Classical Music

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an entertaining conversation with the celebrated British choral composer and conductor, Bob Chilcott, who sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, as both a boy and a university student. Known for his compositions for children's choirs and other vocal groups, Chilcott has worked in a wide array of musical settings; he's been composing music of his own since 1997.

On this installment of ST, a conversation with the Houston-based composer and pianist Pierre Jalbert. As presented by Chamber Music Tulsa, the widely acclaimed Weiss Kaplan Stumpf Trio will perform one of Jalbert's compositions at a Sunday afternoon concert on the 15th. The concert begins at 3pm in the Tulsa PAC's Williams Theatre, and Jalbert himself will be giving a pre-concert talk at 2:15pm.

On this edition of ST, a chat with Bruce Adolphe, the New York-based pianist and composer who's probably best known for his long-running gig as "The Piano Puzzler" on the classical public-radio show, Performance Today. He'll be giving a free-to-the-public address on Saturday the 14th in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus; the talk begins at 7pm and will focus on humor in music.

Jiro Schneider / Frank Salomon Agency

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will perform this coming Monday evening (the 9th) in a concert featuring Spanish Renaissance music, Manuel De Falla's "El Amor Brujo," and a range of eclectic works ranging from English composer John Dowland to Chet Atkins and Dweezil Zappa. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with one of this Grammy Award-winning ensemble's members, former Tulsan Matthew Greif.

Giacomo Puccini's "La Boheme" is, of course, the musically sumptuous tale of four young Parisienne bohemians and their loves and losses. (It's also, as many of us know, the basis for "Rent.") Tulsa Opera's 68th season gets underway this weekend with this popular opera. Karin Wolverton stars as Mimi, and Sony Music recording artist Nathan Granner (of "American Tenors" fame) makes his company and role debut as Rodolfo. We're joined on this edition of ST by Tulsa Opera's artistic director, and conductor for the production, Kostis Protopapas, who talks in detail about this opera.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Hege, who is the newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony. Tomorrow night, Saturday the 26th, at 7:30pm, the symphony will present its first Tulsa PAC concert of the new season; it's an evening entitled "Experience the Exotic." On the program: Rimsky-Korsakov's famous tone poem, "Scheherazade," as well as Liszt's "Piano Concerto No.

Tulsa Ballet gets its new season underway this evening at 8pm (Friday the 11th) with an all-new, three-part "Creations in Studio K" program. This show will feature world-premiere pieces from Jorma Elo (resident choreographer for Boston Ballet), Dwight Rhoden (artistic director of Complexions Contemporary Ballet), and Tulsa Ballet resident choreographer Ma Cong. Performances will happen September 11th through the 20th in Tulsa Ballet's 300-seat Studio K Theater.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the nonprofit program known as Sistema Tulsa. Per its website, Sistema Tulsa "envisions how a comprehensive and inclusive music program can positively impact the social, cognitive, and aesthetic realms of youth development. Supported by partnerships with the Boston Avenue United Methodist Church and the Tulsa Public Schools, Sistema Tulsa plans to provide a model for accessible, ensemble-based music programs that enrich the lives of local youth across varied underserved communities.

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing series of interviews with organizations vying to be included in the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. This extension is expected to go before voters in the spring of 2016, and over the past couple of months, many area organizations (from Gilcrease Museum to the Tulsa Zoo; from Tulsa Transit to Langston University) have been presenting proposals in this regard to the Tulsa City Council. We at StudioTulsa are speaking with certain of those groups whose ideas seem especially interesting and/or feasible.

Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.