Barry Friedman

On this edition of our program, we speak with Phil Klay, a writer and veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps whose 2014 short-story collection, "Redeployment," won the National Book Award for Fiction. Klay will appear in our community soon as part of a "Creative Writing Celebration" being presented by TU's newly established Creative Writing segment within the Department of English.

What is "co-housing" -- and why has it become so popular so quickly in certain parts of the U.S.? And how is it different from assisted living, or nursing-home living, or communal living? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Melanie Fry and Jane Zemel, two Tulsans who are involved with the still-emerging movement to create a Tulsa Senior Co-Housing community.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) We speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men" and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published in 2014, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the book by the St.

On this edition of ST, we offer a closer look at some of the economic development objectives within the Vision Tulsa proposal. For years, the north side of Tulsa has felt neglected and shortchanged when it comes to infrastructure improvements as well as efforts to provide good-paying jobs in the area. But within Vision Tulsa, there is money for a public-private partership that would create a ready and receptive environment for the next potential manufacturing or industrial employer looking at our city as an expansion site.

On this edition of ST, we chat with author Stewart O'Nan about his latest book, "West of Sunset," which is just out in paperback. It's a novel that imagines the final years of F. Scott Fitzgerald's life, when he was living and working in Hollywood in the 1930s...and trying, more or less in vain, to re-capture the literary greatness of his earlier years.

"Untitled, 2015" by Joe Andoe

On this presentation of StudioTulsa, an enjoyable discussion with the acclaimed artist, Joe Andoe, who is based in New York City and grew up in Tulsa, and whose works are still very much informed by the look and feel of certain parts of our community. (Indeed, on our show today, he refers to East Tulsa as his "muse.") Andoe has a new exhibit on view in Tulsa, which opened last week at Aberson Exhibits on Brookside (near 35th and Peoria).

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa American Film Festival, which, per its website, "showcases independent feature and short films from across the U.S., highlighting Native American films, Oklahoma-based filmmakers, local student short films, a classic Oklahoma-centric film retrospective in addition to panels and parties." The festival happens later this week, from the 15th through the 18th, with screenings at the Circle Cinema and other events at the Woody Guthrie Center and the Gilcrease Museum.

Today's ST offers another discussion in our series of interviews with organizations aiming to acquire funding through the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. Our guests, both members of TYPros, are two of the principals behind the much-talked-about proposal to create a Boston Avenue Multisport (or "BAM") Facility, which would exist between Boston and Cincinnati Avenues, and between 10th and 12th Streets, in downtown Tulsa: Terrell Hoagland is the Director of Sustainability for Jones Design Studio and Kenton Grant is the owner of Kenton Grant Consulting.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Anthony Wilkinson, the writer/creator of "My Big Gay Italian Wedding," a musical comedy that premiered off-Broadway in 2003...and then, eventually, after some revisions...opened on Broadway itself in 2010. This popular play is still staged in NYC, and it's also been presented -- by this point -- at venues all over the glove. It actually opened here in Tulsa last night, the 16th, in a production being offered by the Tulsa-based American Theatre Company through June 26th.

Our guest on ST is cultural anthropologist Christina E. Burke, who is the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Joseph Malham, a Chicago-based writer and iconographer, who will soon appear here in Tulsa at the Gilcrease Museum. Malham is the author of "John Ford: Poet in the Desert," and he'll speak about the life and work of the legendary filmmaker Ford (1894-1973) tomorrow, Friday the 6th, at noon at the museum.

Every fall, thousands of people sign up for National Novel Writing Month (or, if you like, "NaNoWriMo"), which happens each November, and which was founded by our guest today, a freelance writer and writing coach in the Bay Area named Chris Baty. Baty's program has helped countless people -- over the last 15 years or so -- finally write that elusive novel and/or get down a workable first draft of said novel to the tune of 50,000 words....

On this edition of our show, we learn about "Mother Road," which is "an exploration of Route 66 by artist Jessica Harvey" that will be on view at the AHHA space (in the Brady Arts District in downtown Tulsa) through November 23rd. Harvey, who's originally from Chicago, has exhibited throughout the United States, and is currently in residence at the AHHA Creative Studios, is our guest on ST today.

A fine show recently opened at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Form and Line: Allan Houser's Sculpture and Drawings" will be on exhibit through June 29th. One of the most widely known and admired Native American artists of the 20th century, the Oklahoma-born Houser, who died at 80 in 1994, was a Chiricahua Apache sculptor, painter, and book illustrator. He was also a dedicated and highly influential teacher of art, most notably at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, NM.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Andrea Mazzarino, an anthropologist specializing in contemporary Russia who's currently a Fellow at the Europe and Central Asia Division of Human Rights Watch. While working with Human Rights Watch, she has researched and written various reports on human rights abuses. Last night, with the 2014 Olympic and Paralympic Games set to begin in Sochi (pictured here) in a matter of days, Dr.

Oscar Wilde is now rolling into Tulsa, so to speak, in a big way.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Max McLean, the producer and director of "The Screwtape Letters" --- he also formerly starred in this production --- which will be staged at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center on Saturday the 5th at both 4pm and 8pm. This is a theatrical adaptation of the C.S. Lewis novel of the same title, which is a widely cherished little book (commonly seen as a masterpiece, and dating from the early 1940s) that presents letters written by one of Satan's leading demons (named Screwtape) to his nephew (named Wormwood).

On today's show, we speak with Courtneay Sanders, artistic director of The Playhouse Tulsa, which has recently begun its new season with a funny play called "I Hate Hamlet" by Paul Rudrick. The play will be staged in the Williams Theatre at the Tulsa PAC through Saturday the 14th.

LOOK Musical Theatre, a revered nonprofit that began as the Gilbert & Sullivan Society of Tulsa (with "LOOK" later signifying Light Opera Oklahoma) is currently marking its 30th season; the organization was founded in 1983 by John and Jane Carmichael Everitt in association with The University of Tulsa. Every June, LOOK presents professional performances in repertory fashion; these shows are produced and staffed by dozens of professionals: artistic, technical, and marketing personnel from regions both local and national.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that first aired in May of last year. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Ricki Lewis, a geneticist, journalist, professor, and genetic counselor. She's also the author of one of the most widely used college textbooks about genetics --- "Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications" --- and her latest book, now out in paperback, is "The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It." Dr.

"Oil Politics in the Islamic Republic of Iran"

Mar 11, 2013

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Paasha Mahdavi, who is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at UCLA. As part of the University of Tulsa Collins College of Business Lecture Series, Mahdavi will deliver a free-to-the-public talk on "Oil Politics in the Islamic Republic of Iran" on Wednesday the 13th at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium on the TU campus. Mahdavi's ongoing research concerns the study of national oil company governance and the political consequences of oil nationalizations, and he joins us today by phone.

The widely praised "Models & Muses: Max Weber and the Figure" exhibit at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa will close on February 3rd. On this installment of ST, we revisit this terrific show --- the first museum survey of Weber's work in two decades, and an exhibition which originated at Philbrook --- in order to explore one aspect of Weber's long and influential career in American modern art. Namely, that aspect is his relationship with Mark Rothko, the pioneering abstract painter who, while still a young man, was briefly a student of Weber's in the middle 1920s.

On this installment of ST, we are discussing Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin's recent decision not to join the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

On today's edition of ST, an interesting discussion with the Ohio-based artist Cecile Baird, who is currently the ARTworks Featured Artist at Holland Hall School in Tulsa. A master of the colored-pencil medium, Baird has recently been working with art students at that school --- and several of her striking, well-rendered, nearly photo-realistic works will be on view at Holland Hall's Holliman Gallery (in the Walter Arts Center on the HH campus) through November 26th.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we welcome back Scott Perkins, a curator at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, who tells us about a fine exhibit currently on view at the Price Tower called "From Process to Print: Graphic Works by Romare Bearden." Bearden (1911-1988) is widely regarded as one of the most important African-American artists this country has produced; he made art works in a range of media and was also a gifted writer, a cherished mentor to younger generations of artists, a tireless arts advocate, and a prominent intellectual and collaborator within the artistic/cu

Our guest on ST is Gary Peluso-Verdend, President of Phillips Theological Seminary (or PTS) here in Tulsa. Established in 1907, PTS recently changed both its identity and mission statements.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are joined by Dan Call and David Blakely, two Tulsa-area theatre veterans who are involved with a new musical, "Hank the Cowdog and Monkey Business," which is being presented by Tulsa Repertory Musicals as part of the SummerStage series at the Tulsa PAC. It's a family-friendly show that's been adapted from one the titles in the popular (and long-running) "Hank the Cowdog" series of children's books by John Erickson; it will play in the PAC's Doenges Theater from today (the 21st) through Sunday (the 24th).

On this edition of our show, we discuss a newly created, two-generation program to move parents and their children beyond poverty: the Community Action Project of Tulsa's CareerAdvance initiative. Our guest is Anne Mosle, a Vice President at the Aspen Institute and the Executive Director of the its Ascend Program, which focuses on economic security for families. Mosle recently visited Tulsa in order to observe the CareerAdvance program (which has been funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the Inasmuch Foundation, and the Health Profession Opportunities Grant) firsthand.

On today's ST, we speak with Christina Burke, Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Burke assembled an exhibit which opened at the museum earlier this month, and which is on view through June 3rd, called "Seeking the Sacred: Religious Ritual in Native American Art." It's a show that mainly draws on Philbrook's world-famous collection of 20th-century Native American paintings.

On today's program, we speak with Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Keith Ballard, who --- like every other school system administrator across Oklahoma --- is working hard to deal with the new reality of reduced state expenditures for education. Indeed, such aid is now lower than it was four years ago. Less and less money for schools, teachers, classrooms, and textbooks means more and more to be alarmed about, according to Dr.