City of Tulsa

On this edition of ST, we speak with Andrea Jobe, a local filmmaker whose latest offering is a 45-minute documentary about the history and development of Tulsa's Booker T. Washington High School. The school celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, and as Jobe tells us on today's program, her just-completed film profiles not just BTW but also the wider community of Tulsa.

KWGS News

Injuries to city of Tulsa workers reach a six year low, and officials believe a new Safety First Program is mostly responsible. Since implementation of the safety transformation project, the city overall has reduced the number of serious work-related injuries by 22%. Water and Sewer Director Clayton Edwards says the numbers are even better in his department, worker injuries dropped by 36%.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Jeff Martin, the creator and host of Book Smart Tulsa, the popular reading series here in our city that's now celebrating its fifth anniversary. Book Smart is marking the occasion with three different events this week, on Tuesday the 11th, Thursday the 13th, and Friday the 14th.

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The Indian Nations Council of Governments (or INCOG) is a voluntary group of local and tribal governments in the Greater Tulsa community that offers planning and coordination services to help with such ongoing Tulsa metro-area challenges as land use, transportation, community and economic development, environmental quality, public safety, and services for older adults. Last year, INCOG put forth a mass-transit master plan, and now --- in an effort that will roll out next week as well as later in the spring --- INCOG is offering a bike-and-pedestrian master plan.

The Tulsa Voice, a new publication on the city's print-media landscape which hits newsstands every first and third Wednesday, and which grew out of the now-defunct Urban Tulsa Weekly, has been attracting the attention of readers for its sleek design, quality writing, and focused arts/cultural coverage. The publication originated late last year, and our guest today on ST is Natasha Ball, its managing editor, who addresses The Tulsa Voice's presence and purpose in our community --- as an arbiter and chronicler of the local arts scene as well as an observer and participant in same.

Anyone residing in or near the City of Tulsa must be aware of the profound and ongoing influence that the George Kaiser Family Foundation has had on this community. Whether through its socially minded programs like Women in Recovery or Tulsa Educare, or through such dramatic civic-improvement initiatives as the Brady Arts District revitalization, the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood development, or the Tulsa River Parks Trails refurbishment, it's clear that the foundation has significantly improved both the well-being and quality of life for those who live and work in Northeastern Oklahoma.

A Conversation with Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz

Jan 15, 2014
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There's been a lot of talk lately about Tulsa County's seriously over-crowded jail and its woefully under-funded juvenile justice system. Thus certain Tulsa County officials are currently holding --- that is, this week and next --- a series of public meetings all over the county in order to a.) explain these separate yet related problems, and b.) make the case for a .067-cent tax, which the officials say will fix these issues. Our guest on ST is Stanley Glanz, who's served as the Sheriff of Tulsa County since 1989.

What motivates a person --- or a business --- to make a philanthropic gift? And are such gifts more common or less common in this country than they were, say, a generation or two ago? What sorts of philanthropic gifts are most popular these days, and why? And how have things like the internet and the global economy changed philanthropic giving? Today on StudioTulsa, we're talking about philanthropy --- and about certain financial, economic, ethical, personal, and philosophical questions related to it --- with two local experts on this topic.

On Tuesday of next week, November 12th, the citizens of Tulsa won't just cast a ballot for Kathy Taylor or Dewey Bartlett. They'll also vote on the $918-million "Improve Our Tulsa" capital improvements package, which is intended to fund improvements to our city's infrastructure --- with 70% of the package being devoted to street repair/repaving/refurbishment alone.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we present the second in our two-part series of interviews with the candidates appearing on the ballot for Mayor in the upcoming November 12th general election here in the City of Tulsa. On today's program, we hear from Republican Dewey F. Bartlett, Jr., the current Mayor of our city, who was elected to this post on November 10, 2009, and who is seeking re-election.

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