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Severe Weather Information From KWGS News

Here is your one stop location for information you need concerning our severe weather threat in Green Country. Click here for the latest weather radar information from the Oklahoma MesonetAt this link you will find the latest severe weather watches and warnings for all of Oklahoma.For a discussion on the severe weather threat from the Tulsa National Weather Service office.The latest information from the National Storms Prediction Center can be found here.To download the Red Cross Tornado App...
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Tulsa Regional Chamber

Public Education Officials Agree State of Education is Underfunded

Officials in each of Oklahoma’s three public education systems say the state of education is poorly funded. At their state of education forum, leaders with the Tulsa Regional Chamber said students going on summer break will come back to drastically different schools as new cuts take effect. Tulsa Superintendent Deborah Gist said on top of that, decades of underfunding have left Oklahomans unaware of what they don’t have but should in K–12 schools. "We do not do enough to support our students...
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North Carolina Files Lawsuit Defending Its 'Bathroom Law'

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit src="http://www.google-analytics.com/__utm.gif?utmac=UA-5828686-4&utmdt=North+Carolina+Files+Lawsuit+Defending+Its+%27Bathroom+Law%27&utme=8(APIKey)9(MDA5MTYwMDQ1MDEzMzE1ODcyMjRmY2FlMA004)"/>
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome back to our show Marcello Angelini, the longtime artistic director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about the company's latest production. It's a three-part evening -- entitled "Signature Series" -- that features some of Angelini's favorite ballets: "Serenade" by George Balanchine (music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky), "Remansos" by Nacho Duato (music by Enrique Granados), and "Infra" by Wayne McGregor (music by Max Richter).

Tomorrow night, Thursday the 5th, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and Tulsa City-County Library (or TCCL) will jointly present the 19th Annual Yom HaShoah, which is an Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration happening at Temple Israel (near Utica Square in Tulsa). It's free to the public and begins at 7pm; the theme for this year's gathering is "Close to Evil." The keynote speaker at this special event will be Tomi Reichental, who is our guest today on StudioTulsa.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July of last year.) On this presentation of ST, we chat with Joe Randazzo, a former editor of The Onion and former creative director of adultswim.com who now writes for the Comedy Central program called @midnight.

More StudioTulsa

Is Klingon A Living Language? That's For (Human) Courts To Decide

A new lawsuit is boldly going where no man has gone before.Paramount Pictures and CBS are suing the producers of a Star Trek fan film for copyright infringement. The studios own the copyright to the Star Trek franchise, including six television shows and 12 movies.They're suing Axanar Productions along with executive producer Alec Peters over their 2014 short film Prelude to Axanar, and the planned full-length Axanar. Peters raised more than $101,000 on Kickstarter to make the first film, and...
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With Monday's departure of reporter Jennifer Robison from the Las Vegas Review-Journal, none of the three journalists who helped uncover the secret sale of the newspaper to casino magnate Sheldon Adelson remains at the company.

Robison, who took a job in communications for Pacific Gas and Electric Company in San Francisco, left after the exits of her former colleagues, reporters Howard Stutz and James DeHaven.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has made some of the state's temporary water restrictions permanent. The executive order, in response to the state's drought, permanently bans wasteful practices like hosing sidewalks and washing cars with hoses that don't have shut-off nozzles.

The speaker of Brazil's lower house of Congress on Monday annulled last month's vote on the impeachment of embattled President Dilma Rousseff. But shortly afterward, the leader of Brazil's Senate announced he will ignore the lower house leader's decision and press on with the impeachment process.

The political seesawing further complicates the already chaotic struggle for political power in Brazil's government.

Bernie Sanders has some of the most ambitious and sweeping policy proposals of all the presidential candidates. His campaign has centered on a promise of "revolution."

When King Salman assumed the throne in Saudi Arabia last year, he was pushing 80, his health was questionable and many thought he would be more a caretaker than a monarch of note.

Yet Salman has unleashed major initiatives and shaken up the kingdom, setting a course for change in a land where the watchwords have long been tradition, stability and continuity.

West Point is investigating whether black female cadets violated any rules by raising their fists in a photo. The 16 women, following school tradition, posed in historical-style uniforms ahead of graduation later this month.

The investigation will look into whether the cadets violated the school honor code or a Department of Defense rule about political activities while in the Armed Forces.

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists just released a searchable database with the names of more than 300,000 people and companies included in the so-called "Panama Papers."

The database is barebones, containing the name of the entity and how its connected to an offshore account.

Private Medicare Advantage plans treating the elderly have overbilled the government by billions of dollars, but rarely been forced to repay the money or face other consequences for their actions, according to a congressional audit released Monday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Today on ST, we speak by phone with Douglas T. Kenrick, a professor of psychology at Arizona State University. He's also one of the co-authors of a recent book, "The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think," which a reviewer for Mother Jones magazine calls "a fun romp through the comedy of human errors. Again and again, the authors find, evolutionary urges and hardwired brains explain behaviors rational economists cannot.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with John Geiger, the bestselling author of "The Third Man Factor" and "Frozen in Time," among other books. A member of the editorial board of the Toronto Globe and Mail, Geiger is, moreover, a fellow of the Explorers Club and the chair of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Expeditions Committee.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, speaks with us about her latest book, which is a collection of essays on how we as human beings perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Rick Hanson, a neuropsychologist and author whose books include "Buddha's Brain," "Just One Thing," and "Mother Nurture." Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat by phone with Dr. John Ratey, an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School who's also well-known as an author, speaker, research synthesizer, and health/fitness/exercise advocate. Dr. Ratey will deliver a free-to-the-public address here in Tulsa on Sunday the 13th; the event happens in the Walter Arts Center at Holland Hall School (at 5666 East 81st Street), beginning at 7pm.

As we grow older, of course, our bodies become less and less capable --- and less reliable --- when it comes to doing all the things we used to do. But as our guest reports on ST today, one of the very exciting findings in recent medical research is that the human brain can actually grow (and get stronger) over time --- and a bigger brain means better memory, increased creativity, sharper concentration skills, and a more rapid speed of learning. Our guest is Dr. Majid Fotuhi, the internationally recognized neurologist, science writer, and medical commentator.

On this edition of ST on Health, we welcome Dr. Lamont Cavanagh, a Tulsa-based family physician who specializes in sports medicine, and who also works as an assistant professor at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Moreover, Dr. Cavanagh spent five years as an U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, and he's now chief of aerospace medicine for the 138th Fighter Wing of the Oklahoma Air National Guard.

Why are concussions in sports today --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this encore edition of our program, we listen back to an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. When we originally spoke with Dr.

Why are concussions in sports --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this edition of our program, an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research here in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. A week from tonight --- on Thursday the 6th, beginning at 6pm --- Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST is the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this in turn tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition. A professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, a MacArthur "Genius" Fellow, and an author whose works include such popular books as "A Primate's Memoir" and "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," Dr.

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