StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Kristen T. Oertel, the Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century American History here at TU.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

What if you had an app on your smartphone that could tell precisely how much a certain medical procedure was going to cost...before you even visited the doctor or called your health insurance company? Sounds like a rather great (and overdue) idea, no? Such an app is very much in development these days, right here in our community. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Matt Scovil and Nathan Gilchrist, the two co-founders of a company called Medefy.

On this presentation of ST, our guest by phone is Tavis Smiley, the renowned broadcaster, author, political commentator, publisher, and columnist. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 28th, Smiley will be given the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Sankofa Freedom Award during a free-to-the-public ceremony at the Rudisill Regional Library in North Tulsa. (The library is located at 1520 N.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest on ST is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a new exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain" will be on view through April 24th. Featuring more than 100 art works, including sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, mixed media pieces, and the giant pastels for which Bartow is best known, the exhibit draws from both public and private collections -- including the artist's own studio.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "The Vaudeville Museum" -- a special evening of Vaudeville history, perspective, and performance -- that will be staged at TU's McFarlin Library at 7pm both tonight and tomorrow night (the 22nd and 23rd). It's an interactive, interdisciplinary, and free-to-the-public presentation that's recently been created by Machele Miller-Dill, Director of TU's Musical Theatre Program, who also performs in this throwback event and is one of our guests today.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

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