Chamber Music

On this edition of our show, we learn about the next concert to be staged by the Signature Symphony at TCC, "Yevtushenko and Shostakovich," which will happen on Saturday night, the 4th, at 7:30pm (at the Van Trease PACE on East 81st Street). This concert will honor the life and work of Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the late poet and author who died earlier this year, and who taught at the University of Tulsa and contributed to our city's cultural life over the last 30 years.

Tomorrow night, Saturday the 16th, the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will open its new season with a Gala Concert at the Tulsa PAC (beginning at 8pm). On the program, the "Hungarian Dances No. 1 and No. 5" by Brahms, the "Miraculous Mandarin Suite" by Bartok, and the masterful " Piano Concerto No. 2" by Brahms (which will feature a special guest soloist, the noted pianist Jon Kimura Parker).

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Daniel Hege, the Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra, who returns to our show to speak about the final TSO concert of the season (for which he'll be at the helm). That concert will happen tomorrow night, Saturday the 13th, at the Tulsa PAC. On the program, three "can't miss" favorites: Haydn's "Symphony No. 90," Kodaly's "Háry János Suite," and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" (the 1945 version). Please note that you can access more information about this concert here.

Dylan went electric. Miles went electric. Everyone, it seems, has gone electric by now...but what about the world of classical music? How common is it to witness, say, an "amp'd up" chamber music trio? On this edition of ST, our guest is the noted Tulsa-based composer, musician, and music educator, Noam Faingold, who's also the curator of the upcoming OK Electric music festival. This festival will happen Friday and Saturday night, the 28th and 29th, at Living Arts of Tulsa.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Daniel Hege, the Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra. Hege is back in town to conduct the TSO's next concert, which happens tomorrow night (Saturday the 14th) at 7:30pm in the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall. This concert will feature Beethoven's Symphony No. 4  as well as works by Mendelssohn ("The Hebrides") and Ravel ("Le tombeau de Couperin" and "Tzigane").

Our guest is Bruce Sorrell, Executive Director of Chamber Music Tulsa, or CMT, who tells us about the upcoming Beethoven Winter Festival that his wonderful organization is presenting next month. As noted at the CMT website: "The Beethoven Winter Festival, happening February 17-26, 2017, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, takes both a mental and musical journey with the composer when the Miro Quartet performs all 16 of Beethoven's string quartets in chronological order over six concerts.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Philip Mann, the music director of the Arkansas Symphony, who's also been an assistant conductor for performances with the Cleveland Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, and Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a 2008 discussion with author and journalist Steve Lopez about his bestselling nonfiction account, "The Soloist: A Lost Dream, an Unlikely Friendship, and the Redemptive Power of Music." At that time, this book -- which explores themes of mental illness, homelessness, artistic inspiration, and creativity -- had just come out; it was later the basis for major motion picture of the same title.

On this edition of ST, we present an interesting chat with the noted American composer and conductor Michael Daugherty, whose musical works seem to delight in the wide range of American pop culture; he's thus created classical/pop crossover compositions inspired by (to name but a few) Jackie O, Elvis, and Superman.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting discussion with the diversely talented Tulsa-based composer, performer, conductor, and music educator Noam Faingold. He serves as director of the Barthelmes Conservatory, teaches in the Department of Music at TU, is on the board at Chamber Music Tulsa, and is also the curator for the OK Electric Music Festival, which will happen this weekend (April 8th and 9th) at Living Arts of Tulsa (at 307 East Brady in downtown Tulsa).

On this edition of ST, we get to know the young piano virtuosos Yaron Kohlberg and Bishara Haroni, who are among the leading classical pianists of their generation in their respective homelands: Israel and Palestine. For the past few years, they have performed together as Duo Amal -- the word "amal" means "hope," by the way -- appearing pretty much all over the globe, from the Beijing Concert Hall to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Tonight, Tuesday the 29th, they will perform at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC.

(Note: This show first aired last year.) Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Benjamin Zander, the noted conductor, music educator, public speaker, and author of "The Art of Possibility." Maestro Zander is here in town to give a sold-out address to the Tulsa Town Hall tomorrow morning, Friday the 11th, and also to conduct the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra on Saturday night (the 12th; beginning at 7:30pm) in a performance of Mahler's magnificent Resurrection Symphony (a/k/a Symphony No. 2).

On this edition of ST, we chat with Sarah Ioannides, who currently is the conductor for the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra, and who's been described by The New York Times as a conductor of "unquestionable strength and authority." Ioannides will be the guest conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra tomorrow night, Saturday the 20th, when the TSO presents its next concert.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an entertaining conversation with the celebrated British choral composer and conductor, Bob Chilcott, who sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, as both a boy and a university student. Known for his compositions for children's choirs and other vocal groups, Chilcott has worked in a wide array of musical settings; he's been composing music of his own since 1997.

On this installment of ST, a conversation with the Houston-based composer and pianist Pierre Jalbert. As presented by Chamber Music Tulsa, the widely acclaimed Weiss Kaplan Stumpf Trio will perform one of Jalbert's compositions at a Sunday afternoon concert on the 15th. The concert begins at 3pm in the Tulsa PAC's Williams Theatre, and Jalbert himself will be giving a pre-concert talk at 2:15pm.

On this edition of ST, a chat with Bruce Adolphe, the New York-based pianist and composer who's probably best known for his long-running gig as "The Piano Puzzler" on the classical public-radio show, Performance Today. He'll be giving a free-to-the-public address on Saturday the 14th in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus; the talk begins at 7pm and will focus on humor in music.

Jiro Schneider / Frank Salomon Agency

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will perform this coming Monday evening (the 9th) in a concert featuring Spanish Renaissance music, Manuel De Falla's "El Amor Brujo," and a range of eclectic works ranging from English composer John Dowland to Chet Atkins and Dweezil Zappa. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with one of this Grammy Award-winning ensemble's members, former Tulsan Matthew Greif.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the nonprofit program known as Sistema Tulsa. Per its website, Sistema Tulsa "envisions how a comprehensive and inclusive music program can positively impact the social, cognitive, and aesthetic realms of youth development. Supported by partnerships with the Boston Avenue United Methodist Church and the Tulsa Public Schools, Sistema Tulsa plans to provide a model for accessible, ensemble-based music programs that enrich the lives of local youth across varied underserved communities.

Our guest is Sara Solovitch, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer whose articles have appeared in Esquire, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. She has also been a health columnist for the San Jose Mercury News -- and she seriously studied piano in her younger days. These formative at-the-keyboard experiences greatly influence her first book, which Solovitch discusses with us today.

On this edition of ST, an interesting conversation with Dr. Margaret Martin, who more than a decade ago founded The Harmony Project, beginning with 36 students and a $9,000 check from The Rotary Club of Hollywood; today, The Harmony Project is the largest nonprofit in Los Angeles dedicated exclusively to music education for youth in low-income communities.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Jeffrey Zeigler, the gifted cello player and composer who's best known for his eight-year tenure with the internationally known Kronos Quartet. Since leaving that collective about two years ago, Zeigler has embarked on an interesting (and decidedly multi-genre) solo career that's found him collaborating with a host of fascinating musicians -- such as singer/songwriter Norah Jones, avant-jazz guru John Zorn, pianist Vijay Iyer, composer Philip Glass, Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche, and so forth.

On Saturday the 24th, in a performance beginning at 8pm, the highly acclaimed Rastrelli Cello Quartet will return to Tulsa. The concert happens at the Williams Theatre in the Tulsa Performing Arts Center and is presented by Choregus Productions. Our guest is the founder and artistic director of this group, Kira Kraftzoff. As he explains, the Rastrelli has been deliberately focused on -- and enthusiastically passionate about -- what classical music buffs sometimes call "non-traditional programming" since its inception in 2002.

On this edition of ST, we learn all about the bART Center for Music (formerly known as the Barthelmes Conservatory). This nonprofit organization, per its website, was "founded in 2001.... Its sole purpose is to provide music education for the larger Tulsa community... The Center offers superior private music lessons for piano, cello, violin, viola, bass, flute, African drums, voice, and guitar for all ages and abilities." Our guests are Bill Andoe, the newly named Executive Director of the bART Center, and John Rush, its Artistic Director.

Tomorrow night, Saturday the 6th, at the Tulsa PAC, the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will present a winter- and holiday-themed concert with Steven Smith as Guest Conductor. This is Smith's second appearance with the TSO, and he's our guest on ST today. On the program for tomorrow evening, Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor (with violinist Rossitza Jekova-Goza as the soloist) as well as two selections from Tchaikovsky: the seldom-heard-but-excellent Symphony No. 1 in G minor (a/k/a "Winter Dreams") and, of course, Selections from The Nutcracker.

The Signature Symphony at TCC has narrowed its search for a new artistic director and conductor to three finalists: Andrés Franco, Michael Rossi, and Timothy Verville.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone to Joshua Gindele, a founding member of -- and the cellist for -- the world-renowned Miró Quartet, which will soon perform here in Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Timothy Verville, who will be the guest conductor with the Signature Symphony at the TCC Van Trease PACE (at 10300 E. 81st Street) tomorrow night (Saturday the 27th).

On this installment of ST, we speak with harpist Janet Witman, whose accomplished career in music has taken her from the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia to the Salzedo Harp Colony in Maine (where she worked with the legendary Alice Chalifoux). Witman, based in Pennsylvania, has performed as a soloist with the Allentown Symphony, the Hilton Head Orchestra, Concerto Soloists of Philadelphia, Providence Chamber Orchestra, the Wheatland Chorale, and other ensembles.

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