City of Tulsa

On this installment on ST, we chat with Steve Gerkin, who is originally from Iowa, has lived in Tulsa for more than 35 years, retired from his general dentistry practice in 2010, and has written a number of interesting articles for This Land Press about little-known aspects of Tulsa-area history. Gerkin has gathered several of these articles into a book, "Hidden History of Tulsa," which has just been published.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Myka Miller, who is a musician, teacher, and self-described (per one online bio) "agent for social change through music." Miller is also the executive director of the Los Angeles-based Harmony Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to music education for young people in low-income communities. Since taking the helm of this nonprofit in 2007, Miller has seen its number of enrolled students expand from 250 to 2,000 in and around Greater Los Angeles.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to an interview we did about a year ago with Jonathan Rossetti, who directed, stars in, and co-scripted "Home, James," a newly released indie feature film that was made here in T-Town...and that's now (or was recently) playing --- thanks to a distribution deal with Devolver Digital Films --- in New York City, Los Angeles, Portland, and the aforesaid Tulsa; "Home, James" will be screened at the Circle Cinema (near the corner of Admiral and Lewis) through May 29th.

On this edition of ST, we speak with a big-thinking, fast-talking, highly motivated, and fairly progressive entrepreneur who's made and lost several fortunes: Bill Bartmann is best known as the founder and CEO of Commercial Financial Services (or CFS), a debt-collection company that actually treated its debtors with respect and fairness. CFS was based in Tulsa, operated from 1986 to 1999, and was for a time amazingly successful as a business --- but the fast-growing company fell apart amid charges of illegal stock trades and bogus debt sales.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Andrea Jobe, a local filmmaker whose latest offering is a 45-minute documentary about the history and development of Tulsa's Booker T. Washington High School. The school celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, and as Jobe tells us on today's program, her just-completed film profiles not just BTW but also the wider community of Tulsa.


Injuries to city of Tulsa workers reach a six year low, and officials believe a new Safety First Program is mostly responsible. Since implementation of the safety transformation project, the city overall has reduced the number of serious work-related injuries by 22%. Water and Sewer Director Clayton Edwards says the numbers are even better in his department, worker injuries dropped by 36%.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Jeff Martin, the creator and host of Book Smart Tulsa, the popular reading series here in our city that's now celebrating its fifth anniversary. Book Smart is marking the occasion with three different events this week, on Tuesday the 11th, Thursday the 13th, and Friday the 14th.

File photo

The Indian Nations Council of Governments (or INCOG) is a voluntary group of local and tribal governments in the Greater Tulsa community that offers planning and coordination services to help with such ongoing Tulsa metro-area challenges as land use, transportation, community and economic development, environmental quality, public safety, and services for older adults. Last year, INCOG put forth a mass-transit master plan, and now --- in an effort that will roll out next week as well as later in the spring --- INCOG is offering a bike-and-pedestrian master plan.

The Tulsa Voice, a new publication on the city's print-media landscape which hits newsstands every first and third Wednesday, and which grew out of the now-defunct Urban Tulsa Weekly, has been attracting the attention of readers for its sleek design, quality writing, and focused arts/cultural coverage. The publication originated late last year, and our guest today on ST is Natasha Ball, its managing editor, who addresses The Tulsa Voice's presence and purpose in our community --- as an arbiter and chronicler of the local arts scene as well as an observer and participant in same.

Anyone residing in or near the City of Tulsa must be aware of the profound and ongoing influence that the George Kaiser Family Foundation has had on this community. Whether through its socially minded programs like Women in Recovery or Tulsa Educare, or through such dramatic civic-improvement initiatives as the Brady Arts District revitalization, the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood development, or the Tulsa River Parks Trails refurbishment, it's clear that the foundation has significantly improved both the well-being and quality of life for those who live and work in Northeastern Oklahoma.