Brady Arts District (Tulsa)

On this edition of ST, we get to know Doug Levitt, an American singer-songwriter...and former London-based foreign correspondent (who once upon a time reported for, among others, ABC and NBC). About a decade ago -- or about 100,000 miles ago -- Levitt started riding Greyhound buses all across this nation in order to gather stories, songs, pictures, and memories of those who travel by bus in America.

Have you noticed the enormous, vivid, and woven tapestry draping the entire front facade of the 108 Contemporary gallery in downtown Tulsa? It's an installation that's been hanging for a few weeks now, and it's entitled "The Unbearable Absence of Landscape." This vast piece -- made of panels created by hundreds of knitters all over the state with plastic yarn that, if unraveled, would stretch over 160 miles -- will have its official opening tonight (the 4th) at 6pm at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in the Brady Arts District.

Interested in the idea of living in downtown Tulsa? Curious about all the apartment buildings and office spaces that seem to getting refurbished or constructed downtown these days? Wondering about what might be in store for a certain vacant property or unsightly parking lot within the City of Tulsa's Inner Dispersal Loop? If you've answered in the affirmative to any or all of these queries, you might want to check out the 3rd Annual Dwell in the IDL Tour, which will be presented by the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture this coming Sunday, the 4th, from noon to 5pm.

Summertime...and the living is...cultured. On this edition of ST, we welcome Rand Suffolk back to the program. As the Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, Suffolk tells us about the various events and shows comprising that museum's "All-Star Summer." These include the exhibitions "The Figure Examined" and "The Art of Ceremony" -- both of which will be on view at the main Philbrook campus through early September -- and certain exhibits now happening (or coming soon) to the Philbrook Downtown space, among them a show that Suffolk himself curated.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Julie Watson and Mike Koster, the co-directors of Tulsa Roots Music, a nonprofit and ongoing (and quite wonderful) concert series that first got underway here in our community about four years ago. On Saturday the 18th, the day-long Tulsa Roots Music Bash will be presented, for the second consecutive year, at the Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa.

The 108 Contemporary gallery in the Brady Arts District in downtown Tulsa opened a new exhibit this past weekend that focuses on the growth and development of fiber art in America from roughly the 1950s onward. The show -- called "Innovators and Legends" -- runs through March 22nd. Our guest on ST is the curator for this exhibit, Geary Jones, who is himself a well-regarded fiber artist.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Steve Liggett, artistic director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (located downtown at 307 East Brady). Liggett is also the curator of "Chandelier & Other Luminous Objects," which opened in early August and will remain on exhibit at the Living Arts gallery through September 25th -- and which Liggett tells us all about on today's program.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Bill Leighty, a longtime realtor in our community who's also served on the Tulsa Metropolitan Area Planning Commission, the City's Transportation Advisory Board, and its Land Use Task Force. Moreover, Leighty is the executive director of the Smart Growth Tulsa Coalition, which he tells us all about on today's program.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with the Oklahoma City-based artist and curator, Nathan Lee. Lee is the curator of "Noir," a newly opened group show at the Living Arts space in downtown Tulsa which includes work from a number of different African-American artists from throughout Oklahoma --- and which will be on exhibit through July 11th. As is noted of this show at the Living Arts of Tulsa website: "'Noir' is an examination of the shifting definition of Black culture.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with the mixed-media artist Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, who studied art at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and then at UCLA and now lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As is noted of this artist at her personal website: "[Gakunga's] works are predominantly wall-hanging sculptures created from tin cans, steel wire, and oxidized sheet metal forms.

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