Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

On this installment of ST, an interesting discussion with Whitney Phillips, an Assistant Professor of Literary Studies and Writing at Mercer University's Penfield College.

On today's ST, we learn about a new musical -- a "bro-mantic" comedy, no less -- loosely based on the thousand-year-old epic poem, "Beowulf." It's the still-in-development "Beowulf, Lord of the Bros," and it will be workshopped at a pair of free-to-the-public performances on Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, at the Theatre Two space in Kendall Hall on the TU campus, with both shows starting at 7pm.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the writer and writing instructor Teresa Miller back to our program. She founded the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers in the early 1990s, and around that same time she started hosting and producing a popular public-television interview show, Writing Out Loud. Her books include the novels "Remnants of Glory" and "Family Correspondence," as well as "Means of Transit," which is an autobiography.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the popular New Yorker cartoonist and bestselling author Roz Chast about her latest book, an award-winning graphic memoir called "Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?" It's a book that is, as Michiko Kakutani noted in The New York Times, "by turns grim and absurd, deeply poignant and laugh-out-loud funny. Ms.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the critically acclaimed singer and actor Jason Graae, who has starred on Broadway in "A Grand Night for Singing," "Falsettos," "Stardust," and "Snoopy!" -- among other shows -- and has appeared Off-Broadway in such hits as "Forever Plaid," "Olympus on My Mind," "All in the Timing," and more. A comic performer with a strong voice and a broad range of abilities, Graae, who actually grew up in Tulsa, has also appeared in various operas, and has done several one-man shows and cabaret concerts nationwide over the years.

On this installment of ST, we chat with Marcello Angelini, artistic director of Tulsa Ballet. The company will soon present "The Taming of the Shrew" at the Tulsa PAC, with performances scheduled for October 23rd, 24th, and 25th. As noted of this production at the Tulsa Ballet website: "Shakespeare's famous comedy springs to life through masterful choreography by the legendary John Cranko, with music by Domenico Scarlatti freely arranged by Kurt-Heinz Stolze.

Our guest on ST is Dr. William D. Adams, who became the 10th Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) last year. The NEH -- along with the National Endowment for the Arts -- is now marking its 50th anniversary, and thus Dr. Adams is making appearances all over the nation to celebrate the NEH's accomplishments while also explaining its goals, purposes, and various initiatives.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a vivid and exciting new exhibition at Philbrook, "In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation," which will be on view through January 17, 2016. Mr. Schnitzer is our guest today.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Robert W. Jordan, who is Diplomat in Residence and Adjunct Professor of Political Science in the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. Jordan served as U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 2001 to 2003, taking charge of his mission in the wake of the 9/11 attacks -- an especially critical time in U.S.-Saudi relations. Jordan spoke recently here in Tulsa, when he was guest of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

Giacomo Puccini's "La Boheme" is, of course, the musically sumptuous tale of four young Parisienne bohemians and their loves and losses. (It's also, as many of us know, the basis for "Rent.") Tulsa Opera's 68th season gets underway this weekend with this popular opera. Karin Wolverton stars as Mimi, and Sony Music recording artist Nathan Granner (of "American Tenors" fame) makes his company and role debut as Rodolfo. We're joined on this edition of ST by Tulsa Opera's artistic director, and conductor for the production, Kostis Protopapas, who talks in detail about this opera.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with acclaimed playwright Lee Blessing, who's best known for his 1988 Tony-nominated play, "A Walk in the Woods." Back in January, he workshopped his most recent play, "The Hourglass Project," here at the University of Tulsa. It's a comedy, with interesting ethical overtones, about several elderly couples who, though an experimental procedure, regain their youth.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa American Film Festival, which, per its website, "showcases independent feature and short films from across the U.S., highlighting Native American films, Oklahoma-based filmmakers, local student short films, a classic Oklahoma-centric film retrospective in addition to panels and parties." The festival happens later this week, from the 15th through the 18th, with screenings at the Circle Cinema and other events at the Woody Guthrie Center and the Gilcrease Museum.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

Our guest on today's StudioTulsa is the Oregon-based author Craig Ryan, who tells us about his new book, just out from Liveright: "Sonic Wind: The Story of John Paul Stapp and How a Renegade Doctor Became the Fastest Man on Earth." This biography offers readers, per a starred review in Kirkus, "[the] remarkable, almost-forgotten story of an aerospace pioneer....

On this edition of ST, we learn about a locally based conference on the prevention of child sexual abuse, which is happening today and tomorrow (the 8th and 9th) at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center (at 41st and Yale). "Shifting Child Sexual Abuse Paradigms" -- hosted by the nonprofit Empowering Adults-Protecting Children, Inc. -- will bring together a range of experts who work every day in this regard with children and families throughout Oklahoma.

This evening, Wednesday the 7th, the TU College of Law will present the 19th Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture in the John Rogers Hall on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture is free to the public and begins at 6pm. Our guest on ST is the well-regarded author and journalist who will be giving this lecture: Lincoln Caplan is the Truman Capote Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, and his writing about legal matters appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, and elsewhere.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly opened exhibit at Gilcrease, "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley," which will be on view through January 3rd. As is noted of this show at the Gilcrease Museum website: "More than 150 years after his Smithsonian gallery burned to the ground, John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective exhibition.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Erik Larson, the bestselling nonfiction writer whose page-turning historical narratives include "The Devil in the White City," "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin," and (most recently) "Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania." This last named book -- exploring the events before, during, and after the 1915 sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania -- is the main thrust of our conversation, although Larson also speaks about how he locates, happens upon, researches, and writes his remarkable stories.

Interested in the idea of living in downtown Tulsa? Curious about all the apartment buildings and office spaces that seem to getting refurbished or constructed downtown these days? Wondering about what might be in store for a certain vacant property or unsightly parking lot within the City of Tulsa's Inner Dispersal Loop? If you've answered in the affirmative to any or all of these queries, you might want to check out the 3rd Annual Dwell in the IDL Tour, which will be presented by the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture this coming Sunday, the 4th, from noon to 5pm.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Norbert Herber, a musician, sound artist, and Department of Telecommunications faculty member at Indiana University, who is presenting an art exhibition soon on the TU campus. This show, called "For the [ ] of the Loop," will be on view at the Hogue Gallery within the TU School of Art from October 2nd through the 29th.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Todd Lasseigne back to our show. He's a nationally recognized horticulturist who is also the president & CEO of the Tulsa Botanic Garden. This weekend, the Garden will celebrate the grand opening of its new A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces -- the big "public unveiling" happens at noon on Saturday, October 3rd.

On this edition of ST, we speak with P.W. Singer, who is a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation; the founder of NeoLuddite, a technology advisory firm; and the author of several award-winning books. Singer is widely considered a leading expert on trends and tactics in 21st-century warfare, and he'll be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight (Tuesday the 29th) on the TU campus. The talk is entitled "Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know," and it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall.

On this edition of ST, we speak Ronnie Greene, an investigative journalist for the Associated Press who also teaches graduate writing at Johns Hopkins University.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Hege, who is the newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony. Tomorrow night, Saturday the 26th, at 7:30pm, the symphony will present its first Tulsa PAC concert of the new season; it's an evening entitled "Experience the Exotic." On the program: Rimsky-Korsakov's famous tone poem, "Scheherazade," as well as Liszt's "Piano Concerto No.

Theatre Tulsa's much-praised SummerStage production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "Next to Normal," returns this weekend for a set of "back by popular demand" performances at the Tulsa PAC's John H. Williams Theatre. A novel and quite jolting blend of rock music and intense drama, this play depicts a mother who struggles with bipolar disorder, exploring how the affliction affects not only herself but her family.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the popular historian whom H.W. Brands has called "a master of the historical moment" -- Jay Winik is our guest; he's the author of the bestselling "April 1865," among other books. Winik talks with us about his newest volume, which is just out: "1944: FDR and the Year That Changed History." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Kirkus: "An accomplished popular historian unpacks the last full year of World War II and the excruciatingly difficult decisions facing Franklin Roosevelt....

On this installment of ST, we speak with the poet and performance/conceptual artist, Kenneth Goldsmith, who has appeared on The Colbert Report, held a poetry reading in the White House, and published more than ten books. He's also the first-ever poet laureate to be selected by The Museum of Modern Art -- and he'll offer a free-to-the-public poetry reading tonight, Tuesday the 22nd, at 9pm in Tyrell Hall on the TU campus.

The proposals for the City of Tulsa's Vision sales-tax extension are all now in, and those proposals are many and varied. Some are, indeed, visionary; others seem fanciful. Some are familiar; others seem quite novel. All of the proposals -- there were more than 130 in total -- address perceived needs of one kind or another in our community, and taken together, they tally more than $2 billion in spending. Now comes the difficult task of narrowing down the numerous needs, goals, and desires in these proposals to a coherent set of projects that will be put before voters in April of next year.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and