foreign Service.