City of Tulsa

KWGS News

It’s been almost a month since the wind storm that did so much tree damage in Tulsa. Crews have picked up more than 44-thousand cubic yards of debris…enough to cover almost 200 football fields three feet deep. City Spokesman Bob Bledsoe says it’s still going to take a while to finish the job.

He estimates it will likely take at least another two or three weeks to complete the cleanup. There is a map on-line at cityoftulsa.org/debris that shows where crews are working and when they will get to your neighborhood.

Today on our program, we're discussing a new and exciting group show on display at Living Arts of Tulsa (at 307 East Brady) --- a wide-ranging exhibition that aims to "celebrate or critique the City of Tulsa." It's the "Oh, Tulsa!" Biennial, collecting works by one hundred of our community's finest artists --- both known and unknown --- and it opens tonight (Friday the 2nd) at the Living Arts space, from 6pm till 9pm; this opening gala is part of the Brady District's First Friday Art Crawl.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Mike Brose, who's been the executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa since 1993. (You'll find a full bio for Brose here.) Back in '93, when Brose first arrived, the Association (as it's often called) could only house 12 people; today, it provides housing for approximately 875 individuals and families, many of whom are battling mental illness and/or overcoming homelessness.

City of Tulsa

The Tulsa City Council is now moving forward on a $919 million capital improvement project that would continue this community's Fix Our Streets sales tax and property taxes for an additional 5 to 5.5 years in order to fund continued street construction, rehabilitation and widening projects, and a number of other capital improvement projects. Capital improvement, you ask? Well, it's not money for more police officers or more fire-fighters, as our guest notes today, but more money for the cars, trucks, and other equipment these city employees need to do their job (as but one example).

On this installment of our show, we welcome back Dr. Todd Lasseigne, President and CEO of the Tulsa Botanic Garden (which is the new name for the nonprofit facility formerly known as the Oklahoma Centennial Botanical Garden). Back in December, as Dr. Lasseigne tells us, his organization proudly announced a twenty-five-year master plan, which envisions developing some 60 acres of gardens at the Tulsa Botanic Garden site over the next quarter-century, with the site's remaining 110 acres to be maintained as an untouched expanse of natural beauty.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Jan Figart, an Associate Director and Senior Planner in Maternal and Child Health at the Community Service Council (or CSC) of Tulsa. As such, Figart serves CSC by overseeing the development of community collaboratives, staff support for coalitions, program development, grant writing, program evaluation, and analysis of community trends.

KWGS News File Photo

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Jeff Stava, a senior program officer for the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the project manager for the new, privately-funded, still-in-development public park known as A Gathering Place for Tulsa. The final design plans for the Riverside-based park (to be created on the site of the Blair Mansion) were announced Tuesday the 18th.

This weekend --- beginning Friday the 14th --- the Tulsa community will welcome Philbrook Downtown, a new satellite space of the Philbrook Museum of Art, which was founded in 1938 and opened in 1939. Philbrook Downtown is a 30,000-square-foot, modern-style facility located in the city's vibrant Brady Arts District; it's comprised in a brick building that formerly housed a historic warehouse, and it's situated just steps away from several other newly created arts/cultural institutions in downtown Tulsa.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Jonathan Rossetti, a young actor/writer/director who grew up in Tulsa and is now based in Los Angeles. Rossetti joins us by phone from Oklahoma City, where his newly completed indie film, "Home, James," will have its public debut tomorrow, Saturday the 8th, at 2pm at the Harkins Bricktown Cinema 2. "Home, James," which Rossetti directed, co-wrote, and stars in, is appearing as part of OKC's annual deadCenter Film Festival.

City of Tulsa

On this installment of ST, we offer the third and final interview in our three-part series of conversations with the leading candidates to be Tulsa's next mayor. As per changes to the City Charter that were enacted in 2011, the current race for mayor will be non-partisan, with a primary scheduled for Tuesday of next week: June 11th.

Today on ST, we continue our three-part series of conversations with the leading candidates to be the City of Tulsa's next mayor. As per changes to the City Charter that were enacted in 2011, the current race for mayor will be non-partisan, with a primary scheduled for Tuesday of next week: June 11th.

Today on ST, we begin a three-part series of conversations with the leading candidates to be the City of Tulsa's next mayor. As per changes to the City Charter that were enacted in 2011, the current race for mayor will be non-partisan, with a primary scheduled for Tuesday of next week: June 11th.

Tulsa Public Schools

Voters within the Tulsa Public Schools district will go to the polls on May 14th to vote on a $38 million bond issue devoted to classroom technology as well as safety and security. Looking at facilities across the span of the district, we find that some schools have a student-to-computer ratio of 3:1, while in other schools that ratio is as high as 13:1. This bond will address those disparities, and will also provide funds for sprinkler systems within TPS's oldest schools as well as additional security at various entrances and exits. Our guest today is Dr.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Paul Kent, Executive Director of Tulsa Habitat for Humanity. This cherished, local nonprofit will mark its 25th anniversary this year --- the national Habitat organization, by the way, is about a dozen or so years older --- and the Tulsa chapter is also on track to build its 300th house in our community this coming fall.

Today on ST we speak by phone with Benjamin Lytal, who grew up in Tulsa and now resides in Chicago, and who has written for The Wall Street Journal, The London Review of Books, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Sun, The Believer, McSweeney's, and other publications. Lytal's first novel, "A Map of Tulsa," has just been published, and he'll be doing a free reading/signing in connection with this book tonight (Tuesday the 26th) at the Harwelden Mansion here in Tulsa at 7pm.

On this edition of ST, with Spring Break now in effect, we're discussing some new changes and enhancements at that ever-popular Spring Break destination known as the Tulsa Zoo. For openers, the Robert J. LaFortune WildLIFE Trek, formerly known as the North American Living Museum, was unveiled to the public on Saturday the 16th; it's a four-building complex that houses everything from grizzly bears to naked mole rats to albino alligators. Also, there's a new exhibit on display in the zoo's African Plains section that features three highly endangered African Painted Dogs.

In 1901, the first-ever oil well in Tulsa (from the Creek word, "Tallasi," meaning "Old Town") was established; the city itself had been officially incorporated in 1898. In 1905, the discovery of the fabled Glenn Pool oil field occurred --- and a boom town was born. And not just any boom town, but a petroleum-driven city-on-the-go, as Tulsa's population climbed to more than 140,000 between 1901 and 1930. On this edition of ST, we revisit the pivotal decade in this remarkable growth spurt as we discuss a new exhibit at the Tulsa Historical Society (or THS).

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Ray Vandiver, the recently named (and very first) executive director of Tulsa Children's Museum (TCM). This facility has existed for the past few years as a "museum without walls" in our community, delivering performances and hands-on experiences to thousands of schoolchildren.

On this installment of ST, we debut an ongoing series of occasional, health-related interviews called StudioTulsa on Health. In this series, guest host Dr. John Schumann of OU-Tulsa, who's also a regular commentator for our program, will discuss matters of health care, health policy, and healthy living with people from throughout our community --- and, moreover, with individuals from throughout the wider fields of medicine and medical scholarship (whether they're active in these fields nationally or globally).

On Sunday the 16th, from 1pm till 5pm, AHHA --- a/k/a the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa's Hardesty Arts Center --- will have its Grand Opening. Finishing touches are, even now, still being applied to the impressive space, which is to be located at 101 East Archer Street. Apart from introducing this most-welcome new arts facility to the public, the opening will also mark the inauguration of the first-ever exhibition at AHHA, which is the "Concept/OK" show, presented by the Oklahoma Visual Artists Coalition (or OVAC).

Our guest on this installment of ST is Ken Busby, the Executive Director and CEO of the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa, which is, per its website, the long-standing "champion of area arts and culture.

In many cities across this country, urban planning initiatives are often celebrated for their fresh ideas or green principles, their small-town feeling or street-level appeal, their overall city-friendly yet neighborly vibe. But getting the folks in a given community to support urban planning goals before they have actually occurred is difficult to do --- mainly because such goals can seem too abstract, too hard to visualize or imagine.

On this edition of our show, we get an update on Tulsa's Regional Transit System Plan, which is also known as Fast Forward. The plan was adopted last year, in October of 2011, and operations are now moving forward on the first major enhancement to the current Tulsa Transit set-up. That first enhancement is a proposed BRT, or Bus Rapid Transit, that would run along the lengthy Peoria/Riverside Corridor (which is 20+ miles long, from Far North to Far South Tulsa).

City Computers Hacked! Websites Off Line

Sep 12, 2012
KWGS News

                City of Tulsa authorities have learned that information on one of the City’s computer servers, which hosts the City of Tulsa website, was targeted by an unknown source. Technology officers with the City have taken the websites temporarily offline while they work to identify the extent and nature of the incident.   City officials have confirmed that no City of Tulsa water or refuse utility customer information was ever accessed. We can assure our customers that no financial information associated with their accounts was involved.

Just when we thought the recently revitalized Downtown Tulsa really couldn't get any cooler.... Guthrie Green, a new park located at the corner of Boston Avenue and Brady Street --- in the heart of Tulsa's increasingly thriving Brady Arts District --- opens today, Friday the 7th, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 3pm. Then, at about 5pm, the music gets underway --- and live, festive, free-to-the-public music (of all kinds, for all tastes) is a big part of what this Opening Weekend for Guthrie Green is all about.

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TulsaNow, which has been around for more than a decade, is a non-profit organization whose mission is to "help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable, and prosperous city of our size.

On today's StudioTulsa, we hear about Vision2, the proposal by Tulsa County to extend the Vision 2025 six-tenths-of-a-penny sales tax that is set to expire in 2017.

Theatre Tulsa @ 90

Aug 24, 2012

On this edition of ST, we're talking about the past, present, and future of Theatre Tulsa, one of the oldest arts organizations in the state. Established in 1922, Theatre Tulsa is actually the oldest community theatre west of the Mississippi River. Over the years, it's brought hundreds of productions to the people of Tulsa. It premiered the first-ever community theatre productions of "Our Town" in 1939, "All My Sons" in 1947, and "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change" in 1993.

On this encore edition of ST, we speak with the Tulsa-based writer, consultant, and activist Ann Patton, who's published a biography of the late Father Dan Allen, a Catholic priest turned social activist who worked incessantly (and memorably) to combat poverty and promote equality in Tulsa in the 1960s and beyond. Father Dan is probably best known for creating the Tulsa-area social service agency, Neighbor for Neighbor, which is still around today.

On this edition of our show, we hear from Michael Brose and Greg Shinn of the Mental Health Association of Tulsa. Over the years, MHAT has been assembling properties to offer housing to the chronically homeless. Today, they have over 650 units of housing --- and an amazing track record of getting people off the streets and into permanent housing. Their approach is labeled "Housing First," and according to the most recent census, there are fewer than 100 chronic homeless on Tulsa's streets today.

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