StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sandra Postel, a well-respected expert on freshwater conservation who's also the founder of the Global Water Policy Project. She co-created Change the Course, a national freshwater conservation and restoration campaign, and in 2010, she was appointed a Freshwater Fellow of the National Geographic Society, where she still serves as the Society's leading water expert.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with Gustavo Coronel, who had a 30+ year career in the petroleum industry in Venezuela, Holland, Algiers, Indonesia, most of Latin America, and the United States, while working for Royal Dutch-Shell, Phillips Petroleum, and Petroleos de Venezuela. Since 2006, he has been an independent consultant on the geopolitics of energy and Latin American public policy.

On this edition of ST, we get to know Doug Levitt, an American singer-songwriter...and former London-based foreign correspondent (who once upon a time reported for, among others, ABC and NBC). About a decade ago -- or about 100,000 miles ago -- Levitt started riding Greyhound buses all across this nation in order to gather stories, songs, pictures, and memories of those who travel by bus in America.

Today's ST is a replay of a show from two weeks ago, which was preempted by a presidential press conference. For this edition of our program, we check in with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl, for a few page-turning gift suggestions. (With the holidays fast upon us, it's entirely worth pointing out that one can never really go wrong with a good book....) A well-known librarian, now retired, who began appearing on our show back when she lived in Tulsa -- in the early 1990s -- Nancy is also a bestselling author, literary critic, and book editor.

The recent decision by the Tulsa Public Facilities Authority to sell more than 12 acres of Helmerich Park (at 71st and Riverside in Tulsa) to a private developer is creating controversy and organized opposition. The location has been touted as a future retail site for the outdoor recreational business, REI, on land that (under the Arkansas River Corridor Master Plan) does call for some development.

Have you noticed the enormous, vivid, and woven tapestry draping the entire front facade of the 108 Contemporary gallery in downtown Tulsa? It's an installation that's been hanging for a few weeks now, and it's entitled "The Unbearable Absence of Landscape." This vast piece -- made of panels created by hundreds of knitters all over the state with plastic yarn that, if unraveled, would stretch over 160 miles -- will have its official opening tonight (the 4th) at 6pm at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in the Brady Arts District.

Our guest on StudioTulsa today is the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author, and military historian Rick Atkinson, who is the recipient of this year's Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. (This prize is awarded annually by the Tulsa Library Trust.) Atkinson grew up a self-described "military brat" and began his writing career as a newspaper reporter in Pittsburgh, Kansas, and today he's perhaps best known for his bestselling "Liberation Trilogy" about the U.S. Army's role in the liberation of Europe during World War II.

On this presentation of ST on Health, an interesting chat with Theresa Brown, a clinical nurse who also writes regularly about nursing for The New York Times, CNN.com, and other national media. Brown's new memoir is "The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients' Lives," and Publishers Weekly (in a starred review) called it a "meticulous, absorbing shift-in-the-life account of one nurse's day on a cancer ward [which] stands out for its honesty, clarity, and heart.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men," "The Way of the World," and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published last year, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the book by the St.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a provocative discussion with Fred Pearce, an award-winning author and journalist based in London who's reported on environmental, science, and development issues all over the planet for the past twenty years.

(Note: This interview originally aired in June.) On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through the day.

How long has atheism been a part of human experience? Most people today regard the sustained, intellectually rigorous adherence to non-religion as an invention of the European Enlightenment -- or, more recently, of modernity. But as our guest argues on this edition of ST, atheism is actually -- like so many other aspects of Western life and culture -- a phenomenon with origins in the societies of the ancient Mediterranean.

On this edition of ST, with the holiday season just around the corner, we check in with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl, for some page-turning, gift-giving tips. A well-known librarian -- now retired -- who began appearing on our show back when she lived in Tulsa in the early 1990s, Nancy is also a bestselling author, literary critic, and book editor.

(Note: This interview originally aired in June of this year.) On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an entertaining conversation with the celebrated British choral composer and conductor, Bob Chilcott, who sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, as both a boy and a university student. Known for his compositions for children's choirs and other vocal groups, Chilcott has worked in a wide array of musical settings; he's been composing music of his own since 1997.

On this edition of our show, we get to know the novelist and short story writer Jennifer duBois, who teaches in the MFA program at Texas State University. Her first novel, "A Partial History of Lost Causes," was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction, and her second, "Cartwheel," won the Housatonic Book Award for Fiction and was a finalist for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Award. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a former Stanford University Stegner Fellow, duBois is also the recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Matthew Gavin Frank, a Michigan-based writer and creative writing teacher whose past books include "Preparing the Ghost," "Pot Farm," "Barolo (At Table)," and "Sagittarius Agitprop." He joins us to discuss his newest book, a collection of fifty essays that, all in all, offers a full-fledged culinary tour of the United States, with a "signature dish" for each state being described in fascinating and far-reaching detail.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Philip Lederer, a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Dr. Lederer also writes about medical and health-related issues frequently, and one of his primary concerns as a writer comes down, quite simply, to two words: white coats. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we learn about World Neighbors. This OKC-based NGO, per its website, "focuses on training and educating communities to find lasting solutions to the challenges they face -- hunger, poverty, and disease -- rather than giving them food, money, or constructing buildings. Children often walk miles just for access to clean water. World Neighbors works to ease the burden of water walks by educating communities how to install wells in their villages.

On this installment of ST, a conversation with the Houston-based composer and pianist Pierre Jalbert. As presented by Chamber Music Tulsa, the widely acclaimed Weiss Kaplan Stumpf Trio will perform one of Jalbert's compositions at a Sunday afternoon concert on the 15th. The concert begins at 3pm in the Tulsa PAC's Williams Theatre, and Jalbert himself will be giving a pre-concert talk at 2:15pm.

On this edition of ST, a chat with Bruce Adolphe, the New York-based pianist and composer who's probably best known for his long-running gig as "The Piano Puzzler" on the classical public-radio show, Performance Today. He'll be giving a free-to-the-public address on Saturday the 14th in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus; the talk begins at 7pm and will focus on humor in music.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Friese, a visual artist and former Tulsan whose paintings, prints, and etchings are now on display in the Alexandre Hogue Gallery on the TU campus; this exhibit features beautifully rendered landscapes created in open-air settings in both Rhode Island and North Dakota. The show will be on view through December 17th.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

In 1963, the up-and-coming pop artist Andy Warhol took a road trip across America, from New York to Los Angeles.

Jiro Schneider / Frank Salomon Agency

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will perform this coming Monday evening (the 9th) in a concert featuring Spanish Renaissance music, Manuel De Falla's "El Amor Brujo," and a range of eclectic works ranging from English composer John Dowland to Chet Atkins and Dweezil Zappa. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with one of this Grammy Award-winning ensemble's members, former Tulsan Matthew Greif.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author and journalist John Sedgwick, whose many books range from a psychological thriller, "The Dark House," to a multi-generational family memoir, "In My Blood." He joins us to talk about his newest book, a work of popular history entitled "War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation." Interestingly, Sedgwick has an ancestor who actually knew both Hamilton and Burr quite well, and it was his own research into the life and work of that ancestor which first led Sedgwick to think of writing this book.

We're probably all aware of the much-publicized "online predators" who go after children these days on the internet, preying on innocent kids by way of trickery and violence. But these crimes, while obviously sick and deplorable, are over-hyped. How did this pervasive over-hyping come to be, and why does it persist? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the novelist and writing instructor Eileen Pollack, whose books include the novels "Breaking and Entering" and "Paradise, New York," as well as two collections of short fiction and two creative-nonfiction textbooks. Her newest book is a memoir called "The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club," and it looks back on her challenging experiences as a young woman majoring in physics at Yale in the 1970s while also highlighting various issues that still plague women in science across the nation today.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the newest production from Tulsa's own American Theatre Company, "Waiting for Godot" by Samuel Beckett. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who's directing this postmodernist/absurdist classic. The play will be staged from tonight (the 30th) though November 7th at the ATC space in downtown Tulsa near 3rd and Lansing.

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